kannmnn
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I just started year 12 and I’m hoping to apply to either Biology or Biomedical science at a top uni. The entry requirements for are Oxford are: Biology- Biology and another science
Biomedical sciences - Two science subjects
I’ve taken two sciences (biology and chemistry), so I fulfill these requirements. However, the overall acceptance rate for biomed is much lower than biology. What causes this? Is it just that way more people apply for this or maybe the fact that biomed has an aptitude test whereas biology doesn’t? Or, does taking more sciences at alevel than what is required give you an advantage? And if that is the case, would it be worth applying to biomed with only two sciences and one humanity (history is my third alevel)
Also would like to point out that my GCSE results were pretty good as I know oxford looks at those quite a lot. I got a 9 in all sciences and an 8 in maths. All my others were 8/9, apart from English lit and art- I got 7s.
Would I stand a chance at applying for biomed at oxford then?
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ConicalFlask
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I do biomed at Oxford and I know a lot of other people doing biomed who only did two sciences at A level, so it's definitely possible.

I'd guess (though I don't know for sure) that the acceptance for biomed seems a lot lower than for biology because the actual intake is a lot lower (around 35-40 people per year) compared to the number of people that apply, but not necessarily compared to the number of people that have a good chance of getting in - i.e. the group of people applying that have no chance of getting in makes up a larger proportion of the total number of applicants.

Sorry if that makes no sense in text lol
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BrasenoseAdm
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(Original post by ConicalFlask)
I do biomed at Oxford and I know a lot of other people doing biomed who only did two sciences at A level, so it's definitely possible.

I'd guess (though I don't know for sure) that the acceptance for biomed seems a lot lower than for biology because the actual intake is a lot lower (around 35-40 people per year) compared to the number of people that apply, but not necessarily compared to the number of people that have a good chance of getting in - i.e. the group of people applying that have no chance of getting in makes up a larger proportion of the total number of applicants.

Sorry if that makes no sense in text lol
Hola ConicalFlask (& kannmnn),

You are exactly right. Biology received 1.7 times more applicants but was able to make 2.8 times more offers last cycle. Hence the acceptance rate for Biology (20%) was higher than for Biomedical Sciences (12%).

This illustrates well how the likelihood of success is influenced by the course applied for because it is not usually possible to transfer candidates between courses. In contrast, candidates can be transferred between colleges which tends towards equalising the likelihood of receiving an offer across the several colleges.

Brasenose Admissions
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