the biggest choice i will have to make and need your help

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yotsr123
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should i do a law degree at a top 10 uni and focus on doing loads of internships, work experiences, networking events, getting involved with student union/societies. after this, do you think together with my law degree i would have a real chance at gaining a training contract? Because i am hearing that even oxford law graduates have a hard time getting contracts - oxford graduates!!! This has shown to me that the job market is incredibly tough for law graduates wanting to be solicitors.

So.. do you think it's a good idea to pursue a law degree given I want to be a solicitor or should I not try since training contracts are so sparse nowadays I might be better off doing a degree that leads to an alternative direct career path?
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Joleee
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my understanding is that scoring a training contract is competitive even for oxford graduates, yes. i'm not an expert on such topics but my guess is, as an oxford grad, ya'll have similar interests/expectations and all apply to the same firms, thus competing against each other instead of applying to smaller firms and/or firms in less desirable locations. how willing are you to relocate and not work in glamorous law?

btw moved your thread to the Law forum
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yotsr123
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(Original post by Joleee)
my understanding is that scoring a training contract is competitive even for oxford graduates, yes. i'm not an expert on such topics but my guess is, as an oxford grad, ya'll have similar interests/expectations and all apply to the same firms, thus competing against each other instead of applying to smaller firms and/or firms in less desirable locations. how willing are you to relocate and not work in glamorous law?

btw moved your thread to the Law forum
yep, i'd be willing to relocate and i know that competition is massive for big law firms (eg clifford chance) so wouldn't mind working for other great law firms that might not have the same name brand. i'd be applying for them and at least one big one too.
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Joleee
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(Original post by yotsr123)
yep, i'd be willing to relocate and i know that competition is massive for big law firms (eg clifford chance) so wouldn't mind working for other great law firms that might not have the same name brand. i'd be applying for them and at least one big one too.
if you love law and get the opportunity to study it at oxford, i mean do it. that is a huge opportunity and it's not like solicitor will be your only career option (see Careers with a Law Degree).

if this is what you're shooting for, imo you need to do it and worry about the competitive training contract later. you might just change your mind years from now and want to do something else.
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yotsr123
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(Original post by Joleee)
if you love law and get the opportunity to study it at oxford, i mean do it. that is a huge opportunity and it's not like solicitor will be your only career option (see Careers with a Law Degree).

if this is what you're shooting for, imo you need to do it and worry about the competitive training contract later. you might just change your mind years from now and want to do something else.
yes but one of my main aims for university is getting a job after my degree so I'd want to have a training contract when I finish too.
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Joleee
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(Original post by yotsr123)
yes but one of my main aims for university is getting a job after my degree so I'd want to have a training contract when I finish too.
you will get a job. there's just no guaranteed training contract straight out of uni for anyone. if you're looking for a guarantee and not open to using your law degree for anything else, then maybe law isn't for you. :dontknow:
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harrysbar
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(Original post by yotsr123)
should i do a law degree at a top 10 uni and focus on doing loads of internships, work experiences, networking events, getting involved with student union/societies. after this, do you think together with my law degree i would have a real chance at gaining a training contract? Because i am hearing that even oxford law graduates have a hard time getting contracts - oxford graduates!!! This has shown to me that the job market is incredibly tough for law graduates wanting to be solicitors.

So.. do you think it's a good idea to pursue a law degree given I want to be a solicitor or should I not try since training contracts are so sparse nowadays I might be better off doing a degree that leads to an alternative direct career path?
It's tough to get training contracts but if you have the right academics that is more than half the battle - a surprising number of people don't do their research before doing a Law degree and don't realise that most of the large firms require A levels in the region of AAB- BBB as a minimum. People think all you need to do is get onto a Law degree at uni but there is a lot more to it than that. As you mentioned, you also need to get relevant work experience during your degree and get involved with extracurriculars - people who don't do this will also struggle to get a training contract, even if they did go to Oxford.

So I wouldn't say it is unrealistic for you to get a training contract as long as you get good A levels and do all the other things that are expected to make your application competitive.
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yotsr123
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(Original post by harrysbar)
It's tough to get training contracts but if you have the right academics that is more than half the battle - a surprising number of people don't do their research before doing a Law degree and don't realise that most of the large firms require A levels in the region of AAB- BBB as a minimum. People think all you need to do is get onto a Law degree at uni but there is a lot more to it than that. As you mentioned, you also need to get relevant work experience during your degree and get involved with extracurriculars - people who don't do this will also struggle to get a training contract, even if they did go to Oxford.

So I wouldn't say it is unrealistic for you to get a training contract as long as you get good A levels and do all the other things that are expected to make your application competitive.
what if for example i do a degree that directly leads to a career path, like for example mechanical engineering/healthcare, but I still do relevant law work experience and extracurriculars. Would my application immediately get raised eyebrows and therefore be put in the trash or would my application still be as competitive as someone who did a more broad degree (law, english, history)?
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harrysbar
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(Original post by yotsr123)
what if for example i do a degree that directly leads to a career path, like for example mechanical engineering/healthcare, but I still do relevant law work experience and extracurriculars. Would my application immediately get raised eyebrows and therefore be put in the trash or would my application still be as competitive as someone who did a more broad degree (law, english, history)?
Bear in mind I don't work in legal recruitment so this is just my opinion but I wouldn't have thought they would have a problem with someone switching from one vocational area to another. I have heard of people doing the GDL from maths/science degrees and getting training contracts so it does happen. The only downside I can see is that people on English/History degrees would still be practicing writing essays whereas you won't get much of that in a mech eng degree.
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username2950448
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(Original post by yotsr123)
what if for example i do a degree that directly leads to a career path, like for example mechanical engineering/healthcare, but I still do relevant law work experience and extracurriculars. Would my application immediately get raised eyebrows and therefore be put in the trash or would my application still be as competitive as someone who did a more broad degree (law, english, history)?
Not a problem at all. Approx 50% of trainees are non-law students.
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username1529975
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If you study at a top 10 and get involved in lots of stuff you’re in a very good position. It’s competitive but not impossible.
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17Student17
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The advice above is right but I have a fear you might be going to an obscure course with low entry requirements. Some of the supposedly career specific degrees like "business" which do not require high A levels would not be a good route to go down whereas people in my family who are doctors would be in a different position - a good degree and I know a good few who swapped to law after.

If you do want a good TC remember the firms will need AAB + at A level in good subjects., They will want to see your marks in every module including in year 1 of your degree and much else so do not take your foot off the academic brakes in your first year.
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harrysbar
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https://www.chambersstudent.co.uk/la...ction-criteria
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