What is your study routine after Uni lectures? Watch

Confffffffused
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How do you make notes from lectures? Typed? Handwritten? Does it really matter...
How many hours do you normally study for?
Do you make flashcards?
Do you learn as you make your notes or spend some time after revising them?
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ells99
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This is how it works for me:

I type notes in lectures because it's quicker and I can access diagrams. I usually use colloquialisms, abbreviations, and humour to help me initially remember information; if it's interesting, you'll remember it.

Then, I handwrite those notes out, with highlighters, coloured pens and diagrams - it ends up looking like a textbook. I reread over those whenever I can.

Then, I use the handwritten notes to make flashcards. Question-based or just fact based both work for me (e.g. What is the nucleus responsible for? vs. Nucleus)

Finally, I make every single lecture fit onto one A4 page, a summary sheet containing key facts and memory aids. If I can, then I fit the whole topic onto an A4 page as well.

I used this method for my final exams and I got 81% in my module overall and 82% in my exam. It's the method that works for me, it's mainly based off principles of repetition and retrieval practice. I try to find time to teach my classmates theories as well and do revision groups - but they usually work best when you're discussing theories with people who have revised, rather than teaching theories to people who are panicking before an exam.

Hope this helps!
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Anonymous #1
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hardly ever attended my lectures, but if i did, i'd only write down something that seems important or isnt in the slides. more often that not i wouldnt write anything at all tbh. my real routine starts after my lecture. i'd relax during the day then go to the library around 12 or 1am and stay for 6-8hrs.

worked great for me as itd force me to get some work done because i'd never want to leave the library before it got light outside.

i'd read/study the brief, go through my slides, do outside reading (relevant to the c/w or exam topic) and start my work/revision.
if my coursemates were at the library too, id visit them on my break, talk to them about the work, what theyre doing, maybe even have a read and allow them to read my work too. that way i had good measure to know if i was on track or completely missing the assignment.

this didn't fail me. i left uni with a 1st and had an attendance of 33%. not encouraging anyone to not go to their lectures btw. i was just lazy and found independent work more easier for me.
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Confffffffused
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(Original post by ells99)
This is how it works for me:

I type notes in lectures because it's quicker and I can access diagrams. I usually use colloquialisms, abbreviations, and humour to help me initially remember information; if it's interesting, you'll remember it.

Then, I handwrite those notes out, with highlighters, coloured pens and diagrams - it ends up looking like a textbook. I reread over those whenever I can.

Then, I use the handwritten notes to make flashcards. Question-based or just fact based both work for me (e.g. What is the nucleus responsible for? vs. Nucleus)

Finally, I make every single lecture fit onto one A4 page, a summary sheet containing key facts and memory aids. If I can, then I fit the whole topic onto an A4 page as well.

I used this method for my final exams and I got 81% in my module overall and 82% in my exam. It's the method that works for me, it's mainly based off principles of repetition and retrieval practice. I try to find time to teach my classmates theories as well and do revision groups - but they usually work best when you're discussing theories with people who have revised, rather than teaching theories to people who are panicking before an exam.

Hope this helps!
Was it time-consuming?
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Confffffffused
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(Original post by Anonymous)
hardly ever attended my lectures, but if i did, i'd only write down something that seems important or isnt in the slides. more often that not i wouldnt write anything at all tbh. my real routine starts after my lecture. i'd relax during the day then go to the library around 12 or 1am and stay for 6-8hrs.

worked great for me as itd force me to get some work done because i'd never want to leave the library before it got light outside.

i'd read/study the brief, go through my slides, do outside reading (relevant to the c/w or exam topic) and start my work/revision.
if my coursemates were at the library too, id visit them on my break, talk to them about the work, what theyre doing, maybe even have a read and allow them to read my work too. that way i had good measure to know if i was on track or completely missing the assignment.

this didn't fail me. i left uni with a 1st and had an attendance of 33%. not encouraging anyone to not go to their lectures btw. i was just lazy and found independent work more easier for me.
What about making notes for revision?
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gjd800
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Never typed up notes, never did flashcards. I'd read em again that day then forget about them, usually.

I just did a lot of reading outside of the lectures, and the lectures usually clarified any points of interest or points of confusion that I had
Last edited by gjd800; 4 weeks ago
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Mr Wednesday
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(Original post by Confffffffused)
Was it time-consuming?
If you are not looking at university as a full time job with loads of unpaid overtime you are approaching it in the wrong way . Yes, this kind of thing takes time but as Ells99 says, that can really pay off big time.

Exactly what works best will vary from person to person, but loads of research shows that actually hand writing notes, either in lectures or afterwards embeds that material into your brain better, for longer, and delivers higher exam marks than any other method.
Last edited by Mr Wednesday; 4 weeks ago
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ells99
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(Original post by Confffffffused)
Was it time-consuming?
Honestly, I scheduled my time pretty well. I wouldn't work after 7pm and before 6am for the sake of wellbeing and not being overwhelmed, giving me time to relax. This method is only time-consuming when you're unorganised. When you let it all pile up (written notes after lectures) you're suddenly spending weekends working to catch up.

As long as you're structured about it, I find that it's actually good at saving time doing unnecessary revision. I managed to work a part-time job at weekends as well with this method. You have to sacrifice a few nights out and less time scrolling through social media but honestly, I went from 62% to 82% and that's literally a huge difference (a low 2:1 and a very high 1st)

Hope this helps!
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Confffffffused
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Thanks!

Any more tips/suggestions would be awesome!
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