BigYikesFFS
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I know this is a very general question that differs from uni to uni but any answers will be appreciated. What Is in a biology course syllabus and content. Such as how much chemistry content is there and how does it compare with A-level, do you have to learn equations and do lots of maths calculations. How is it different to Biology A-level, is it mostly learning cycles, like photosynthesis. Sorry for all the questions but as much detail about the course would be great.
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Svenjamin
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(Original post by BigYikesFFS)
I know this is a very general question that differs from uni to uni but any answers will be appreciated. What Is in a biology course syllabus and content. Such as how much chemistry content is there and how does it compare with A-level, do you have to learn equations and do lots of maths calculations. How is it different to Biology A-level, is it mostly learning cycles, like photosynthesis. Sorry for all the questions but as much detail about the course would be great.
Biology at uni splits off into a lot of different directions. Biochemistry and biophysics have a lot of maths and formulas involved, other fields not so much. You can pretty much choose the bits you like and go from there. As far as a general "Biology" degree you can choose whatever modules you want. Most universities will encourage students to choose a specialism as it focuses the topics covered and provides better career prospects. But most universities will allow students to switch specialisms at the end of first year if they find another area interesting or get better grades in a certain module. So you can apply for general Biology, select the modules that interest you, and then transfer to what you like at the end of first year (your tutor should be able to help at the point of selecting modules as to a realistic plan).

Comparing to A level, it's similar but different. Most of my modules in microbiology/immunology/genetics/cellular biology did cover cycles and sequential processes of one kind or another, but obviously to a much closer detail than is ever covered at A level. I found A level had quite a lot of disjointed facts to the point of becoming a trivia quiz, covering little bits of lots of areas. Degree level focuses on far fewer levels, so you can make more connections between different processes and understand the bigger picture. I studied a chemistry module in first year, but that was optional (though it wouldve been compulsory if I didn't have Chemistry A Level). Other than that and a pharmacology module in first year I had absolutely no maths or chemistry in my degree. Even the chemistry unit was completely different to what I experienced at A level - a whole 20+ hour of lectures of nothing but electron fields. It was fascinating, but challenging.

To put into context, at uni I didn't cover ANY botany or organismal biology. The only evolution I studied was that of single cell organisms into multicellular organisms and tissues. The specialism you choose massively dictates the nature of your studies.
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kannmnn
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(Original post by Svenjamin)
Biology at uni splits off into a lot of different directions. Biochemistry and biophysics have a lot of maths and formulas involved, other fields not so much. You can pretty much choose the bits you like and go from there. As far as a general "Biology" degree you can choose whatever modules you want. Most universities will encourage students to choose a specialism as it focuses the topics covered and provides better career prospects. But most universities will allow students to switch specialisms at the end of first year if they find another area interesting or get better grades in a certain module. So you can apply for general Biology, select the modules that interest you, and then transfer to what you like at the end of first year (your tutor should be able to help at the point of selecting modules as to a realistic plan).

Comparing to A level, it's similar but different. Most of my modules in microbiology/immunology/genetics/cellular biology did cover cycles and sequential processes of one kind or another, but obviously to a much closer detail than is ever covered at A level. I found A level had quite a lot of disjointed facts to the point of becoming a trivia quiz, covering little bits of lots of areas. Degree level focuses on far fewer levels, so you can make more connections between different processes and understand the bigger picture. I studied a chemistry module in first year, but that was optional (though it wouldve been compulsory if I didn't have Chemistry A Level). Other than that and a pharmacology module in first year I had absolutely no maths or chemistry in my degree. Even the chemistry unit was completely different to what I experienced at A level - a whole 20+ hour of lectures of nothing but electron fields. It was fascinating, but challenging.

To put into context, at uni I didn't cover ANY botany or organismal biology. The only evolution I studied was that of single cell organisms into multicellular organisms and tissues. The specialism you choose massively dictates the nature of your studies.
Which university did you go to?
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nanachan123
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(Original post by BigYikesFFS)
I know this is a very general question that differs from uni to uni but any answers will be appreciated. What Is in a biology course syllabus and content. Such as how much chemistry content is there and how does it compare with A-level, do you have to learn equations and do lots of maths calculations. How is it different to Biology A-level, is it mostly learning cycles, like photosynthesis. Sorry for all the questions but as much detail about the course would be great.
In my university, a lot and a lot of writing lab reports and essays. I thought I could finally escape essay writing after graduating hs but it came back to bite my a s s
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