Yelena Icefaren
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What are the pros and cons to an integrated masters over a separate post grad masters?
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vicvic38
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Integrated master programs mean that your undergrad is technically 4 years (as you don't graduate until you get your masters,) so you receive your undergrad maintenance for all 4 years.
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MagnumKoishi
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Pros-

-it's shorter. A separate master's is usually 2 years, adding up to an extra year.
-you can get funding from student finance for the duration of the course
-you don't have to worry about applying and being accepted to universities twice. Once you're in, your master's is guaranteed so long as you do reasonably well in your exams (unis often like a 2:1 or above to continue to the fourth year).

Cons-
-you're stuck at the same university; you don't get to go elsewhere. This is only a con if you don't like your university though, and I'd imagine you'd leave after 3 years in that case anyway.


So basically an integrated master's is almost always a better option if you have the opportunity. It has the same status as a regular master's
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vicvic38
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Pros-

-it's shorter. A separate master's is usually 2 years, adding up to an extra year.
-you can get funding from student finance for the duration of the course
-you don't have to worry about applying and being accepted to universities twice. Once you're in, your master's is guaranteed so long as you do reasonably well in your exams (unis often like a 2:1 or above to continue to the fourth year).

Cons-
-you're stuck at the same university; you don't get to go elsewhere. This is only a con if you don't like your university though, and I'd imagine you'd leave after 3 years in that case anyway.


So basically an integrated master's is almost always a better option if you have the opportunity. It has the same status as a regular master's
You can also always choose to graduate after 3 years to receive your BA and reapply for a separate masters elsewhere.
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Yelena Icefaren
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
Pros-

-it's shorter. A separate master's is usually 2 years, adding up to an extra year.
-you can get funding from student finance for the duration of the course
-you don't have to worry about applying and being accepted to universities twice. Once you're in, your master's is guaranteed so long as you do reasonably well in your exams (unis often like a 2:1 or above to continue to the fourth year).

Cons-
-you're stuck at the same university; you don't get to go elsewhere. This is only a con if you don't like your university though, and I'd imagine you'd leave after 3 years in that case anyway.


So basically an integrated master's is almost always a better option if you have the opportunity. It has the same status as a regular master's
Is it valued the same by employers or do they assume it's easier?
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by vicvic38)
You can also always choose to graduate after 3 years to receive your BA and reapply for a separate masters elsewhere.
You can do, hence it not really being much of a con
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vicvic38
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(Original post by Felicity Marx)
Is it valued the same by employers or do they assume it's easier?
Same value.
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Yelena Icefaren
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(Original post by vicvic38)
Same value.
Thanks! I'm currently on the Bsc but thinking I'll probably switch to the Mbio to make life easier than thinking about a separate masters
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Felicity Marx)
What are the pros and cons to an integrated masters over a separate post grad masters?
Funding is easier for an integrated Masters, you can do the 4th year on the same terms and the UG years. Post grad Masters are a little trickier to fund.

It's easier to begin a course on the UG Masters track and drop back to a Bachelor's degree than start on the BSc and change track to the UG Masters.

A PG masters in the UK is usually one year, not two as said above. So the total time is the same.

PG Masters tend to hold a little more prestige than UG Masters, but that's not everywhere, and not in those industries where a Masters is quite standard at entry level eg engineering.

UG Masters tend to be more a continuation of modules and more general than PG Masters, which can be much more specialist. Again, that's not a universal and anyway may not be what you want.

You can change uni to do a PG Masters, you can't change uni to complete a UG Masters.
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