Fosbourne85
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Hi,
So I’m in year 12 currently and so I’m new to the whole university thing 😅

So basically I’m taking english lit, psychology and spanish. Im interested in studying forensic psychology in the future and when i look on various uni websites they have no specific a level requirements to study the course. So what I’m wondering is, is forensic psychology a course you can study straight after a levels or do you have to get a degree in psychology frst to be able to graduate and then do forensic psychology.
If so are my a levels right to study psychology?
Sorry if this is confusing, i cant explain my self properly but if you get the gist please do explain whatever you can 🤣

Many thanks
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harrysbar
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You will need to do a normal Psychology degree and then a postgraduate qualification in Forensic Psychology. Your A level subjects are fine for the vast majority of unis, but you also need to check that you meet their GCSE requirements too as some of them will require a grade 5 in maths, for example.

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...c-psychologist
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Fosbourne85
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(Original post by harrysbar)
You will need to do a normal Psychology degree and then a postgraduate qualification in Forensic Psychology. Your A level subjects are fine for the vast majority of unis, but you also need to check that you meet their GCSE requirements too as some of them will require a grade 5 in maths, for example.

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...c-psychologist
Ah ok, thanks, yeah because i was confused because i had the right a level requirements for forensic psychology but was worried they wouldnt be right for a psychology degree, which is backwards and doesnt make sense 😅, but cool that makes sense now
Thanks 👍
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Nerol
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(Original post by Fosbourne85)
Hi,
So I’m in year 12 currently and so I’m new to the whole university thing 😅

So basically I’m taking english lit, psychology and spanish. Im interested in studying forensic psychology in the future and when i look on various uni websites they have no specific a level requirements to study the course. So what I’m wondering is, is forensic psychology a course you can study straight after a levels or do you have to get a degree in psychology frst to be able to graduate and then do forensic psychology.
If so are my a levels right to study psychology?
Sorry if this is confusing, i cant explain my self properly but if you get the gist please do explain whatever you can 🤣

Many thanks
Hi!

There are undergraduate programs in forensic psychology, but honestly I would recommend doing a straight psychology degree or psychology and counselling or similar as an undergrad degree. Make sure it is accredited by the BPS as you will need this if you want to progress in the field of psychology. After your undergrad, you can then do a postgraduate qualification in forensic psychology should you choose to go down that route. It's better to start broad and then specialise at postgraduate level when it comes to psychology, unless you are completely set on a specific job. There are a LOT of areas within psychology in which you can specialise.

Hope this helps!

Loren
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Fosbourne85
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(Original post by Nerol)
Hi!

There are undergraduate programs in forensic psychology, but honestly I would recommend doing a straight psychology degree or psychology and counselling or similar as an undergrad degree. Make sure it is accredited by the BPS as you will need this if you want to progress in the field of psychology. After your undergrad, you can then do a postgraduate qualification in forensic psychology should you choose to go down that route. It's better to start broad and then specialise at postgraduate level when it comes to psychology, unless you are completely set on a specific job. There are a LOT of areas within psychology in which you can specialise.

Hope this helps!

Loren
Thank you very much for your help, this has cleared up a lot for me
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BigEasy
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(Original post by Fosbourne85)
Hi,
So I’m in year 12 currently and so I’m new to the whole university thing 😅

So basically I’m taking english lit, psychology and spanish. Im interested in studying forensic psychology in the future and when i look on various uni websites they have no specific a level requirements to study the course. So what I’m wondering is, is forensic psychology a course you can study straight after a levels or do you have to get a degree in psychology frst to be able to graduate and then do forensic psychology.
If so are my a levels right to study psychology?
Sorry if this is confusing, i cant explain my self properly but if you get the gist please do explain whatever you can 🤣

Many thanks
English lit might be useful, obviously psychology will be but Spanish maybe not so much. Might be better to do another science or math? There’s quite a bit of stats in a good psych course.

To be a forensic psych you need an Psych degree that’s accredited by the BPS - you’ll then need an accredited masters degree in forensic psychology. After that, you need a trainee forensic psychologist role and after your time is done in that I think you can apply for jobs - there may even be routes from trainee straight into a job, but it’s competitive.
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Rajshi
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Hello! I've been wanting to get into criminal psy fields to work for juvenile crime actively. I have a legal background and now am considering psy postgrad for this in UK. Should I go for MSc in Forensic Psy (BPS accredited) and then find my way into working for juvenile delinquents or would it be better to do MSc Criminology & Crim Justice and then doctorate in forensic psychology for licensing later?
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by Rajshi)
Hello! I've been wanting to get into criminal psy fields to work for juvenile crime actively. I have a legal background and now am considering psy postgrad for this in UK. Should I go for MSc in Forensic Psy (BPS accredited) and then find my way into working for juvenile delinquents or would it be better to do MSc Criminology & Crim Justice and then doctorate in forensic psychology for licensing later?
It's 'young offenders', not 'juvenile delinquents'.

And it depends which specific role you're looking at working in. I don't know that much about criminology but if your background is in law and you want to go into Forensic Psychology, you'll have to complete a conversion course in Psychology first. Then you can either complete an accredited MSc in Forensic Psychology (Stage 1) and the Stage 2 BPS Qualification, or complete a PhD in Forensic Psychology which is both Stage 1 and Stage 2 combined.
Last edited by bones-mccoy; 3 months ago
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Rajshi
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(Original post by bones-mccoy)
It's 'young offenders', not 'juvenile delinquents'.

And it depends which specific role you're looking at working as. I don't know that much about criminology but if your background is in law and you want to go into Forensic Psychology, you'll have to complete a conversion course in Psychology first. Then you can either complete an accredited MSc in Forensic Psychology (Stage 1) and the Stage 2 BPS Qualification, or complete a PhD in Forensic Psychology which is both Stage 1 and Stage 2 combined.
Thanks for the correction!

I actually have been looking to work with young offenders - profiling, understanding criminal deviations, assisting police with psychological profiles and behaviors etc sort of a thing. As an international student, how does the conversion course work, why do I need it? What if I go for a MA in Forensic Psy?

As a lawyer, will the MA/MSc Forensic Psy work better for me or MSc in Crimology & Crim Justice. If latter, can I do a doctorate in forensic psy after that to get accredited?
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by Rajshi)
Thanks for the correction!

I actually have been looking to work with young offenders - profiling, understanding criminal deviations, assisting police with psychological profiles and behaviors etc sort of a thing. As an international student, how does the conversion course work, why do I need it? What if I go for a MA in Forensic Psy?

As a lawyer, will the MA/MSc Forensic Psy work better for me or MSc in Crimology & Crim Justice. If latter, can I do a doctorate in forensic psy after that to get accredited?
You'd need a conversion course before starting a more specialised MSc as you don't have any psychology background. Most institutions will ask for either an undergraduate degree in psychology/similar social-science based subject or the equivalent conversion course as you'd struggle with the MSc without one. The conversion course will give you Graduate Basis for membership of the BPS, same as the undergrad would, which is also a requirement for most specialised MSc's.

Imo it would pointless in doing an MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice if you want to become a Forensic Psychologist, you might as well just do the conversion course, then a MSc in Forensic Psychology (plus the Stage 2) or the doctorate. Also, you'd either work for the police or actually with young offenders in a YOI - it would be one or the other rather than both.
Last edited by bones-mccoy; 3 months ago
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Lord Asriel
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(Original post by Rajshi)
I actually have been looking to work with young offenders - profiling, understanding criminal deviations, assisting police with psychological profiles and behaviors etc sort of a thing. As an international student, how does the conversion course work, why do I need it? What if I go for a MA in Forensic Psy?
Bones-McCoy is spot on regarding the fact you would need to have BPS Psychology Degree level accreditation ( bet it 1 year Msc or Conversion course) then additional Forensic Psychology postgraduate training. Realistically, you would be looking at 5 years plus if you wanted to go down that road from where you are now.

However, based on what you have written it doesn't sound like you understand the role of the Forensic Psychologist very much, and it sounds like you have a Hollywoodised view of what the job entails. There is very little profiling, assisting the police, or understanding the minds of killers. Having worked in forensic settings in the past (albeit over 10 years ago) I can tell you there is a lot more of assessment, rehabilitation work, staff management and involvement with judicial system bureaucracy.

The thing that is clear to me is that you really do need to speak to an actual forensic psychologist to get a clearer understanding of the job before you spend a lot of money for a job you may not actually like very much.
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Rajshi
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
Bones-McCoy is spot on regarding the fact you would need to have BPS Psychology Degree level accreditation ( bet it 1 year Msc or Conversion course) then additional Forensic Psychology postgraduate training. Realistically, you would be looking at 5 years plus if you wanted to go down that road from where you are now.

However, based on what you have written it doesn't sound like you understand the role of the Forensic Psychologist very much, and it sounds like you have a Hollywoodised view of what the job entails. There is very little profiling, assisting the police, or understanding the minds of killers. Having worked in forensic settings in the past (albeit over 10 years ago) I can tell you there is a lot more of assessment, rehabilitation work, staff management and involvement with judicial system bureaucracy.

The thing that is clear to me is that you really do need to speak to an actual forensic psychologist to get a clearer understanding of the job before you spend a lot of money for a job you may not actually like very much.
Thanks Lord Asriel!

I think I agree with both of you here.. I'll try to find a licensed forensic psychologist and get a clearer understanding of the job prospects.

Given that I have outlined my interests and the kind of work I want to do, do you think it'll be better for me to pursue MSc in Criminology & Crim Justice? And see how I navigate my way through? Or is there any other course that I should be doing, any recommendations?
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by Rajshi)
Thanks Lord Asriel!

I think I agree with both of you here.. I'll try to find a licensed forensic psychologist and get a clearer understanding of the job prospects.

Given that I have outlined my interests and the kind of work I want to do, do you think it'll be better for me to pursue MSc in Criminology & Crim Justice? And see how I navigate my way through? Or is there any other course that I should be doing, any recommendations?
If you train to become a Forensic Psychologist, you'll most likely end up working in prisons, in the community or secure hospitals. Some do end up assisting the police but that's more as an ad-hoc consulting role when you've gained many years of experience. The largest employer of Forensic Psychologists in the UK is HMPPS.

Day to day tasks would involve carrying out interventions alongside intervention facilitators, implementing and reviewing offender treatment programmes, completing risk assessments, supervising trainee forensic psychologists, sitting on parole boards, research, training other staff to support them in areas such as stress management, bullying, self harm etc and sometimes provide witness testimony in court.

From my understanding, a Criminologist role is much more research based. You'd research the reasons why people offend, advise policy makers and police, analyse data, and work on crime reduction and rehabilitation. It's almost like doing the theory-based groundwork to see how society, policy and other factors influence, and contribute to, offending behaviour.
Last edited by bones-mccoy; 3 months ago
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