How much do you have to like a subject to do it at uni? Watch

RareNebulas
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Currently torn between doing Chemistry or Chinese at university, I think I would enjoy Chinese more, however I do still enjoy chemistry just not to the extent that I think I would Chinese. I think chemistry would be a more useful degree and the universities I am looking at allow you to do Chinese on the side anyway. Should I do what I am more passionate about or something I am less passionate about but I think would be better for me?
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MythicalFaith
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do what you’re passionate about otherwise you won’t even get through uni for the amount of years the course is. you learn much better when you’re passionate about something instead of forcing yourself to do it. It would be even better if you could do both if you’re genuinely somewhat interested in chemistry.

I find watching documentaires and programmes related to a subject (such as chemistry for you) makes me more interested in a subject and want to study it more.
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Helloworld_95
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Honestly, I would do Chemistry. You can always study Chinese on top of Chemistry, you can't really do the opposite, and definitely not in a way where your Chemistry knowledge would be considered valuable.

Chinese is also a fairly useless language to have as far as skills go as any Chinese business you would be interacting with is going to have a top notch translator on hand already, and its value is diminishing as the English level of Chinese people improves further and foreign businesses are moving elsewhere. So as a result your degree also has less value compared to other language graduates.
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RareNebulas
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
Honestly, I would do Chemistry. You can always study Chinese on top of Chemistry, you can't really do the opposite, and definitely not in a way where your Chemistry knowledge would be considered valuable.

Chinese is also a fairly useless language to have as far as skills go as any Chinese business you would be interacting with is going to have a top notch translator on hand already, and its value is diminishing as the English level of Chinese people improves further and foreign businesses are moving elsewhere. So as a result your degree also has less value compared to other language graduates.
your right, language learning is a passion of mine but I do enjoy chemistry to some extent. Thanks
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