Why do most SEN students fail passing GCSE maths and English? Watch

GAMER12
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Isn't it funny the government are investing in to SEN education but it doesnt seem to do anything when it comes to GCSE results

Only 10% of all SEN STUDENTS got a 5 in eng/maths in the 2018 exams comapred to non sen students which was 48%
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xxjessxx20
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The exam might be too hard for their ability and probably aren’t getting much help than they need to.
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Joinedup
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What do you think the proportion should be? if someone's categorised as SEN it should mean that they're having problems.
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YaliaV
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Not everything can be measured by GCSE passes. You’re paining a very simplistic picture.
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claireestelle
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(Original post by GAMER12)
Isn't it funny the government are investing in to SEN education but it doesnt seem to do anything when it comes to GCSE results

Only 10% of all SEN STUDENTS got a 5 in eng/maths in the 2018 exams comapred to non sen students which was 48%
Theres barely any funding these days so the supports not there.
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999tigger
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Do you think it could be because they have special educational needs, which makes exams quite difficult for them?
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GAMER12
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(Original post by Joinedup)
What do you think the proportion should be? if someone's categorised as SEN it should mean that they're having problems.
It should be around 20% becuase 10% is just embarrassing for the 6th wealthiest country in the world.

Futhermore, I have Mild SEND and i felt so alone in school becuase i was one of 3 SEND student in my school to get a 5 or above in maths/ Englsih

Got a 6 in both English lang/lit and maths
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xxjessxx20
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In my school the SEN teachers are very patience with the children they are working with. But most of the kids in there either have difficulty reading, writing and other stuff. But none of them are actually like disabled. My school atm are going on budget cuts as they are that poor.

But I think Proper SEN children should go to a school for them. There is one that I know that they don’t do GCSEs but they pick like a career and they might start learning about it for like 2 weeks. Some pick drama, hair dressing etc
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GAMER12
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(Original post by xxjessxx20)
In my school the SEN teachers are very patience with the children they are working with. But most of the kids in there either have difficulty reading, writing and other stuff. But none of them are actually like disabled. My school atm are going on budget cuts as they are that poor.

But I think Proper SEN children should go to a school for them. There is one that I know that they don’t do GCSEs but they pick like a career and they might start learning about it for like 2 weeks. Some pick drama, hair dressing etc
How is it measured and why isn't there reports on this by the government. Yes, i know SEN schools are non mainstream and all but why doesn't the gov talk about ?

Btw , What do these students do after 16 ? . Do they have to take a level 1 qualification and take the long way to gaining GCSE's
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xxjessxx20
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(Original post by GAMER12)
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How is it measured and why isn't there reports on this by the government. Yes, i know SEN schools are non mainstream and all but why doesn't the gov talk about ?

Btw , What do these students do after 16 ? . Do they have to take a level 1 qualification and take the long way to gaining GCSE's
Tbh I have no clue about what they do after the age of 16.
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OctoberRain7
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(Original post by xxjessxx20)
In my school the SEN teachers are very patience with the children they are working with. But most of the kids in there either have difficulty reading, writing and other stuff. But none of them are actually like disabled. My school atm are going on budget cuts as they are that poor.

But I think Proper SEN children should go to a school for them. There is one that I know that they don’t do GCSEs but they pick like a career and they might start learning about it for like 2 weeks. Some pick drama, hair dressing etc
There are no “proper” and “not proper” disabled children, there are different degrees of help that people need and people have widely different needs. Everyone who is classified as SEN has some kind of disability, you may not see something like dyslexia as a disability but it is one. I agree that people should go to a special school if it is the best place for them but a lot of SEN children are more than capable of doing GCSEs however will need extra support (e.g. kids with ADHD who could be very smart but have trouble concentrating in class). And I really don’t think that learning about a career for two weeks is an appropriate replacement for GCSEs
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by GAMER12)
Isn't it funny the government are investing in to SEN education but it doesnt seem to do anything when it comes to GCSE results

Only 10% of all SEN STUDENTS got a 5 in eng/maths in the 2018 exams comapred to non sen students which was 48%
Over the last couple of years, there have been big real terms cuts to SEN funding in schools. Last year's GCSE cohorts will have born the brunt of that during their secondary education.

5-10 years ago, many schools could run very small bottom sets with <10 pupils, plus a teacher and a TA in maths and English, giving pupils the intervention they needed. In many schools, these sets will now be 15-20 pupils or more, and often one teacher and no TA unless there's a pupil with an ECHP.

Schools now have to fund the first £6000 of a student's SEN support themselves. In some parts of the country, this actually leads to a shortfall in funding of £1000+. The school then faces a choice of either not supporting the SEN student properly, or taking funding from another pot.

It's also become a lot harder for SEN students to e.g. get extra time in exams.

I think you're also missing the point that to be diagnosed with SEN, you necessarily have a learning need which means you have a barrier to learning that your peers don't. Even with all the intervention in the world, some students will never reach a grade 5. For some students, getting a grade 2 or 3 represents a lot of hard work from them and the school.

Yes, there are some students with SEN who are capable of achieving top grades as long as the right support is in place, but these are the minority, not the majority of SEN students.

It's also worth noting that some SEN students will struggle with attendance as a direct or indirect result of their SEN. Some will also struggle with being in a normal classroom environment due to their SEN, so will miss out on the input of specialist teachers. Some won't get the right SEN support in place until a few years (or more) into school, and will have effectively missed out on a year or more of their education.
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GAMER12
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Over the last couple of years, there have been big real terms cuts to SEN funding in schools. Last year's GCSE cohorts will have born the brunt of that during their secondary education.

5-10 years ago, many schools could run very small bottom sets with <10 pupils, plus a teacher and a TA in maths and English, giving pupils the intervention they needed. In many schools, these sets will now be 15-20 pupils or more, and often one teacher and no TA unless there's a pupil with an ECHP.

Schools now have to fund the first £6000 of a student's SEN support themselves. In some parts of the country, this actually leads to a shortfall in funding of £1000+. The school then faces a choice of either not supporting the SEN student properly, or taking funding from another pot.

It's also become a lot harder for SEN students to e.g. get extra time in exams.

I think you're also missing the point that to be diagnosed with SEN, you necessarily have a learning need which means you have a barrier to learning that your peers don't. Even with all the intervention in the world, some students will never reach a grade 5. For some students, getting a grade 2 or 3 represents a lot of hard work from them and the school.

Yes, there are some students with SEN who are capable of achieving top grades as long as the right support is in place, but these are the minority, not the majority of SEN students.

It's also worth noting that some SEN students will struggle with attendance as a direct or indirect result of their SEN. Some will also struggle with being in a normal classroom environment due to their SEN, so will miss out on the input of specialist teachers. Some won't get the right SEN support in place until a few years (or more) into school, and will have effectively missed out on a year or more of their education.
I completely agree and what u raised is the issue for SEN students and how they are failed by the education system.

I feel like we need to at create a different qualification for SEN students that is respected for colleges / Uni instead of Fuctional skills.

We should have a special GCSE eng and maths for SEND students so they get the best of there education and learn new skills that will benefit them in the future .

Funding for SEND students needs a increase and i am hoping Boris's Spending splurge aids the funding the shcool needa to help SEND students so they could do there absolute best in education and have the best chance in life
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by GAMER12)
I completely agree and what u raised is the issue for SEN students and how they are failed by the education system.

I feel like we need to at create a different qualification for SEN students that is respected for colleges / Uni instead of Fuctional skills.

We should have a special GCSE eng and maths for SEND students so they get the best of there education and learn new skills that will benefit them in the future .

Funding for SEND students needs a increase and i am hoping Boris's Spending splurge aids the funding the shcool needa to help SEND students so they could do there absolute best in education and have the best chance in life
I hope that Boris' proposals do help- I'm concerned that they are completely unfunded, and need to be thought through more clearly. I think a debate needs to be had as to whether inclusion is still the way forwards for all SEND students, and how to manage the inclusion of multiple pupils with competing needs in the same classes.

I disagree with the idea of separate "SEN" qualifications. I do think the current exams should be made more accessible to everyone- I think it's a joke that you can be very literate and not get a 5 in English language. I think we need an English language GCSE that reflects pure literacy skills, and then put all the stuff about inference and interpreting complex texts into the lit exam. With maths, I do think the papers should use language that is accessible to all.

Personally, I also think that terminal exams also disadvantage many SEN students.

However, there will always be some people who don't pass their exams, and due to the very nature of SEND, people with SEND will be over-represented in this group.

We do need to make sure we can make an inclusive society with useful roles for people who will never achieve a pass in their GCSEs.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by GAMER12)
It should be around 20% becuase 10% is just embarrassing for the 6th wealthiest country in the world.

Futhermore, I have Mild SEND and i felt so alone in school becuase i was one of 3 SEND student in my school to get a 5 or above in maths/ Englsih

Got a 6 in both English lang/lit and maths
What's your reasoning behind this 20% figure?
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