Do universities still frown upon A Level law? Watch

Tolgarda
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Well, the question is in the title.

I've seen some A Level law papers, and they look just as academically rigorous as more traditional A Level subjects like English literature or history.

I think it's time that the overall perception of A Level law was given a boost. I still see some people discouraging others from taking A Level law when they are deciding what subjects to take for a law degree.
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MidgetFever
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There's nothing wrong with taking A-level law, but I think they prefer those that are going into a law degree to go in with a fresh mind.

The way A-level law is taught is extremely different to the way it's taught at university level. At A-level law you're encouraged to learn the cases with mnemonics and can get away with looking at minimal online case summaries. Whereas at university they encourage you to read the actual case transcripts and develop an opinion on the more controversial aspects of the case, as well as evaluating these aspects.

I think it's just a case of the massive leap there is, A-level law students tend to teach themselves the same way they're used to; through mnemonics, which just isn't an effective way to learn for what they're expecting of you.
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by MidgetFever)
There's nothing wrong with taking A-level law, but I think they prefer those that are going into a law degree to go in with a fresh mind.

The way A-level law is taught is extremely different to the way it's taught at university level. At A-level law you're encouraged to learn the cases with mnemonics and can get away with looking at minimal online case summaries. Whereas at university they encourage you to read the actual case transcripts and develop an opinion on the more controversial aspects of the case, as well as evaluating these aspects.

I think it's just a case of the massive leap there is, A-level law students tend to teach themselves the same way they're used to; through mnemonics, which just isn't an effective way to learn for what they're expecting of you.
Isn't there a huge leap between any subject at Level 3 and its degree-level equivalent? Maybe students do the same for English literature when structuring essays (I know my teacher has before), but this doesn't stop it from being an actual requirement.
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OR321
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Personally I think Law is a great subject to do and shouldn’t be frowned upon. However, most top unis have preferred subjects that they want their students to do, and they usually are the maths and the sciences subjects.
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by OR321)
Personally I think Law is a great subject to do and shouldn’t be frowned upon. However, most top unis have preferred subjects that they want their students to do, and they usually are the maths and the sciences subjects.
Not really? If you want to do an English degree at Oxford or Cambridge, they expect you to have taken English literature or literature and language at A Level. If you do an MFL degree, you better hope that you've studied a language at A Level.

LSE accepts many non-STEM subjects.

Even sociology has been listed as a ‘preferred’ subject lol.
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OR321
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(Original post by Tolgarda)
Not really? If you want to do an English degree at Oxford or Cambridge, they expect you to have taken English literature or literature and language at A Level. If you do an MFL degree, you better hope that you've studied a language at A Level.

LSE accepts many non-STEM subjects.

Even sociology has been listed as a ‘preferred’ subject lol.
Yeah I get your point. For some reason Law isn’t needed to do it at uni. Like, I do Business in uni, but the requirements wasn’t business, but was atleast one maths or a science.
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Tolgarda
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(Original post by OR321)
Yeah I get your point. For some reason Law isn’t needed to do it at uni. Like, I do Business in uni, but the requirements wasn’t business, but was atleast one maths or a science.
Ah, I see. I get your drift.

And while it is true that law doesn't have any required subjects, I am just curious as to why this has to be one of the avoided ones.
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makeup
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(Original post by OR321)
Yeah I get your point. For some reason Law isn’t needed to do it at uni. Like, I do Business in uni, but the requirements wasn’t business, but was atleast one maths or a science.
What uni do u go to?
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swanseajack1
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(Original post by OR321)
Personally I think Law is a great subject to do and shouldn’t be frowned upon. However, most top unis have preferred subjects that they want their students to do, and they usually are the maths and the sciences subjects.
Both UCL and LSE have Law on their preferred subject list and I suspect other universities will treat it similarly. The preferred subject list differs according to the university but will usually include Ancient History, Classical Civilisation, Computer Science, Economics, English, Geography, History, Law, Politics, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology and Foreign Languages in addition to Maths and Sciences. Sometimes they include Accounting, Art, Business, Geology and Music as well as others.
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OR321
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(Original post by makeup)
What uni do u go to?
Mmu. But I remember applying to Uni of Man and Liverpool and those were the requirement. I didn’t actually get in them 😂
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The RAR
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Do you want to apply for Law? Law is getting more and more saturated by the day, everyone around me wants to or are doing law. I admit I myself first wanted to do Law but ditched last minute because:
1. Unless it's a sick uni like LSE or Oxbridge, won't hold much value
2. Over-saturation, which means jobs are hella competitive
3. It's boring AF
Last edited by The RAR; 4 weeks ago
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