Anonymous #1
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So I have received my timetable for Uni, I don't want to sound like a rotten teenager for thinking like this about Uni.

I have a one hour lecture in one day, but its more of how I travel to uni which is by getting on the bus for like 45 mins to and hour and return time too. If I was within like walking distance of the Uni I would be more than happy to turn up to the lecture.

However I think during this day I would just work from home if possible. Am I thinking unreasonably if I were to skip the one hour and try to work at home during this one hour (I am in every day of the week too which I am fine with since all my other lectures are 2+ hours)?

I can give better clarification if there is something you don't understand.

Thanks!
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OR321
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I don’t think you should start missing lectures straight away. Go to the first few weeks or ask your uni. Tell them you commute so is their any other times you could come to the same lecture. They’ll sort something out for ya.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by OR321)
I don’t think you should start missing lectures straight away. Go to the first few weeks or ask your uni. Tell them you commute so is their any other times you could come to the same lecture. They’ll sort something out for ya.
I was thinking not straight away, like ill turn up to the first few on the days i have that one hour lecture. but I just see that its going to be a massive inconvenience later, but I may ask about it. Thank you for the good response!
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OR321
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I was thinking not straight away, like ill turn up to the first few on the days i have that one hour lecture. but I just see that its going to be a massive inconvenience later, but I may ask about it. Thank you for the good response!
It’s okay. I just started uni too and I commute. I have a decent timetable but on one day I have a 4 hours break between two 1 hour sessions so it is quite annoying
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by OR321)
It’s okay. I just started uni too and I commute. I have a decent timetable but on one day I have a 4 hours break between two 1 hour sessions so it is quite annoying
That's awful. I can't comprehend why they would do that. If you like lived next to the uni it would legit be no problem, but it's as if they don't consider people who may commute. However I guess its what you signed up for basically.

Thing is I am doing a foundation year and people say first year of uni is abit of a screw around year, but i would technically have two first years if that makes sense?

However I see that as it just won't be as difficult to start off immediately which helps for you to settle in better.
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OR321
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(Original post by Anonymous)
That's awful. I can't comprehend why they would do that. If you like lived next to the uni it would legit be no problem, but it's as if they don't consider people who may commute. However I guess its what you signed up for basically.

Thing is I am doing a foundation year and people say first year of uni is abit of a screw around year, but i would technically have two first years if that makes sense?

However I see that as it just won't be as difficult to start off immediately which helps for you to settle in better.
Yeah that’s true. Good luck though
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Andrew97
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There’s too many people doing too many courses for everyone to get a nice rosy timetable. I commuted in, took about an hour, even for shorter days. Yes, the gaps are irritating but you just have to lump it or go home I’m afraid.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by OR321)
Yeah that’s true. Good luck though
Thanks, You too!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Andrew97)
There’s too many people doing too many courses for everyone to get a nice rosy timetable. I commuted in, took about an hour, even for shorter days. Yes, the gaps are irritating but you just have to lump it or go home I’m afraid.
Yeah I think the same way. Just looking for opinions from people like yourself. I was hoping for a nice timetable, for the most part it is! Just this one friday that is legit just a one hour lecture and that is it, just abit of an inconvenience really lol.

I might see how it goes for that one day and see if it would be possible to work on that hour lecture from home, im new to uni stuff so hopefully I am not thinking like an idiot or something.
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Sataris
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You could do some work at uni for a few hours before/afterwards so you're not just there for the lecture?
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R1C3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
That's awful. I can't comprehend why they would do that. If you like lived next to the uni it would legit be no problem, but it's as if they don't consider people who may commute. However I guess its what you signed up for basically.

Thing is I am doing a foundation year and people say first year of uni is abit of a screw around year, but i would technically have two first years if that makes sense?

However I see that as it just won't be as difficult to start off immediately which helps for you to settle in better.
That's how it goes- many people on my course throughout the last few years have had to commute for very short lectures.
But there really isn't a great deal stopping people from getting accommodation close to their University- you're going to be paying your loan back at the same rate regardless of how much you rack up. Plus most Universities guarantee first years very close accommodation.

As for the 'screw around year', do not fall into the trap of believing that misconception. If you fall behind in first year, you will fall behind in the following years; the information taught in first year is usually the basis of everything else you will learn.

(Original post by OR321)
It’s okay. I just started uni too and I commute. I have a decent timetable but on one day I have a 4 hours break between two 1 hour sessions so it is quite annoying
I'd get used to that if I were you. Last year, I had one day where I had to be up for a 1 hour 9AM lecture- and then wouldn't be back until 3PM.
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Welshvisitor
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Don’t skip lectures. They are there for a reason! Learn to fill in gaps and use travel productively, listen to a recording of a lecture if that’s allowed etc ( recorded lectures anyway. It was very useful ).
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Sataris)
You could do some work at uni for a few hours before/afterwards so you're not just there for the lecture?
I have a computer at home you see (gaming PC that im on like almost all the time I guess).

(Original post by R1C3)
That's how it goes- many people on my course throughout the last few years have had to commute for very short lectures.
But there really isn't a great deal stopping people from getting accommodation close to their University- you're going to be paying your loan back at the same rate regardless of how much you rack up. Plus most Universities guarantee first years very close accommodation.

As for the 'screw around year', do not fall into the trap of believing that misconception. If you fall behind in first year, you will fall behind in the following years; the information taught in first year is usually the basis of everything else you will learn.


I'd get used to that if I were you. Last year, I had one day where I had to be up for a 1 hour 9AM lecture- and then wouldn't be back until 3PM.
I mean I really do not want to screw around, not my intention at all. I also didn't really move out because I didn't think it would be worth it...yet. I was going to move to the uni after the foundation year perhaps when it may start to get abit more serious. Thanks for the good response, its kind of a reality check that I will have to come to terms with
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Welshvisitor)
Don’t skip lectures. They are there for a reason! Learn to fill in gaps and use travel productively, listen to a recording of a lecture if that’s allowed etc ( recorded lectures anyway. It was very useful ).
The only reason I was thinking this, is because I have a PC at home that I am on all the time! I was mostly thinking of it as a way to work at home just for that lecture to kind of get past the inconvenience? but i will turn up to the lectures at first to see if they get recorded online or something.
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Andrew97
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yeah I think the same way. Just looking for opinions from people like yourself. I was hoping for a nice timetable, for the most part it is! Just this one friday that is legit just a one hour lecture and that is it, just abit of an inconvenience really lol.

I might see how it goes for that one day and see if it would be possible to work on that hour lecture from home, im new to uni stuff so hopefully I am not thinking like an idiot or something.
You’d be surprised at the number of people who bunk lecturers. I once had a one where there should have been around 80 people, 2 of us turned up. It’s good to get into the habit of turning up to things as this would be required at work.

In 3 years I think I skipped 4 lectures overall. 2 because I was being sick the night before, 1 because I had a hospital appointment. And only 1 due to a commute issue. It was snowing and all trains had all the cancellations. And I was going to miss it anyway.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Andrew97)
You’d be surprised at the number of people who bunk lecturers. I once had a one where there should have been around 80 people, 2 of us turned up. It’s good to get into the habit of turning up to things as this would be required at work.

In 3 years I think I skipped 4 lectures overall. 2 because I was being sick the night before, 1 because I had a hospital appointment. And only 1 due to a commute issue. It was snowing and all trains had all the cancellations. And I was going to miss it anyway.
Logically I would just think if I can make up for it somehow it may be fine? Like i mentioned earlier, it is completely possible for me to do homework since I have a PC at home that I use a lot. But i guess being given a explanation by a human is better than written stuff sometimes if you know what i mean?
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martin7
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Logically I would just think if I can make up for it somehow it may be fine? Like i mentioned earlier, it is completely possible for me to do homework since I have a PC at home that I use a lot. But i guess being given a explanation by a human is better than written stuff sometimes if you know what i mean?
If you're present at a lecture you can put your hand up and ask questions, and engage with other students straight after the lecture to discuss things you weren't sure about. OK, so you can do the latter the following day, but sometimes it's better to do that when things are fresh in your mind.
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Jehaan
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So I commute also (1.5hrs each way) and I am in my third year. The advice I would give you is DON'T GIVE UP. Once you start the trend of missing lectures, it doesn't stop. I often experienced a similar situation but on those days I would make myself sit in the library and do the majority of my work on those days and go home earlier intensive days. I also try to do useful things on my commute which may not necessarily be academic. For example, I am president of a scheme so I would do texts and emails arranging things on the way or I would work on my lecture organisation spreadsheet. Things which are not actually learning but contribute to my learning and I would waste time on otherwise. This year I am hoping to practice lecture flashcards everyday to build up long term memory of content.
GOOD LUCK it may be a hard road but for me its worth it as I really do not have the money to live in London as I get the minimum maintenance loan which wouldn't even cover my rent. I am sure your reasons will make it worth it for you
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R1C3
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(Original post by Jehaan)
This year I am hoping to practice lecture flashcards everyday to build up long term memory of content.
I could not pass up the opportunity to shout out my favourite flashcard revision program, Anki. Which I recently discovered has a companion site to view your flashcards even when not at the machine with the local copies.
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domonict
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There are lots of people doing the same lecture, not neccessarily on the same course, possibly a sessional lecturer, and a room with facilities . The uni have to juggle all of these needs to ensure that the lecture is available to all.
Assuming it's a Campus uni go to the library . Socialise (a bit) with other people on the course and talk about the lecture.
At 9 grand a year, it's 3 grand a term. Or £300 a week . Just on tuition
Each day you pay £75 to the uni. Don't be daft and not go
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