Hong Kong rioters desecrate Chinese flag

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BlueIndigoViolet
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#41
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#41
(Original post by williamho)
and at the same time, please get the British Government to hand out the UK passport and UK residency to the Hong Kong people.

If the UK Government wants to help out
2047 will be an interesting year to say the least
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Napp
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#42
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#42
(Original post by Baron of Sealand)
Innocent lives like the literal primary schoolchildren the police arrested? Or the 8 lives lost to stop the government from pushing this stupid bill?
In fairness you cant only blame the PRC for the violence there, i mean if certain hooligans start hurling molotovs and battering members of the public obviously the authorities are going to up the ante
(Original post by williamho)
and at the same time, please get the British Government to hand out the UK passport and UK residency to the Hong Kong people.

If the UK Government wants to help out
Alas there isnt a hope in hell of that happening. I mean ignoring the legality of randomly handing out passports to foreign nationals the Chinese would **** a brick at the idea and considering the financial heft of of PRC the leader of Britain would have to be utterly insane to provoke them in such a manner.
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Dadadavavaakxx
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#43
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I am kind of feeling there’s biases on both sides. We seem to have both PRC nationalists and Chinese haters here. However, there is never anybody in between. As in somebody who has looked up facts for why both China and Hong Kong are in the wrong.
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williamho
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#44
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#44
After 1997, Hong Kong has been handed over back to China.

The youth in Hong Kong are frustrated with the lack of a clear vision for their future. Cannot buy a properties in Hong Kong. Because the developers have kept the properties prices high.

Because back in 1998, the Hong Kong people protested against 85000 units of public housing being built per year. Crazy protest in 1998. So the Hong Kong government is not oblige to build public housing

And most of the Hong Kong people do not realise the way forward is to integrate with China.
As China economy is expanding, follow where the money is.
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williamho
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#45
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#45
If the Hong Kong people wants to emigrate , the Hong Kong Government does allows it. Immigration in Hong Kong has nothing to do with China policy.

This is where everyone , who have not live in Hong Kong , has their facts distorted.

Just get the British Government to hand out the UK residency. This will sort out the democracy problem,
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Napp
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#46
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#46
(Original post by williamho)

And most of the Hong Kong people do not realise the way forward is to integrate with China.
As China economy is expanding, follow where the money is.
Its slowing... besides, by that logic most of Asia should go back to being not but supplicants in the tribute system. China needs to accept the fact it is not the middle kingdom and does not have an innate right to rule Asia and that includes Hong Kong. We have all seen how badly forcible integration goes. There is a good reason the vast majority of Chinas defence budget is spent on internal policing with the giant concentration camp in the north and the disgraceful actions in tibet.
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williamho
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#47
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#47
For democracy and human rights sake

Please give out the UK residency to the protesters.

The protesters are pleading to leave Hong Kong
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luc9999
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#48
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(Original post by Greywolftwo)
Well they could if they wanted to, I think they are worried though about international recognition
and that's why they cant
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Just my opinion
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#49
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#49
Commie bot strikes again!!!!!!
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Napp
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#50
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#50
(Original post by williamho)
For democracy and human rights sake

Please give out the UK residency to the protesters.

The protesters are pleading to leave Hong Kong
Never going to happen im afraid...
(Original post by Just my opinion)
Commie bot strikes again!!!!!!
Its bloody carpet bombing now...
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Ascend
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#51
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#51
(Original post by williamho)
For democracy and human rights sake

Please give out the UK residency to the protesters.

The protesters are pleading to leave Hong Kong
Are they?

Image
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williamho
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#52
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#52
The best way for the Hong Kong protestors to gain UK residency.

Is to fly over to the UK. And once landed at the airport. Just say ‘Claiming political asylum ‘

All legal, democracy and human rights approved

By the way, the last number of Hong Kong protestors who has bought their air tickets are 350. But I am not too sure if the air ticket is one way. No return
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Ascend
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#53
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#53
(Original post by williamho)
The best way for the Hong Kong protestors to gain UK residency.

Is to fly over to the UK. And once landed at the airport. Just say ‘Claiming political asylum ‘

All legal, democracy and human rights approved

By the way, the last number of Hong Kong protestors who has bought their air tickets are 350. But I am not too sure if the air ticket is one way. No return
Why, is HK not good enough to be democratic and "human rights approved"?
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Nuttyy
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#54
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#54
(Original post by Baron of Sealand)
Are you the BBC?

For a text supposedly from the BBC, you have certainly added, modified, and removed plenty of the original text.

Regardless, I fully support the destruction of all the Chinese flags in Hong Kong. I only regret that I wasn't the one doing it. I wish more people, in Hong Kong or elsewhere, can be more anti-China rather than just be pro-democracy indeed.

AngryPenguin.. Care to explain this? You've just lost the grain of credibility you had. Editing a news report, then trying to pass it off as original. You're as low as the Chinese Gov tbh, wouldn't be surprised if you're hired by them, such is their level of dignity.
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Ascend
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#55
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(Original post by Nuttyy)
AngryPenguin.. Care to explain this? You've just lost the grain of credibility you had. Editing a news report, then trying to pass it off as original. You're as low as the Chinese Gov tbh, wouldn't be surprised if you're hired by them, such is their level of dignity.
He must be a Japanese shill trying to make TSR loathe the Chinese gov. It's the only rational explanation. No apologist is that counterproductive.
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Ascend
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#56
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#56
Hong Kong May Topple Communism

https://www.wsj.com/articles/hong-ko...sm-11569453043

As Hong Kong entered the 16th straight week of unrest, protesters adopted origami cranes as symbols of resistance, sang their new anthem, burned the Chinese national flag, erected barricades, threw petrol bombs and beat opponents unconscious. The protest movement in the semiautonomous region now has taken on characteristics of an insurgency as people across Hong Kong society vigorously challenge local authorities.

The 79-day “Umbrella” protest of 2014, as large as it was, had little lasting effect on Beijing, which has ruled Hong Kong as a “special administrative region” since 1997. This year’s protests are different. “China’s disintegration is now under way,” Arthur Waldron, a China historian at the University of Pennsylvania, told me last month.

In Chinese history, regimes often unravel from the outside in. “Disintegration,” Mr. Waldron told me, “begins at the limits of empire, only to grow, steadily undermining adjacent territory, until the seats of central power are imperiled.” That’s what happened in the 10th century to the mighty Tang dynasty, which, as Mr. Waldron puts it, was “mortally wounded by military disorders remote to the capital.”

Similarly, in the mid-19th century, the Qing dynasty was fatally weakened by the 14-year-long Taiping Rebellion. Starting in southern China not far from Hong Kong, the revolt—actually an attempted revolution—claimed an estimated 20 million lives and displaced tens of millions more. The Manchu Qing rulers held onto power for nearly a half-century longer but never recovered from perhaps the most destructive civil war in history.

Almost every analyst today assumes that one way or another, Beijing will prevail in the current crisis. China’s Communist Party maintains the world’s largest standing army, with more than two million personnel. Some 7,000 are already stationed in Hong Kong. The hard-core protesters dressed in black—a “guerrilla force,” according to American correspondent Michael Yon—number only in the thousands.

Yet despite appearances, Beijing is at a disadvantage. The mass of Hong Kong residents firmly oppose Beijing’s encroachments. The protests, initially over a bill that would have allowed extradition to the mainland, have widened in scope. Now the target is China itself and its effort to eliminate the “one country, two systems” arrangement that had promised Hong Kong a “high degree of autonomy.”

China’s efforts to take over Hong Kong have resulted in a shift in self-identification, especially among younger adults. A recent Hong Kong University survey shows that the share of 18- to 29-year-olds who self-identify as Hong Konger rather than Chinese or mixed has surged to about 75% from 40% a decade ago. Almost nobody in this group believes he is Chinese only. A plurality of residents of all ages now see themselves as Hong Konger only.

Changes in self-identification have fueled a still-small independence movement, which did not exist a decade ago. Whether or not Hong Kongers want to separate fully from China, Beijing has to be concerned by protesters there repeating the line from “The Hunger Games”: “If we burn, you burn with us!”

As protesters clash with police, analysts worry about another Tiananmen, the June 1989 slaughter in Beijing. Soldiers in tanks and armored personnel carriers moved to the center of the capital, killing at will.

I think Chinese leaders know that such a response is not possible this time. Hong Kong’s dense urban landscape—tall buildings and narrow roads and alleys—reduces the advantages of armor and favors defenders, who can occupy the high ground from apartment buildings. Many protesters say they’re willing to fight to the end; eight have committed suicide to dramatize their cause.

The militant demonstrators not only are determined but are becoming an effective fighting force. Mr. Yon, who has observed them from the beginning, told me the emerging contingent of youthful fighters is “breathing, growing, evolving so fast that I am having difficulty tracking its evolution.” Chinese ruler Xi Jinping surely does not want his first war to take years, kill thousands of Chinese, and end in a loss.

The authorities don’t have the ability to clear the streets, and the longer the demonstrations continue, the higher the risk they spread to the mainland. Mainlanders have already crossed the border into Hong Kong to stand with the protesters there—like one earnest young man from Guangdong province who spoke with me earlier this month in front of the Mong Kok police station. He and perhaps 1,000 Hong Kong men and women in surgical masks had squared off with riot police in Darth Vader-type helmets and visors.

The majority of mainlanders have little sympathy for Hong Kongers, but they do have grievances of their own, especially as economic growth slows and Mr. Xi enforces tighter social controls. Beijing has to be worried that ordinary Chinese will be inspired by the boldness of those in Hong Kong, who have inflicted severe political damage on Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam and forced her to announce concessions.

Protesters know Beijing is afraid of contagion and have targeted mainland tourists with messages delivered by Apple’s AirDrop app, among other means. They congregate around venues frequented by mainland tourists to press their case.

The protesters have significantly changed the political narrative in Taiwan, which Beijing also considers its rightful possession. Until the Hong Kong protests began, it looked as if a pro-Beijing figure would be elected Taiwan’s president this coming January. Now that’s unlikely. The governing Democratic Progressive Party, sometimes described as “pro-independence,” has shored up support and is expected to retain power.

There will be little for the Chinese Communist Party to celebrate Oct. 1, the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic. Its imperial project is stalling and beginning to disintegrate along the periphery.

But refugees from China’s totalitarian rule have reason to be optimistic. A friend of mine fled Mao’s army as it approached Beijing seventy years ago, eventually ending up in New Jersey. She vowed never to return to China as long as the Communist Party ruled and had given up hope of ever going back. Last week, she told my wife she now knows she will soon return. She promises to take us to her favorite restaurant in the capital for a jiaozi dinner.

Mr. Chang is author of “The Coming Collapse of China.”
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8013
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#57
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I am from HK. Very heartbroken and scared to go out, as I know that almost every district has a protest today. It is the Chinese national day.
As of now, 17 MTR stations (including the station closest to my home) and plenty of shopping malls are closed, and I am forced to close all of my windows to prevent tear smoke from entering my apartment.
Last edited by 8013; 9 months ago
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BlueIndigoViolet
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#58
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#58
Hong Kong is going to be really "interesting" in 2047 eeek....

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8013
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#59
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The stations with a cross are closed as of now.Name:  IMG_0002.JPG
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8013
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#60
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Yau Ma Tei, congratulations. You are the 18th MTR station to be closed down.
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