Labour has voted to get rid of private schools Watch

Sinnoh
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And there goes the champagne socialist vote

(Original post by Eboracum7)
I think being able to afford an average £17,000 a year per child on private education, means you're hardly a struggling family.

I don't see why some kids should get a privileged start just because mummy and daddy can dig deep into their pockets.

Merit, not money.
Commoner doesn't really mean struggling family though?
Anyway I question just how much finance would play a role - to begin with there are still entrance exams and bursaries and scholarships which are supposed to sort them by merit (even if they sometimes make a pig's ear of that - some people you wonder how the hell they ever got in). Many of the richest people at my school got average-to-bad results.
Then again my school really wasn't anything spectacular for results despite the cost.
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Oxford Mum
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(Original post by Fruli)
Exactly. There are parents who work so hard to make sure their kids go to good schools. In many cases it’s not even about privilege, it’s about priorities and hard work. Parents make huge sacrifices to get their kids into some of these schools.

Also, having the private school system helps raise standards all round, even for state schools.

I’m never voting labour again.
Just to say that I am a single parent and my kids were on free school meals at primary school, however they won scholarships and bursaries from a private school. There are no grammar schools in our area either, so they were lucky. Now this opportunity for social mobility will be lost, if Corbyn has his way. But if there is a demand for private schools and parents can and want to pay, I can't see how they can stop them.
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Fruli
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
Just to say that I am a single parent and my kids were on free school meals at primary school, however they won scholarships and bursaries from a private school. There are no grammar schools in our area either, so they were lucky. Now this opportunity for social mobility will be lost, if Corbyn has his way. But if there is a demand for private schools and parents can and want to pay, I can't see how they can stop them.
Absolutely. Parents who want the best education for their kids will find ways round it, which is even worse as it will just go underground and will indeed become a reserve for the privileged. Way to go Corbyn!
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VegetableMarvell
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Am I the only one who thinks that this is, in principle, a good idea?

Just because you're not naturally clever, doesn't mean you shouldn't be entitled to the same education as those who are rich or able to get scholarships. Plus, some kids don't have supportive families who are willing to help them with scholarships etc.

Private schools are a form of segregation, whether on class, wealth or even (in cases of scholarship) intelligence. Being around differing people from you helps forge a more well rounded perspective and creates a more open, accepting generation (both for those in private schools, and those in state schools.)
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__itertools__
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Could you also post a link to the source of this information?
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Drewski
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(Original post by VegetableMarvell)
Private schools are a form of segregation, whether on ... intelligence.
Show me a school - any school - that doesn't divide kids based on intelligence / aptitude.

Every school puts kids into sets, where they put similar abilities together.
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Drewski
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(Original post by __itertools__)
Could you also post a link to the source of this information?
It's in the thread. Post 27. Read the thing before making yourself look foolish. It's also all over the news
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Rotting Corpse
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Won't happen, too dramatic and drastic. I went to a private school and it was an amazing experience. And why target schools specifically? Pretty much our entire society is based on being able to use your money to buy what you can afford. What next, scrap mansions because not everyone can afford them? Scrap expensive food because not everyone can afford it? etc.
Last edited by Rotting Corpse; 4 weeks ago
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Palmyra
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Most independent schools are not private in that sense. You can't say a charity owns Eton. The charity is Eton, and charities are public bodies. Governments can and have interfered in how charities are run.
And if these "charities" don't like it they are more than welcome to drop the tax-related-benefits they accrue as a result of this artificial status.
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VegetableMarvell
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(Original post by Drewski)
Show me a school - any school - that doesn't divide kids based on intelligence / aptitude.

Every school puts kids into sets, where they put similar abilities together.
They're still in the same school. And it's mostly for English, Maths and Science; most state schools have mixed sets for options.
I had mixed sets for Geography, History, Food Tech, IT etc for GCSE. State school sixth forms are almost always mixed due to smaller class sizes.
Last edited by VegetableMarvell; 4 weeks ago
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username4920716
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(Original post by Eboracum7)
I think being able to afford an average £17,000 a year per child on private education, means you're hardly a struggling family.

I don't see why some kids should get a privileged start just because mummy and daddy can dig deep into their pockets.

Merit, not money.
Maybe mummy and daddy worked hard for their money?
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AngryRedhead
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#52
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Can’t say I’m that bothered by this; although in my own opinion I think it would be a better policy to increase funding to state schools and make more grammar schools rather than removing people’s choices to send their children to independent schools
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mathspaperfree
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(Original post by Fruli)
Seriously, wtf?
this isn't a good decision, how can you expect children of celebrities and rich members of society to be in the same classroom as your average kid in a state school? Their cultures will clash massively and will create chaos in schools.

If this goes through, then rich kids will be forced to be home schooled, and so they will do even better in their exams.

Then what?

will labour ban home schooling too?
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VegetableMarvell
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(Original post by mathspaperfree)
this isn't a good decision, how can you expect children of celebrities and rich members of society to be in the same classroom as your average kid in a state school? Their cultures will clash massively and will create chaos in schools.
Are you actually saying that mixing the rich and the poor will cause chaos? What are you, a 19th Century aristocrat trying to stop the Chartists? Hilarious.
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__itertools__
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(Original post by VegetableMarvell)
Am I the only one who thinks that this is, in principle, a good idea?

Just because you're not naturally clever, doesn't mean you shouldn't be entitled to the same education as those who are rich or able to get scholarships. Plus, some kids don't have supportive families who are willing to help them with scholarships etc.

Private schools are a form of segregation, whether on class, wealth or even (in cases of scholarship) intelligence. Being around differing people from you helps forge a more well rounded perspective and creates a more open, accepting generation (both for those in private schools, and those in state schools.)
Yes, you are.
What would you say to the private hospitals, for instance? Should they be banned too?

Private schools are a form of segregation does not hold water, at least now with my understanding of the term. You might go to a government funded school (say it is called Pineapple School) in your town. Doesn't that mean you do not socialise with the students going to some other school. Isn't there an isolation? The segregation you mention named wealth, class or intelligence is completely arbitrary. You, by going to the Pineapple school are promoting a segregation between Pineapplarian and non-pineapplarian.

Not to mention, what about the democratic values? Consumers should be allowed to choose the goods they think is best for them. This applies to food, clothing, gadgets and also to education.
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Drewski
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(Original post by VegetableMarvell)
They're still in the same school. And it's mostly for English, Maths and Science; most state schools have mixed sets for options.
I had mixed sets for Geography, History, Food Tech, IT etc for GCSE. State school sixth forms are almost always mixed due to smaller class sizes.
The only thing I had mixed sets for was PE. Yours seems unusual
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mathspaperfree
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y

(Original post by VegetableMarvell)
Are you actually saying that mixing the rich and the poor will cause chaos? What are you, a 19th Century aristocrat trying to stop the Chartists? Hilarious.
yes it will, the average state school kid doesn't care about school, gets mostly Ds and Cs at GCSE.
The opposite is true for kids who go to private schools.

Clearly you can't face the fact that private school children are on average smarter than state school children, (and it isn't about the quality of teaching or sizes of classes).

It starts from birth, even before that

I could go on for ages, but i haven't got all day to waste
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__itertools__
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(Original post by Drewski)
It's in the thread. Post 27. Read the thing before making yourself look foolish. It's also all over the news
Smug! How is asking a humble question being foolish?
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AngryRedhead
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(Original post by mathspaperfree)
y


yes it will, the average state school kid doesn't care about school, gets mostly Ds and Cs at GCSE.
The opposite is true for kids who go to private schools.

Clearly you can't face the fact that private school children are on average smarter than state school children, (and it isn't about the quality of teaching or sizes of classes).

It starts from birth, even before that

I could go on for ages, but i haven't got all day to waste
Private school kids aren’t more intelligent; just achieve more due to the nature of the teaching in private school. I got A’s in my GCSE’s and went to a ****e comprehensive whilst quite a few private school pupils I knew came out with C’s and D’s in their GCSE’s
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Drewski
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(Original post by __itertools__)
Smug! How is asking a humble question being foolish?
Because if you can't be arsed to be engaged in the thread properly, why do you think you'll have anything useful to add?
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