Are these topics suitable/feasible for the physics IA? Watch

reyenreyen
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Are these topics suitable/feasible for the physics IA? Why or Why not?
I have a feeling they are too simple. My personal engagement is fine with these BTW.

How does the density of the water affect the refractive index of water? I'm going to increase density by increasing salt concentration
What is the effect of changing tension on fundamental frequency of a string.
What is the effect of changing thickness/diameter on fundamental frequency of a string.

Do I need multiple graphs?
What if I'm not getting any errors?
What if there are no published results online to compare with?
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by reyenreyen)
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How does the density of the water affect the refractive index of water? I'm going to increase density by increasing salt concentration
This one isn't really suitable because your method introduces another independent variable- turbidity. Adding salt to the water makes the water slightly cloudy, which is independent of the density of the water. Unless you can prove what effect (if any) this change in turbidity has and account for it, the method isn't usable.
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reyenreyen
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(Original post by MagnumKoishi)
This one isn't really suitable because your method introduces another independent variable- turbidity. Adding salt to the water makes the water slightly cloudy, which is independent of the density of the water. Unless you can prove what effect (if any) this change in turbidity has and account for it, the method isn't usable.
MagnumKoishi
Perhaps i could use that as my error/limitation then? I'm scared of my experiment being too simple where i have no erros.

Could you also answer these two questions (if possible)? Thank you for your time.
Do I need multiple graphs?
What if there are no published results online to compare with?
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MagnumKoishi
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(Original post by reyenreyen)
MagnumKoishi
Perhaps i could use that as my error/limitation then? I'm scared of my experiment being too simple where i have no erros.

Could you also answer these two questions (if possible)? Thank you for your time.
Do I need multiple graphs?
What if there are no published results online to compare with?
You could perhaps use it as your limitation, that might not be a bad idea actually. For educational purposes it's often a good idea to purposely introduce errors lol, such as invent an anomalous result.

And you only need multiple graphs if your investigation requires multiple graphs. If it's something that can be summed up on one graph, there's no reason to have more than one.

And if published results online are required, then I'm afraid you won't be able to do the topic if you can't find any. But there should definitely be some available for the experiments you've suggested there
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reyenreyen
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MagnumKoishi


Had to change the topics.. what are your thoughts on these instead:

1. How does the density of the water affect the specific heat capacity of water (does density even affects specific heat cap? isn't specific heat capacity fixed/constant for water? )

2. Efficiency of DC Motors (too basic? haven't learnt too much in topic 5 yet...)

3. How does the coefficient of restitution affect the displacement of ball down a ramp (too basic)


are they all feasible? which one is better? are there any "planned" errors i can do?
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