dancer5678
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I am currently studying maths, further maths, economics and chemistry. I am already struggling with the workload. I feel like I should drop a subject as I would probably do better in 3 than if I spread myself over 4, but have read that some unis only accepted further maths as a fourth a level. However, I am finding the maths quite challenging and am not even sure if I want to do just a maths degree at uni, or if I want to do something else.

I also do dance outside of school for three nights a week.

I am hoping to go on to university to do a maths / Economics / finance etc related degree.

Should I:
- drop the further maths
-or drop the chemistry or economics - the reason I am worried about dropping one of these is in case unis view the maths and further maths together instead of separately
-try and push through with the four

Thanks in advance
Last edited by dancer5678; 4 weeks ago
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vicvic38
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My advice would be to decide if you wish to do a maths degree, or a Economics/Finance/Accountancy course.

If you want to do maths, having Further Maths is a must.

If you don't, it's not.

I think that would be a pretty good barometer. I've just completed my first year of a maths degree, so if you want to ask me anything to get a feel for it (as it is not too much like A level Maths or FM) then feel free.
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cheesecakelove
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(Original post by dancer5678)
I am currently studying maths, further maths, economics and chemistry. I am already struggling with the workload. I feel like I should drop a subject as I would probably do better in 3 than if I spread myself over 4, but have read that some unis only accepted further maths as a fourth a level. However, I am finding the maths quite challenging and am not even sure if I want to do just a maths degree at uni, or if I want to do something else.

I also do dance outside of school for three nights a week.

I am hoping to go on to university to do a maths / Economics / finance etc related degree.

Should I:
- drop the further maths
-or drop the chemistry or economics - the reason I am worried about dropping one of these is in case unis view the maths and further maths together instead of separately
-try and push through with the four

Thanks in advance
A lot of universities are only looking for 3 A-Levels, so if you feel doing 4 risks the quality of your work and grades, you could look into dropping a subject. Consider what is your worst subject and what you don't really need. Your subject choices indicate that you don't really need Chemistry, or if you are going down the Economics/Finance route, you could drop Further Maths (as you mention it is quite challenging). The best thing to do is to identify which degree subjects you are interested in and look at the entry requirements of the courses and universities you are interested in to help inform your choice.

Another thing to think about is if your dance is affecting your studies - you could take a break or look into reducing the amount of classes per week.
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Byun
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If you're really feeling the workload now, then best to drop a subject as it won't get any better (especially in year 13).
I would suggest dropping further maths, because of the issue that you stated, however if you really are considering to do maths at uni level, then it would be the best to keep it.
Honestly, just aim for the highest and try your best to push through the 4. You just need to sharpen up your time management skills and really remain passionate for your subjects.
Good Luck
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dancer5678
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(Original post by vicvic38)
My advice would be to decide if you wish to do a maths degree, or a Economics/Finance/Accountancy course.

If you want to do maths, having Further Maths is a must.

If you don't, it's not.

I think that would be a pretty good barometer. I've just completed my first year of a maths degree, so if you want to ask me anything to get a feel for it (as it is not too much like A level Maths or FM) then feel free.
Thanks for the advice. What is actually in a maths degree? I’ve been googling it but can’t seem to find much linked to what I’m looking for. What I mean is for your work, are you set questions to do, or is it reading or something else etc. What is the actual work like and what are the lectures like?
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Fufuyo
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I'd say keep doing further maths and drop either chem or Econ as universities really value fm the most for maths, Econ, finance, and accountancy related courses. However, only do it if u think it's doable, if you're really struggling with further maths then dropping it wouldn't be the end of the world as you could still get into quite a few good unis for these subjects without these subjects. For something like an economics degree at LSE further maths is basically essential.
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vicvic38
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(Original post by dancer5678)
Thanks for the advice. What is actually in a maths degree? I’ve been googling it but can’t seem to find much linked to what I’m looking for. What I mean is for your work, are you set questions to do, or is it reading or something else etc. What is the actual work like and what are the lectures like?
My first year was organised as such:
each term we had 5 modules we were working on. We completed 16 exam modules, and one coursework module over the year. The coursework module was two computational projects, and was part of a course teaching us to use MATLAB, a mathematical programming software. It was easy.

The 16 exam modules were examined over 5 exams. The first 2 were Pure, and the following 3 were applied.

Pure Maths, contrary to what you might have been shown at A level, is very much concerned with proofs in abstract settings. So for instance, Paper 2 was Analysis. Analysis as a course starts at the very basic ends of proof: from the Axioms for the reals, proving basic facts about the reals. Then moving onto function continuity, and rigorous definitions for that. It then moved into Differentiation and finally Integration, and rigorous definitions of what makes a function differentiable and integrable. If you want to get a taste for beginners analysis, pick up How to think about Analysis by Lara Alcock. This book really helped ease me into, and confirm that I had chosen the right course.

Paper 1 was about linear algebra and groups. Linear algebra is concerned with linear combinations of vectors in a vector space, and the properties thereof. Groups are sets of numbers with an associated operation where the operation is associative (a +(b+c) = (a+b)+c), the set is closed under the operation (combining two elements using the operation always creates something in the set) and the set has to have an identity element. The naturals (with 0) and addition are an excellent example of a group. I recommend you look up group theory, it's really great.

The applied papers covered topics from geometry, dynamics (think about mechanics, except everything is vectors all the time) and calculus, to Statistics, probability and Fourier series.

What is important to note about every aspect of my course is that the entire focus (pretty much) is on being able to prove what you say. It is all about rigorously stating and proving concepts. That's what maths is, and it's not the way it's taught until university.

The way my university organises the work for the Maths course is slightly different to others. We would have a work sheet per 2 lectures (1 per module per week usually) and then we would check through these with our tutors whenever we agreed to. Most universities have much less worksheets, however they are a lot longer. They also tend to teach through seminars of 5-10 people rather than tutorials of 2-3 people.

Lectures are pretty good. Here is a lecture by the Myth, The Legend, Vicky Neale. I was in this lecture, and it is typical of good lecturing. However, the subject matter is simply for those who mayn't have done complex numbers yet.

It's a really rewarding course. I would recommend it if the journey to an answer in maths is often of far more interest to you than the answer itself. In second year, I get to start picking what I study (no more Dynamics, Yay!)

Any more questions? Ask away!
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