I'm not sure I'm at the right university Watch

amyra1409
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(Sorry it’s long!)

So I’ve just finished my second week at university (Fresher’s Week and the first week of lectures) and I’m not sure how I feel.

My accommodation is really nice, my flatmates are lovely and I have no problem with the course I’m studying (I know it’s early but I’m studying French and Italian - both of which I did at A-Level so it’s just slightly more advanced than what I did at college) but I just don’t know what to think of the whole situation.

I did my A-Levels at sixth form college; I spent 3 years there (as I repeated a year) and it was a very large college - nearly 5000 students. The campus was quite large but was really nice - it was a 10 minute walk from the station and a 20 minute walk from the city centre. I travelled there each day by bus and then train (approximately 1-1.5 hours each way). As it was college I was free to come and go whenever I had a lesson/had a free - just like university. My college was in a small (but very nice) city and it’s often compared to the city where my university is.

The issue is that I now live on campus, in a campus university although it’s not quite as isolated as some campus universities. I’ve always lived in a semi-rural, small town (no shops!) and have always assumed that I’d find universities in the centre of large cities too much. But I now feel somewhat trapped and like I’ve regressed: I’ve gone from ‘commuting’ to college each day, to now living and studying in the same place. I do understand that all universities will feel like that to some extent in the first year.

I applied for 5 universities, got offers from all of them and in the end achieved A-Level grades which met the conditions of all the universities I had applied for. My subject is not the most common and therefore I didn’t actually have much choice when it came to applying; I also never had an absolute favourite. In the end it came down to a decision between 2 universities: the one that I’m now at, and the one which was my insurance.

I have to admit that I slightly preferred the modules of my insurance university (probably my favourite course of all the universities offer but I am excited to do the modules that I have chosen) but I chose the one I’m at because it was a campus university in a small city (oh the irony!), whilst the other is in the centre of a large city. There was also more flexibility in the course that I’m currently on as I have the choice to study 3 languages which was something that I was considering. My mother was also not keen on me going to my insurance and I think she influenced me a little although I try not to be influenced by things like that.

I’m not considering dropping out - not yet at least - but I am wondering whether that would be the best option for me. The other issue is that now I have thought about it, I keep thinking about it.

If I did decide to drop out, I’d stay at the university for a little longer just to check that I’m not making a mistake, and I have no issues with my course or anything, but then stop at/by Christmas. I’d spend a couple of months at home to maybe earn some money and then I would like to be an au pair - probably in Italy. I’d also want to learn the flute - random I know - but I have always studied music and come from a musical family. But suddenly, I’ve ended up at university not studying it (although I’d never have chosen it as a degree subject) and where there is no music department. Yes there are orchestras and choirs etc., but I’m first study pianist and therefore cannot join anything. I would use my gap year to develop skills so that if I started university again, I’d feel more in the position and confident to try things. Yes, I know I can try things now, nut my university feels quite ‘*****y’ when it comes to things like that.

I’m quite quiet and I’ve had quite a conservative and sheltered upbringing. Over the summer I started to realise that a gap year would probably be a good thing for me - otherwise I’d have gone from school to school, then college and then university. I’ve always lived in the same area and therefore believe that having an ‘adventure’ would be so good for me. I feel like I just need some life experience!

But one of the main reasons I’d never considered a gap year properly is because I’m already a year behind - plus my birthday is in September (the day I moved in to uni!) and therefore I’ll always be nearly an academic year older. For example if I started uni again next year I’d probably already be 21 (although I’d start the academic year age 20 so I wouldn’t be a mature student). However half of my current flat ‘gap yeared’, including one who did 2 because she did a gap year and then started university last year and dropped out, so that has put my mind at ease a little.

I’m just not sure what to do...
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MidgetFever
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As you've said it's probably best to leave it a while just to be sure; you might come to enjoy it after a while. If you're still set on dropping out then speak to a university adviser as there are likely to be financial implications of dropping out early. (I took a leave of absence around Christmas time and SFE claimed that I'd been overpaid on my loan so I had to give that back, meaning I was 3k down on my loan in the year I went back)
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HoldThisL
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this is exactly the kind consideration every fresher makes because university isn't like the first 18 years of your life and something got to feel weird

you should really stick it out because your life is full of changes like this; whether that's work, relationships or familar related, it'll happen again and you'll have to deal with it. if you drop out, that's another year of your life and several thousand pounds (potentially) gone
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amyra1409
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(Original post by HoldThisL)
this is exactly the kind consideration every fresher makes because university isn't like the first 18 years of your life and something got to feel weird

you should really stick it out because your life is full of changes like this; whether that's work, relationships or familar related, it'll happen again and you'll have to deal with it. if you drop out, that's another year of your life and several thousand pounds (potentially) gone
Ngl I don't think you've read what I said. I'm not struggling with the change, I just don't think I've had enough changes. I just feel a little trapped. Also a year of my life would not be gone, I'd spend it getting useful life experience.
Last edited by amyra1409; 3 months ago
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