ColinDent
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I'm curious as to how many people on here regularly encounter others with opposing views on Brexit and if this is the case then how do you get on these people.
I myself have a few family members and friends who are remainers, but when discussing the rights and wrongs of each others views we have never fallen out.
From what I can gather the vast majority of people just want to get it out of the way and are accepting of both what others feel and the result of the referendum.
Is mine an isolated experience or is it what is actually the state of play in the nation?
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cath_slater
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I have found very few people that agree with my views. No one in my family has a similar view and so we just avoid the topic now as to avoid an argument 😂. There’s so many possibilities as to what could happen and I think that’s why so many people disagree with each other. Plus the fact that not a lot of people are actually following the situation closely, they hear brexit or boris and just get angry cus it’s politics
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AngryRedhead
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I rarely encounter Brexit supporters in my everyday life (work, uni etc) maybe because I don’t like to talk about it and those who do support it tend to keep quiet about it
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anarchism101
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(Original post by ColinDent)
From what I can gather the vast majority of people just want to get it out of the way
In my experience this (and similar expressions) is a common attitude, but it disguises that Remainers and Leavers mean different things by it.

There is a strong desire on behalf of both to "move on", but Leavers mean "Let's just leave and move on" whereas Remainers mean "Let's just give up on Brexit and move on". Both hate the current impasse but somehow believe that the divisions will be miraculously healed if only their way prevails.

There are only three ways I see the impasse ending:
i) Either Johnson, Corbyn, or another Labour or Tory leader, bites the bullet and pushes an incredibly unpopular Withdrawal Agreement through parliament, because it's ultimately the responsible thing to do. This establishes a new status quo with the UK outside the EU, and puts the issue enough into the background for politics to move on.
ii) We crash out with no deal. Short-term economic chaos for several weeks is eventually resolved with a set of deals much more favourable to the EU, likely certain independence for Scotland and possible Irish unification, and Brexit as a political cause discredited and toxified as the UK drifts back into the EU over the 2020s.
iii) Pro-Remain parties are, by luck, somehow able to repeatedly grind out parliamentary majorities until a point comes where, due to older Leave supporters dying off and younger Remain supporters coming of age, Leavers no longer stand any hope of numerical victory.

iii) is probably the least likely, imo.
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Napp
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(Original post by ColinDent)
From what I can gather the vast majority of people just want to get it out of the way and are accepting of both what others feel and the result of the referendum.
Seriously?!
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ColinDent
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(Original post by Napp)
Seriously?!
Yes, even to the point of a conversation with 2 who I know voted remain in the referendum stating they would now vote to leave if another referendum were to happen because the issue will only get worse if we don't actually leave now.
I understand that this is only anecdotal evidence but I also know myself that the conversation actually took place.
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Wired_1800
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(Original post by ColinDent)
I'm curious as to how many people on here regularly encounter others with opposing views on Brexit and if this is the case then how do you get on these people.
I myself have a few family members and friends who are remainers, but when discussing the rights and wrongs of each others views we have never fallen out.
From what I can gather the vast majority of people just want to get it out of the way and are accepting of both what others feel and the result of the referendum.
Is mine an isolated experience or is it what is actually the state of play in the nation?
I think the media lie that people are fighting each other on Brexit is overblown. Yes, there are differences but we move on.

For me, I have family, friends and relatives who fundamentally disagree with my position. However, we have never fallen out. Maybe it is because we have these sort of heated discussions about politics, government, business and law, so we are used to disagreeing with each other.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by anarchism101)
In my experience this (and similar expressions) is a common attitude, but it disguises that Remainers and Leavers mean different things by it.

There is a strong desire on behalf of both to "move on", but Leavers mean "Let's just leave and move on" whereas Remainers mean "Let's just give up on Brexit and move on". Both hate the current impasse but somehow believe that the divisions will be miraculously healed if only their way prevails.

There are only three ways I see the impasse ending:
i) Either Johnson, Corbyn, or another Labour or Tory leader, bites the bullet and pushes an incredibly unpopular Withdrawal Agreement through parliament, because it's ultimately the responsible thing to do. This establishes a new status quo with the UK outside the EU, and puts the issue enough into the background for politics to move on.
ii) We crash out with no deal. Short-term economic chaos for several weeks is eventually resolved with a set of deals much more favourable to the EU, likely certain independence for Scotland and possible Irish unification, and Brexit as a political cause discredited and toxified as the UK drifts back into the EU over the 2020s.
iii) Pro-Remain parties are, by luck, somehow able to repeatedly grind out parliamentary majorities until a point comes where, due to older Leave supporters dying off and younger Remain supporters coming of age, Leavers no longer stand any hope of numerical victory.

iii) is probably the least likely, imo.
I disagree with what you feel the outcome of a no deal brexit would be, and your last scenario is I'm afraid, purely wishful thinking on your part as parliament repeatedly doing that would not only make the economy suffer much more than leaving the EU without a deal ( yes I understand that there will be a short term hit to the economy if we are to leave without a deal), but it would also require the general public to just keep accepting the fact that politicians don't want to listen to what we think, and I can tell you now that is not going to happen.
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Napp
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(Original post by ColinDent)
Yes, even to the point of a conversation with 2 who I know voted remain in the referendum stating they would now vote to leave if another referendum were to happen because the issue will only get worse if we don't actually leave now.
I understand that this is only anecdotal evidence but I also know myself that the conversation actually took place.
Oh im not doubting your conversation with them im just doubting the majority remark. although i am inclined to agree with them that the longer it goes on the worse itll become (there was a good article by the editor of the spectator on the matter last week). Theres now no way to go back to business as usual and i dont especially doubt we will leave but i maintain my stance on having a vote to establish reaffirmation on the matter as for all the people i know who voted brexit none did it wanting a hard brexit and thats what were staring down the barrel of thanks to the government.
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JanusGodofDoors
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Most of the people I know are on the same page (remainers) but I do know a few Brexiteers, all of whom are very decent people who are open to having an intelligent discussion about what we do and don’t agree on. My opinion of them hasn’t changed because of their views on this matter, they’re still good people even if we don’t agree on this particular point.
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ColinDent
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(Original post by JanusGodofDoors)
Most of the people I know are on the same page (remainers) but I do know a few Brexiteers, all of whom are very decent people who are open to having an intelligent discussion about what we do and don’t agree on. My opinion of them hasn’t changed because of their views on this matter, they’re still good people even if we don’t agree on this particular point.
Exactly, I totally agree.
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QE2
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(Original post by anarchism101)
iii) until a point comes where, due to older Leave supporters dying off and younger Remain supporters coming of age, Leavers no longer stand any hope of numerical victory.
According to a study by a professor of demographics, that point was passed early this year.
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QE2
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(Original post by ColinDent)
Yes, even to the point of a conversation with 2 who I know voted remain in the referendum stating they would now vote to leave if another referendum were to happen because the issue will only get worse if we don't actually leave now.
I understand that this is only anecdotal evidence but I also know myself that the conversation actually took place.
Similarly, I know several people who voted Leave but now support Remain - due mainly to realising that they based their vote on misinformation and lies. There are other who more recently have switched because they feel they cannot trust the current regime to do what is best for the country rather than for their rich and privileged backers.
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QE2
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(Original post by ColinDent)
it would also require the general public to just keep accepting the fact that politicians don't want to listen to what we think,
If parliament voted to revoke A50, they would be doing exactly what myself and many millions of others (otherwise known as "the people" ) want.

This is the fundamental problem with Leavers. They assume to speak for the entire country. Newsflash - they do not. At least half of the adult population wants to Remain, and politicians working to achieve Remain are listening to what that half of the people thinks.
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QE2
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(Original post by JanusGodofDoors)
Most of the people I know are on the same page (remainers) but I do know a few Brexiteers, all of whom are very decent people who are open to having an intelligent discussion about what we do and don’t agree on. My opinion of them hasn’t changed because of their views on this matter, they’re still good people even if we don’t agree on this particular point.
I know two Leavers (through a mutual acquaintance) who are appalling racists who regularly share stuff from far right groups on social media. They are unapologetic about their position on Brexit, which is simple xenophobia.
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StormXibalba
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London truly is a remain bubble. I'm one of the few Brexiteers I know and I lie about it because I know some of my friends would stop talking to me if I told them.

I was shocked the other day when one of my friends said he thought the referendum was a lie because he has NEVER met a brexiteer in his entire life. That's how much of a bubble it is here.
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StormXibalba
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(Original post by QE2)
If parliament voted to revoke A50, they would be doing exactly what myself and many millions of others (otherwise known as "the people" ) want.

This is the fundamental problem with Leavers. They assume to speak for the entire country. Newsflash - they do not. At least half of the adult population wants to Remain, and politicians working to achieve Remain are listening to what that half of the people thinks.
At the last poll we had (which is all we have) less than half of the population wanted to remain.

The only way to know if that has changed is to have another poll and we haven't implemented the first yet.
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The Mogg
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As a conservative and brexiteer, it really isn't that hard for me to find opposition to all my views in the real world
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JanusGodofDoors
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(Original post by QE2)
I know two Leavers (through a mutual acquaintance) who are appalling racists who regularly share stuff from far right groups on social media. They are unapologetic about their position on Brexit, which is simple xenophobia.
That’s really difficult. There a lots of people on both sides of this debate who make sound and rational cases for their particular stance, but there are also those using Brexit as a means of airing abhorrent views and obscene language (mostly though not exclusively brexiteers, some remainers do also fall into this camp).
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Obolinda
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I rarely talk about Brexit in real life. Of the ppl I have, they're remainers. Most of my friends couldn't care less either way
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