Chem help- amphoteric metals and NaOH

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username2391805
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#1
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I don’t understand. It said that hydroxide ions, when reacted with amphoteric metals will always form a white precipitate. But in this one reaction between lead oxide and NaOh, the product formed is aqueous. Everything contradicts each other
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wazzupitsme
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(Original post by Anna191817)
I don’t understand. It said that hydroxide ions, when reacted with amphoteric metals will always form a white precipitate. But in this one reaction between lead oxide and NaOh, the product formed is aqueous. Everything contradicts each other
While hydroxide ions and amphoteric metals react to produce a white precipitate, lead oxide is not generically considered as a amphoteric metal but rather as an amphoteric oxide/metal oxide. And yes, they are different hence causing the reaction between lead oxide and NaOH to give this;

PbO + 2NaOH → Na2PbO2 + H2O
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(Original post by wazzupitsme)
While hydroxide ions and amphoteric metals react to produce a white precipitate, lead oxide is not generically considered as a amphoteric metal but rather as an amphoteric oxide/metal oxide. And yes, they are different hence causing the reaction between lead oxide and NaOH to give this;

PbO + 2NaOH → Na2PbO2 + H2O
The reaction in my textbook was:
PbO + 2NaOH + H2O —> Na2[Pb(OH)4] (aq)
My teacher said that a white precipitate is produced
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wazzupitsme
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(Original post by Anna191817)
The reaction in my textbook was:
PbO + 2NaOH + H2O —> Na2[Pb(OH)4] (aq)
My teacher said that a white precipitate is produced
Did she say that for the equation mentioned above? As far as I know, PbO when reacting with H2O forms a precipitate and it then reacts with NaOH to produce an aqueous. Now that you've asked I am mildly confused as well :confused:
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username2391805
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#5
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I just figured it out. Like you said before, it is the metal ions themselves that form a white precipitate with OH- when dissolved IN SOLUTION. However, when it’s in oxide or hydroxide form, these ions will react to form a salt (which is usually soluble). You were right. I think my teacher got it wrong or I’ve misinterpreted wazzupitsme
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wazzupitsme
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#6
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Anna191817 Glad I could be of help! It is a bit of a muddle up in all honesty.
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