gmmamin
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Hi, I have a few questions related to clearing and wondering if someone can help out please.
1. Can we change the course from medical to engineering or vice versa after getting the results?
2. Do we need to create another personal statement for the course as obviously it was created for something else before?
3. Since we would have got actual results, do we still need to worry about GCSE grades?
4. If the results are really good, is there chance to get into a good uni or do we have to wait for a year?

Many thanks for your help.
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gmmamin
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Hi, my son hasn't got good GCSE grades and English was at 5/C, others Maths and sciences at 7 and 6. Although he has pulled himself together for this year (A levels), his teacher told him that the predicted grades will not be A's as the school has stopped giving the grades the students request for from this year on (due to bad results in school last year). She asked him to apply for a foundation year medicine course. My questions are:
1. Are foundation courses restricted by certain parameters/location or anyone can apply?
2. If we get selected for a uni and the results are good, can we request the uni for normal course without foundation year?
3. If we wanted to change uni, can we do so using clearing process?

Many thanks for your help.
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ecolier
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(Original post by gmmamin)
...1. Are foundation courses restricted by certain parameters/location or anyone can apply?
Foundation courses are restricted and not every one can apply. You'll need to get the criteria from individual med schools.

2. If we get selected for a uni and the results are good, can we request the uni for normal course without foundation year?
You'll have to email individual Unis whether you can "request" them to let you join the normal course. It's unlikely.

3. If we wanted to change uni, can we do so using clearing process?
You will have to have no offers to join the Clearing process, and it is by no means certain you'll get a place through Clearing (for Medicine).

(Original post by gmmamin)
Hi, I have a few questions related to clearing and wondering if someone can help out please.
You need to have a more realistic view on Medicine Clearing. The places are increasing but it's still really rare.

1. Can we change the course from medical to engineering or vice versa after getting the results?
Unlikely Engineering to Medicine, the other way? Possible but non-competitive Unis.

2. Do we need to create another personal statement for the course as obviously it was created for something else before?
Depends on Uni. For Medicine probably.

3. Since we would have got actual results, do we still need to worry about GCSE grades?
Yes you'd still need to meet the basic entry requirements.

4. If the results are really good, is there chance to get into a good uni or do we have to wait for a year?
There are no "good" or "bad" Unis for Medicine. A medical student is a medical student is a medical student, and a medical degree is equal whether it's an Oxford or Anglia Ruskin one. Be grateful that you got a chance through Clearing if you manage to get that far. Most people can't even ring through to admissions on Results Day.
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gmmamin
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Thanks for reverting quickly and answering both my posts.
If foundation is restricted, wondering why the teacher asked to apply using that route.

I can understand why all uni's are claimed to be similar/same. I am sure people may agree and disagree on this one. If all were same, there wouldn't be so many different criteria for selection for each, some asking very high grades. Obviously there is a difference however the degree completed at the end of the course is the same.

On the GCSE grades, I was told they may not be weighing in a lot if the actual A results are good. Does this vary from uni to uni?

Again many thanks for all your inputs.
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ecolier
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(Original post by gmmamin)
Thanks for reverting quickly and answering both my posts.
If foundation is restricted, wondering why the teacher asked to apply using that route.
Well it's up to the candidates to research their pathways, sometimes the teachers / careers advisors at school can be wrong too.

I can understand why all uni's are claimed to be similar/same. I am sure people may agree and disagree on this one. If all were same, there wouldn't be so many different criteria for selection for each, some asking very high grades. Obviously there is a difference however the degree completed at the end of the course is the same.
There's nothing to agree or disagree on. Basically all medical degrees are the same, no matter where you graduated from. It is only 5 years of your study.

Read https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/uni...etition-ratios, it may be outdated (2012-2015 stats) but you can see that Brighton Sussex has been more competitive than Cambridge - which is one of least competitive medical schools.

Cambridge also has no GCSE requirements also, their standard offer is A*A*A at A-Levels though.

Keele's (a non-Russell Group uni - not that RG means anything for medicine) standard off is A*AA, which is higher than most RG medical schools' standard offers of AAA.

Basically all medical schools have different requirements to cater for different applicants - it's not really because of their courses' "calibre" or their "prestige" . Both means nothing for Medicine.

So choose according to the location of the Uni (e.g. London vs non-London, rural vs Uni cities), the teaching style (PBL vs integrated vs traditional), linked hospitals, your personal preference and not the perceived ranking of the Unis.

On the GCSE grades, I was told they may not be weighing in a lot if the actual A results are good. Does this vary from uni to uni?
No, because there will be people with both good A Level results and meeting their standard GCSE requirements. Remember that Clearing is going to extremely competitive and there will be plenty of A*A*A* students (who didn't get an offer) chasing places. On the other hand you have students like @lollypenguin who got into med school (5 year course) with ABB achieved.
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gmmamin
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(Original post by ecolier)
Well it's up to the candidates to research their pathways, sometimes the teachers / careers advisors at school can be wrong too.



There's nothing to agree or disagree on. Basically all medical degrees are the same, no matter where you graduated from. It is only 5 years of your study.

Read https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/uni...etition-ratios, it may be outdated (2012-2015 stats) but you can see that Brighton Sussex has been more competitive than Cambridge - which is one of least competitive medical schools.

Cambridge also has no GCSE requirements also, their standard offer is A*A*A at A-Levels though.

Keele's (a non-Russell Group uni - not that RG means anything for medicine) standard off is A*AA, which is higher than most RG medical schools' standard offers of AAA.

Basically all medical schools have different requirements to cater for different applicants - it's not really because of their courses' "calibre" or their "prestige" . Both means nothing for Medicine.

So choose according to the location of the Uni (e.g. London vs non-London, rural vs Uni cities), the teaching style (PBL vs integrated vs traditional), linked hospitals, your personal preference and not the perceived ranking of the Unis.



No, because there will be people with both good A Level results and meeting their standard GCSE requirements. Remember that Clearing is going to extremely competitive and there will be plenty of A*A*A* students (who didn't get an offer) chasing places. On the other hand you have students like @lollypenguin who got into med school (5 year course) with ABB achieved.
Thanks for your help.
My son got 640 UCAT at band 2 today. I think the chances are even more slimmer now. :-(.
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ecolier
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(Original post by gmmamin)
Thanks for your help.
My son got 640 UCAT at band 2 today. I think the chances are even more slimmer now. :-(.
Sorry to hear that.
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