University of Manchester not diverse or sociable? Watch

Sararee
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I have heard personal stories from numerous UoM students, especially ethnic minorities, of how the atmosphere there is pretty bleak and the general student population is rather unsociable when compared to neighbouring uni, the Manchester Metropolitan Uni. It's not unheard of for UoM students to go to MMU to hang out, have fun, make new friends, ect. It actually seems to be a common trend, especially among British-born ethnic minority students - note, I'm differentiating them from the international students in this case. Furthermore, the university is dominated by middle-class people and the working-class often feel ostracised. I consistently hear these complaints from UoM students. Is the social atmosphere really that closed-off and unwelcoming over there? What's actually going on?
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username4499734
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I go MMU and the only reason that’s it’s more social is because they literally accept anyone and most people are there solely for partying and the experience lmao. Even I can safely say UoM >>>> MMU
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Sararee
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(Original post by OR321)
I go MMU and the only reason that’s it’s more social is because they literally accept anyone and most people are there solely for partying and the experience lmao. Even I can safely say UoM >>>> MMU
You are playing into stereotypes. Tonnes of serious, hard-working students attend MMU. Yes, you're going to see a lively party scene, but that can be applied to literally every uni in the UK, and in the world for that matter. I don't know why you think UoM has students of a higher calibre? I know students who go there and trust me, plenty of MMU students could easily academically outperform them. Whether they like it or not, most UoM students end up in the same post-graduate positions as MMU students - at least that's the case for my undergraduate degree, Law. UoM law grads literally work side by side MMU law grads, same firms for legal training contracts, ect.
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username4499734
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(Original post by Sararee)
You are playing into stereotypes. Tonnes of serious, hard-working students attend MMU. Yes, you're going to see a lively party scene, but that can be applied to literally every uni in the UK, and in the world for that matter. I don't know why you think UoM has students of a higher calibre? I know students who go there and trust me, plenty of MMU students could easily academically outperform them. Whether they like it or not, most UoM students end up in the same post-graduate positions as MMU students - at least that's the case for my undergraduate degree, Law. UoM law grads literally work side by side MMU law grads, same firms for legal training contracts, ect.
Yeah but it’s a lot harder to get into UoM and I wasn’t generalising the students at MMU. I don’t know anyone who would pick MMU over UoM though if they had the choice.
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Sararee
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(Original post by OR321)
Yeah but it’s a lot harder to get into UoM and I wasn’t generalising the students at MMU. I don’t know anyone who would pick MMU over UoM though if they had the choice.
You were generalising the students; read your own post. It was a negative generalisation on your part. I know numerous MMU students who got grades along the lines of AAA or AAB at A-Level, but weren't accepted to UoM whereas students who achieved lower grades were taken on for the same undergraduate degrees. I also know students who simply didn't want to attend UoM because they visited on the open days and felt like the university wasn't the right fit for them. Most MMU students who have actually had first had experience with UoM students don't view UoM as prestige because they quickly realise the students aren't as academically-inclined as they would have you believe on thestudentroom.
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username4499734
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(Original post by Sararee)
You were generalising the students; read your own post. It was a negative generalisation on your part. I know numerous MMU students who got grades along the lines of AAA or AAB at A-Level, but weren't accepted to UoM whereas students who achieved lower grades were taken on for the same undergraduate degrees. I also know students who simply didn't want to attend UoM because they visited on the open days and felt like the university wasn't the right fit for them.
Ok..... why you crying for?? Visit the unis yourself and decide which one you wanna go to rather than complaining about the social life. Both are in the same city and very close to each other so loads of event will be similar/together
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Sararee
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(Original post by OR321)
Ok..... why you crying for?? Visit the unis yourself and decide which one you wanna go to rather than complaining about the social life
Socialising is a key component to thriving in university, that's why. Why would anyone want to spend 3+ years at an institution that leaves them feeling depressed and undesired? If anything, you are less likely to excel in your studies and will probably feel the after-effect of the toll it took on your mental health for years post-uni.
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milkshakelover
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(Original post by Sararee)
You are playing into stereotypes. Tonnes of serious, hard-working students attend MMU. Yes, you're going to see a lively party scene, but that can be applied to literally every uni in the UK, and in the world for that matter. I don't know why you think UoM has students of a higher calibre? I know students who go there and trust me, plenty of MMU students could easily academically outperform them. Whether they like it or not, most UoM students end up in the same post-graduate positions as MMU students - at least that's the case for my undergraduate degree, Law. UoM law grads literally work side by side MMU law grads, same firms for legal training contracts, ect.
LMAOOOOOOOOOOO
"UoM has students of a higher calibre" they do, their degrees are of significantly more academic value than any degree at MMU
"same firms for legal training contracts?" mate where???? bc it sure as hell isnt the magic circle
"at least that's the case for my undergraduate degree, Law" if you're referencing the LPC/BPTC, thats a naff argument; you have no choice but to do it at ULaw or BPP so try again love x
"UoM law grads literally work side by side MMU law grads" evidence? look at the employability statistics on their own and you'll be proven wrong
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Sararee
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(Original post by milkshakelover)
LMAOOOOOOOOOOO
"UoM has students of a higher calibre" they do, their degrees are of significantly more academic value than any degree at MMU
"same firms for legal training contracts?" mate where???? bc it sure as hell isnt the magic circle
"at least that's the case for my undergraduate degree, Law" if you're referencing the LPC/BPTC, thats a naff argument; you have no choice but to do it at ULaw or BPP so try again love x
"UoM law grads literally work side by side MMU law grads" evidence? look at the employability statistics on their own and you'll be proven wrong
Why so sensitive and angry? The vast majority of UoM and MMU grads work side by side in most fields, that includes law. I have friends at UoM and have spoken to numerous practising lawyers who attended both UoM and MMU Law Schools. They all say the same thing: law firms don't care about the origin of your LLB as long as you graduated with a first or 2:1. They're more interested in other applicable skills like communication, confident public speaking, experience, ect. Magic circle law firms? The vast majority of lawyers will not work for those top tier firms, and if anything they're more like to recruit Oxbridge, London School of Economic, UCL graduates, not UoM grads (exceptions always exist). You're over-emotional and too focused on the social standing of your university; consequently, you cannot see the reality for what it is. Your problem, not mine.
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stickylikehoney
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I'm British Indian and I went to Manchester and I felt racism and segregation when I was UoM.
I had to put up with racist comments and xenophobia from people who had barely interacted with PoC before going to the uni.
I also noticed there wasn't much racial mixing.
On the most part, it was just full of posh rich kids who mainly wanted to go to Manchester because of the thriving social life. People weren't particularly friendly or nice.
Also, the Uni is very big and faceless and it could get so lonely sometimes.
On the otherhand, it is a very good uni and it was always good to know I was at a top uni getting a good degree.

I don't think it was in my head. I did my MA at Kent Uni and had no problems and didn't feel any of this once.
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Idk why you started a thread about UoM just to astroturf for MMU. There are party universities all over the world and MMU is no exception, sure the grades required to get in are lower, and this obviously attracts students who are less academically confident. So it's kind of a no-brainer that you'll get more students coming out of MMU with a harder time in the job market developing their careers. Sure, you'll have people that do well from MMU, but trying to categorise UoM with MMU is just nonsense.

To answer your actual question, Manchester as a whole is a grim, gloomy place. There's diversity and sociability, just not the sort you're looking for.
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Sararee
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(Original post by stickylikehoney)
I'm British Indian and I went to Manchester and I felt racism and segregation when I was UoM.
I had to put up with racist comments and xenophobia from people who had barely interacted with PoC before going to the uni.
I also noticed there wasn't much racial mixing.
On the most part, it was just full of posh rich kids who mainly wanted to go to Manchester because of the thriving social life. People weren't particularly friendly or nice.
Also, the Uni is very big and faceless and it could get so lonely sometimes.
On the otherhand, it is a very good uni and it was always good to know I was at a top uni getting a good degree.

I don't think it was in my head. I did my MA at Kent Uni and had no problems and didn't feel any of this once.
All the British Asians I speak to say exactly what you're saying about UoM! I thought it was a diverse and friendly university for minority ethnics, glad I turned out to know the truth. Feel like I really dodged a bullet. I wouldn't attend a uni based solely on ranking because most employers don't even care about uni rankings. I would avoid a racist university like the plague though.
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stickylikehoney
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If you can go to an equally good southern uni like Kings I would say go there instead.
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milkshakelover
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(Original post by Sararee)
Why so sensitive and angry? The vast majority of UoM and MMU grads work side by side in most fields, that includes law. I have friends at UoM and have spoken to numerous practising lawyers who attended both UoM and MMU Law Schools. They all say the same thing: law firms don't care about the origin of your LLB as long as you graduated with a first or 2:1. They're more interested in other applicable skills like communication, confident public speaking, experience, ect. Magic circle law firms? The vast majority of lawyers will not work for those top tier firms, and if anything they're more like to recruit Oxbridge, London School of Economic, UCL graduates, not UoM grads (exceptions always exist). You're over-emotional and too focused on the social standing of your university; consequently, you cannot see the reality for what it is. Your problem, not mine.
lmao ok but if you cant mingle with students not in your own ethnic group, which seems to be the point in your OG post, thats a personal problem. The uni is exceptionally diverse.
any high performing RG uni is going to be dominated by the middle class; thats factual but it doesnt follow that this aspect is why the social life at the uni isn't welcoming.
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singzeon
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I feel like you started this thread to merely get confirmation of what you heard.
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