Should referendum results be honoured? Watch

0le
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#61
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#61
As far as I understand it, a referendum is not binding. However, it is surely political suicide to not accept its result.
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Vinny C
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#62
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#62
(Original post by Burton Bridge)
Struggling to find any realistic points to reply too in that word salad post. You are again spilting my words down again to make false points and defeat points I'm not even making, very boring and pointless.

Parliament is sovereign seems to be a buzz phrase with remainers at present, has one of you're poltical idols said it recently? Parliament should be sovereign but it currently is bound in some cases by the superiority of EU law, so it's not as sovereign as it should be.

The referendum result was not legally binding; however, it was widely accepted that the vote would be politically binding on future Westminster Parliaments.Meet reality

https://youtu.be/gUsKWsPcRXE
Vote Leave: Tick here for pastures of sunny delight. Remain: Tick there for chaos, crisis and constitutional meltdown. Now, let's see... who was the closest?
Last edited by Vinny C; 2 weeks ago
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gjd800
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#63
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#63
(Original post by ColinDent)
No the correct spelling in English (UK) is spelt, in the US it's spelled.
https://www.grammar-monster.com/easi...lled_spelt.htm

It has become more used over here because of the Americanisation of our culture, much like the term can I get when, for example, ordering a drink which is also incorrect as the answer should be no you can't get it but I will for you.
Weird prescriptivism here

I like 'spelt' but the OED allows both spelled and spelt as standard past participle/past tense. 'Spelled' has heritage in England as far back as the 1600s, and Shakespeare also 'spelled' it as a variation of this in Love's Labour's Lost circa 1598

Spelt came in in the mid 18th Century, and so it's not as easy as all that
Last edited by gjd800; 2 weeks ago
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Vinny C
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#64
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#64
(Original post by 0le)
As far as I understand it, a referendum is not binding. However, it is surely political suicide to not accept its result.
I must admit... I was almost taken in by the promises of sunny delight myself but then saw who was making them.
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0le
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#65
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#65
(Original post by Vinny C)
I must admit... I was almost taken in by the promises of sunny delight myself but then saw who was making them.
I genuinely don't have a clue what you are talking about.
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Vinny C
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#66
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#66
(Original post by 0le)
I genuinely don't have a clue what you are talking about.
It is the curse of man he so readily forgets, see 4 posts up.
Last edited by Vinny C; 2 weeks ago
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Burton Bridge
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#67
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#67
(Original post by Vinny C)
I agree... the ERG need reminding who started this awful mess in the first place. Instead we let 30 or so right wing extremists call the shots in an assembly of over 600. Democracy is already down!
(Original post by Vinny C)
Hey... they usually both gang up on me! I'm feeling jealous.
(Original post by Vinny C)
Vote Leave: Tick here for pastures of sunny delight. Remain: Tick there for chaos, crisis and constitutional meltdown. Now, let's see... who was the closest?
Right.....ok.....
Last edited by Burton Bridge; 2 weeks ago
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Burton Bridge
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#68
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#68
(Original post by 0le)
I genuinely don't have a clue what you are talking about.
Nor did he I don't think.lol
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ColinDent
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#69
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#69
(Original post by Vinny C)
Hey... they usually both gang up on me! I'm feeling jealous.
Ganging up 🤣🤣🤣
you do love to play the martyr Vincenzo.
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ColinDent
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#70
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(Original post by gjd800)
Weird prescriptivism here

I like 'spelt' but the OED allows both spelled and spelt as standard past participle/past tense. 'Spelled' has heritage in England as far back as the 1600s, and Shakespeare also 'spelled' it as a variation of this in Love's Labour's Lost circa 1598

Spelt came in in the mid 18th Century, and so it's not as easy as all that
And when we're talking about common usage? It has recently been used again because of the Americanisation of our language and for no other reason than that.
But really my point was about another posters pedantry that has appeared on more than one reply in this thread alone, it's not something that I would normally do myself.
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HiViz9
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#71
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#71
(Original post by Vinny C)
Try showing a football supporter his appalling team stats after an unexpected win... I don't think his response would be terribly sympathetic. 25% of the electorate are still in terrace mentality and it is being fuelled by those who should know better. Cheap insults such as losers, remoaners and surrender bill belong in a terrace chant, not in Parliament.
LOL. OK. Thats my view on it and I am very happy with it. I am aslo very happy LEAVE EU won the referendum.
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Vinny C
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#72
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(Original post by HiViz9)
LOL. OK. Thats my view on it and I am very happy with it. I am aslo very happy LEAVE EU won the referendum.
Burton Albion were very happy when they beat Man Utd once by sheer fluke! Doesn't mean to say we field them to represent England come the World Cup!
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gjd800
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#73
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(Original post by ColinDent)
And when we're talking about common usage? It has recently been used again because of the Americanisation of our language and for no other reason than that.
But really my point was about another posters pedantry that has appeared on more than one reply in this thread alone, it's not something that I would normally do myself.
It has been pretty common here since the late 1800s

Just a bit of a weird flex mate, that's all! I do enjoy 'spelt' though, and it's what I'd pip for myself. Just a matter of choice as 'spelled' is also Standard English
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Vinny C
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#74
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#74
(Original post by ColinDent)
Ganging up 🤣🤣🤣
you do love to play the martyr Vincenzo.
Naww… just thought you guys had got fed up losing every argument.
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QE2
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
Now the name call, put downs and insults start, very predictable all we need now are the claims of self brilliance and superior intelligence.

Just watch the video and reply, the fact you cannot reply to points without wildly distorting the text of you're opponent, lying picking up spelling errors or engaging in namecall and belittlement shows how utterly deluded you are.

Combine a lack of self-awareness with low cognitive ability and you overestimate your own intelligence and competence. You say it's the people who generally idoits I say self evaluation may be key to improving you're future life.
So, the fact that you cannot point to any parts of the video where Cameron states that the referendum result will be "politically binding on future Westminster parliaments" shows that he never says that and you were doing either dishonest or "confused" in claiming that he did.
QED
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Burton Bridge
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(Original post by QE2)
So, the fact that you cannot point to any parts of the video where Cameron states that the referendum result will be "politically binding on future Westminster parliaments" shows that he never says that and you were doing either dishonest or "confused" in claiming that he did.
QED
Have you not got ears?

I also think you are again "misunderstanding" context in the way you are again arguing against a purposely weak point that you have artificially created by removing said context. What I actually said

However the referendum result was not legally binding; however, it was widely accepted that the vote would be politically binding on future Westminster Parliaments.

The video proved this, also the fact that all major parties (bar the illiberal undemocratic party) adapted it as official party policy, further proves this.

Are you less confused now?
Last edited by Burton Bridge; 2 weeks ago
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QE2
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#77
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(Original post by ColinDent)
No the correct spelling in English (UK) is spelt, in the US it's spelled.
https://www.grammar-monster.com/easi...lled_spelt.htm

It has become more used over here because of the Americanisation of our culture, much like the term can I get when, for example, ordering a drink which is also incorrect as the answer should be no you can't get it but I will for you.
From your "evidence" link...
"Outside America, spelt is more common, but spelled is generally accepted".
Take a look at this page from the Oxford Dictionaries website, and see how it spells "spelled". https://www.lexico.com/en/grammar/british-and-spelling
You were wrong to claim that "spelled" is not an acceptable spelling in British English. Just suck it up.
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QE2
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#78
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(Original post by Burton Bridge)
You are missing the point. Sometimes acting a self absorbed know all comes back to bite a person in the bum.

I dont believe ColinDent actually gives a flying flamingo how words are spelt, however when someone is acting so condescending, pedantic and insulting, a taste of own medication is warranted.
Unfortunately, as "spelled" is perfectly acceptable in British English, as confirmed by the Oxford Dictionaries website, both you and your girlfriend are wrong. The irony of the two of you making such a fuss about it is excruciating!
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Burton Bridge
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#79
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#79
(Original post by QE2)
Unfortunately, as "spelled" is perfectly acceptable in British English, as confirmed by the Oxford Dictionaries website, both you and your girlfriend are wrong. The irony of the two of you making such a fuss about it is excruciating!
You are confused again, Colin is an English-language masculine given name. ... An anglicized form of the Gaelic name Cuilen, Cailean, modern Irish spelling Coileáin, meaning "whelp, cub". The Old Irish word for "whelp," is cuilén. The Scottish Gaelic name is recorded in the spelling Colin from as early as the 14th century.

Meaning: (1) short for Nicolas; (2) Gaelic cuilen "whelp"

Gender: masculine
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HiViz9
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#80
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#80
(Original post by Vinny C)
Burton Albion were very happy when they beat Man Utd once by sheer fluke! Doesn't mean to say we field them to represent England come the World Cup!
Err...... OK. Bizarre strawman at that.
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