Year11Student:)
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I’ve always wondered if teachers are paid on like 9am- 3pm (or whatever the school hours are) or if they get paid from like the time they start in the morning until when they leave (5 or 6pm) and also do they get paid in the summer holidays because 6 weeks without pay doesn’t seem right?
Last edited by Year11Student:); 1 month ago
0
reply
Sir Cumference
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Year11Student:))
I’ve always wondered if teachers are paid on like 9am- 3pm (or whatever the school hours are) or if they get paid from like the time they start in the morning until when they leave (5 or 6pm) and also do they get paid in the summer holidays because 6 weeks without pay doesn’t seem right?
Speaking generally, a teacher has an annual salary based on 195 work days. This annual salary is divided into 12 and then they will receive a take home salary per month after deductions like tax. Teachers still get paid in months that they don't work.
1
reply
OR321
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
My A Level Business teacher told me she had a fixed 4 day a week teaching with a fixed salary of around £45k. But they do a lot of extra work themselves in their own time without any more pay. My teacher even came in on her days off, closer to exams, to teach us even though she didn’t get paid for it.
0
reply
Sir Cumference
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by OR321)
My A Level Business teacher told me she had a fixed 4 day a week teaching with a fixed salary of around £45k. But they do a lot of extra work themselves in their own time without any more pay. My teacher even came in on her days off, closer to exams, to teach us even though she didn’t get paid for it.
Private school?
0
reply
Euphoria101
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by OR321)
My A Level Business teacher told me she had a fixed 4 day a week teaching with a fixed salary of around £45k. But they do a lot of extra work themselves in their own time without any more pay. My teacher even came in on her days off, closer to exams, to teach us even though she didn’t get paid for it.
dang 45k?
0
reply
OR321
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by Sir Cumference)
Private school?
No. It was a public sixth form.
0
reply
OR321
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by dyingstudent101)
dang 45k?
Yeah. She worked for around 6 years there and got promoted quick coz she really was incredibly smart tbh
0
reply
Year11Student:)
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
Do you know what hours teachers work in terms of school hours because majority of my teachers stay late so is that becuase they are being paid for after school hours or just staying to do extra work?
0
reply
Euphoria101
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Year11Student:))
Do you know what hours teachers work in terms of school hours because majority of my teachers stay late so is that becuase they are being paid for after school hours or just staying to do extra work?
Staying behind is part of being a teacher
0
reply
Sir Cumference
  • Study Helper
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by OR321)
No. It was a public sixth form.
I thought I'd take a guess and I was wrong Of course teachers can earn that but it's above average.
1
reply
OR321
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by Year11Student:))
Do you know what hours teachers work in terms of school hours because majority of my teachers stay late so is that becuase they are being paid for after school hours or just staying to do extra work?
I Don’t think teachers get paid extra for staying behind. Again, they have fixed salaries so any extra hours on their own behalf isn’t paid usually
0
reply
OR321
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by Sir Cumference)
I thought I'd take a guess and I was wrong Of course teachers can earn that but it's above average.
Yeahh. She was pretty impressive though, like she was a very successful estate agent and investor too and she’d always indirectly brag about all the expensive things she buys 😂
0
reply
Greywolftwo
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by Year11Student:))
I’ve always wondered if teachers are paid on like 9am- 3pm (or whatever the school hours are) or if they get paid from like the time they start in the morning until when they leave (5 or 6pm) and also do they get paid in the summer holidays because 6 weeks without pay doesn’t seem right?
Teachers are teaching not for salary but for the value they get out of teaching, I want to be a detective when I’m older not for the pay but for the excitement of the job and the value it has
0
reply
TQRL
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
Not completely certain but according to rumors, teachers in my school aren't paid for before/after-class activities, "duty" or marking books. They're only paid for the lessons they have.
0
reply
traceonr
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by Year11Student:))
I’ve always wondered if teachers are paid on like 9am- 3pm (or whatever the school hours are) or if they get paid from like the time they start in the morning until when they leave (5 or 6pm) and also do they get paid in the summer holidays because 6 weeks without pay doesn’t seem right?
They're given a yearly salary, then will have to teach lessons they've been timetabled to teach, that'll be the only times they are expected to be at a place, at a particular time.
Which sounds great but teachers spend so much time doing lesson plans, marking exams, attending training/meetings, setting up revision sessions ect.

A colleague of mine sometimes did 70hr weeks as a head of faculty.
Some teachers might not care and try to get by doing very little, but they wouldn't be sucessful and would probably be sacked in no time
Last edited by traceonr; 1 month ago
0
reply
airfixfighter
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
I've just started teaching. I'm earning 23720 a year and I get paid every month. In terms of my day, I get to school about 7:30, usually leave about 4:30 but then I do work in the evenings and on Sundays. So maybe 55 hours a week?

In terms of teaching, I teach 24 hours a week. Everything else is planning and marking and training and meetings.
Last edited by airfixfighter; 1 month ago
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
(Original post by Year11Student:))
I’ve always wondered if teachers are paid on like 9am- 3pm (or whatever the school hours are) or if they get paid from like the time they start in the morning until when they leave (5 or 6pm) and also do they get paid in the summer holidays because 6 weeks without pay doesn’t seem right?
Teachers, like many professionals, aren't paid by the hour. They're paid a salary over the course of the year and expected to work certain core hours and attend certain school events (e.g. Parents evening, CPD, open evening and so on). Outside of this, they're expected to do work that needs to be done (planning, marking, writing reports etc), but this can usually be done at home or at school depending on teacher preference.

Teacher salaries are calculated to take into account the long holidays, but are paid every month- so if we lost the six week summer holidays, we'd expect salaries to go up, but we still get a pay packet in August.

Teacher in state schools are paid according to a national salary scale which you can find online. People who take on extra responsibilities within a school will get a "TLR" payment on top of their salary.
0
reply
mcd_connor
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by Year11Student:))
I’ve always wondered if teachers are paid on like 9am- 3pm (or whatever the school hours are) or if they get paid from like the time they start in the morning until when they leave (5 or 6pm) and also do they get paid in the summer holidays because 6 weeks without pay doesn’t seem right?
Hi,

Generally speaking, teachers are paid a salary which depends on a few things - the location of the school (e.g. London teachers get paid a substantial amount more than teachers in other areas of the country), experience, Teaching & Learning Responsibilities/TLR (e.g. Head of Department, Head of Year positions, etc), subject and potentially a few other things. See this link: https://getintoteaching.education.go...y-scale-salary

Teachers are paid once a month, with their salary divided into 12 equal chunks paid as you'd typically expect to be paid in any other job. Dependent on the school, they may add to your salary if you volunteer to do things such as break duty, canteen supervision, detention supervision, etc. For example at my school teachers are paid £6 per additional duty that they do, so if a teacher were to volunteer to do break duty every day they'd be making £30 extra per week than those who don't volunteer.

As has been pointed out earlier, getting in early and staying behind is part of the job. Whilst you do have allocated free periods whereby you can mark and plan lessons, these may be taken up by last minute cover and other things which may leave you with no choice but to do your work outside school hours. It's usually the only time that you'll be able to have departmental meetings and time to prepare for the school day by means of photocopying, etc. Whilst you don't necessarily get paid for staying in school late, it will depend on your contracted hours. In some schools I know of teachers who are contracted from 8am-4.30pm. They may only be teaching from 9-3 but this means that they get paid to come in a little earlier and stay a little later - it really depends on the school. Some schools literally require you to be in for the usual school hours (8.30-ish to 3.30) but some teachers elect to stay later, but that's entirely down to you and the school. Some prefer to just take their workload home and do it there.

It should be noted though that the harder you work, the more likely you are to be promoted which will in turn mean that you gain a more substantial salary as time goes on. It should be noted that as a teacher you can expect to have 13 weeks holiday - which is a huge amount more than most jobs. Thus, you can probably afford to spend a bit more (potentially unpaid) time hanging around after school which is definitely beneficial. It gives you a chance to wind down and it's generally more laid back than the school day which is often hectic and busy.

You are paid in the holidays too.
1
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 weeks ago
#19
(Original post by mcd_connor)
Hi,

Generally speaking, teachers are paid a salary which depends on a few things - the location of the school (e.g. London teachers get paid a substantial amount more than teachers in other areas of the country), experience, Teaching & Learning Responsibilities/TLR (e.g. Head of Department, Head of Year positions, etc), subject and potentially a few other things. See this link: https://getintoteaching.education.go...y-scale-salary

Teachers are paid once a month, with their salary divided into 12 equal chunks paid as you'd typically expect to be paid in any other job. Dependent on the school, they may add to your salary if you volunteer to do things such as break duty, canteen supervision, detention supervision, etc. For example at my school teachers are paid £6 per additional duty that they do, so if a teacher were to volunteer to do break duty every day they'd be making £30 extra per week than those who don't volunteer.

As has been pointed out earlier, getting in early and staying behind is part of the job. Whilst you do have allocated free periods whereby you can mark and plan lessons, these may be taken up by last minute cover and other things which may leave you with no choice but to do your work outside school hours. It's usually the only time that you'll be able to have departmental meetings and time to prepare for the school day by means of photocopying, etc. Whilst you don't necessarily get paid for staying in school late, it will depend on your contracted hours. In some schools I know of teachers who are contracted from 8am-4.30pm. They may only be teaching from 9-3 but this means that they get paid to come in a little earlier and stay a little later - it really depends on the school. Some schools literally require you to be in for the usual school hours (8.30-ish to 3.30) but some teachers elect to stay later, but that's entirely down to you and the school. Some prefer to just take their workload home and do it there.

It should be noted though that the harder you work, the more likely you are to be promoted which will in turn mean that you gain a more substantial salary as time goes on. It should be noted that as a teacher you can expect to have 13 weeks holiday - which is a huge amount more than most jobs. Thus, you can probably afford to spend a bit more (potentially unpaid) time hanging around after school which is definitely beneficial. It gives you a chance to wind down and it's generally more laid back than the school day which is often hectic and busy.

You are paid in the holidays too.
Just to clarify, all teachers should get 10% PPA (plus an extra 10% for NQTs) and this shouldn't be used for cover. Some schools give teachers slightly over the 10%, so it's this that can be used for cover. Sometimes a teacher will teach a "twilight" after school and have a free in the school day because of this, which again can be used for cover, although it's not best practice. Teachers can also be asked to use "gained time" (frees when Y11 and Y13 have left) for cover.
2
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

what's your favourite season?

Summer (65)
32.02%
Spring (37)
18.23%
Autumn/Fall (52)
25.62%
Winter (38)
18.72%
I love them all equally (11)
5.42%

Watched Threads

View All