sharks22
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#1
Hi,

I've just started my Psychology Bsc at King's ( 2 weeks into the course), and I am considering changing courses because i'm concerned about the low career prospects. It's always been nagging me since the day i applied for psychology but I just didn't know what to do. I'm a big fan of neuroscience so my plan was to do a masters in neuroscience after psychology, but funding seems to be a big issue, as i've gathered from my research that it's very difficult to find decent graduate jobs with just an undegrad in psych. I'm not interested in pursuing a PhD so clinical psych or occupational psych is not an option. Also, even though i have taken a liking to neuroscience and psychology, I don't have a true 'passion' or dream job that i'm striving towards, which really bothers me as i really want a good and well-paid career.

I'm debating whether I should switch to an Economics course at City as they don't require maths and allow you to take extra modules if you haven't done maths a level. Problem is, i'm not great at maths and i absolutely detest it, having scraped a 6 in it at GCSEs. But econ seems to have much better career prospects and the geography side of it is quite interesting. I know it may seem silly to switch from a top uni just because of the courses, but my options are quite limited due to my a level choices .

So is it worth switching even if i may end up not liking econ? Or should i continue studying something i like even if i'm always stressing about job opportunities?

Thanks in advance!
0
reply
awakealways
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 weeks ago
#2
10000000% stick with psychology

you will do so much better doing a subject you like than something you might not like. if you want to go into investment banking, they literally dont care what degree you did, just as long you get a 2:1 or 1st
0
reply
hau28
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 weeks ago
#3
One of my friends graduated in Psychology and is now on the civil service fast stream. Furthermore, if you actually want to go into investment banking then your institution matters far more than your degree. You would be more likely to get into the field with a Kings degree than with one from City University. The fact that they don't require A Level maths for their course should be ringing alarm bells for you, because any decent economics course would have A Level Maths as a prerequisite.
0
reply
raihan5678
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 weeks ago
#4
Im in the almost exact situation as you, the career prospects for psychology are really quite dull and im considering changing to economics too despite having no A level in maths or economics. But if you detest maths that much then it'd definitely be an issue studying economics at degree level as it entails quite alot of maths, so stick with psychology and as you enjoy the neuroscience aspect of it try get as much experience as you can during your weekends, holidays or whatever. It'll all add up and will make you stand out more to employers
0
reply
sharks22
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by awakealways)
10000000% stick with psychology

you will do so much better doing a subject you like than something you might not like. if you want to go into investment banking, they literally dont care what degree you did, just as long you get a 2:1 or 1st
thank you for the advice! and wow i had no idea investment banking didn't require a degree, maybe i should just try and do intenrships over summer to gain experience in other fields just in case.
0
reply
sharks22
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by hau28)
One of my friends graduated in Psychology and is now on the civil service fast stream. Furthermore, if you actually want to go into investment banking then your institution matters far more than your degree. You would be more likely to get into the field with a Kings degree than with one from City University. The fact that they don't require A Level maths for their course should be ringing alarm bells for you, because any decent economics course would have A Level Maths as a prerequisite.
yeahh i was wondering why they wouldn't require maths it did seem a bit weird. and thank you for the advice!!
0
reply
sharks22
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by raihan5678)
Im in the almost exact situation as you, the career prospects for psychology are really quite dull and im considering changing to economics too despite having no A level in maths or economics. But if you detest maths that much then it'd definitely be an issue studying economics at degree level as it entails quite alot of maths, so stick with psychology and as you enjoy the neuroscience aspect of it try get as much experience as you can during your weekends, holidays or whatever. It'll all add up and will make you stand out more to employers
join the club lool, it's really stressful isn't it :/
yh i really hate maths but idk i thought maybe it would've been worth it and i should jsut fight through the econ degree. But then again i don't want to be miserable for 3 years. (also was considering switching to a law degree but it's terribly competitive)
and good luck making a decision between psych and econ!
0
reply
ajj2000
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by sharks22)
Problem is, i'm not great at maths and i absolutely detest it, having scraped a 6 in it at GCSEs. But econ seems to have much better career prospects and the geography side of it is quite interesting. I know it may seem silly to switch from a top uni just because of the courses, but my options are quite limited due to my a level choices .


Economics is not for you. Its valuable because of its maths content. If you have some real interest in it you would be better placed seeing if you could improve your standard of maths and get through A level.
0
reply
sharks22
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by ajj2000)
Economics is not for you. Its valuable because of its maths content. If you have some real interest in it you would be better placed seeing if you could improve your standard of maths and get through A level.
yep i just never considered doing economics at uni until now so i never bothered taking maths. thanks for the advice!
0
reply
AW_1983
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 week ago
#10
(Original post by sharks22)
Hi,

I've just started my Psychology Bsc at King's ( 2 weeks into the course), and I am considering changing courses because i'm concerned about the low career prospects. It's always been nagging me since the day i applied for psychology but I just didn't know what to do. I'm a big fan of neuroscience so my plan was to do a masters in neuroscience after psychology, but funding seems to be a big issue, as i've gathered from my research that it's very difficult to find decent graduate jobs with just an undegrad in psych. I'm not interested in pursuing a PhD so clinical psych or occupational psych is not an option. Also, even though i have taken a liking to neuroscience and psychology, I don't have a true 'passion' or dream job that i'm striving towards, which really bothers me as i really want a good and well-paid career.

I'm debating whether I should switch to an Economics course at City as they don't require maths and allow you to take extra modules if you haven't done maths a level. Problem is, i'm not great at maths and i absolutely detest it, having scraped a 6 in it at GCSEs. But econ seems to have much better career prospects and the geography side of it is quite interesting. I know it may seem silly to switch from a top uni just because of the courses, but my options are quite limited due to my a level choices .

So is it worth switching even if i may end up not liking econ? Or should i continue studying something i like even if i'm always stressing about job opportunities?

Thanks in advance!
My advice to you is don't underestimate what you can do with a Psychology degree. I've worked in investment banking for the last 16 years (incidentally I have a History degree), I specialise in Compliance and I'm actively looking to start an MSc Psychology conversion next year because whilst the ideas being generated particularly in the subjects of behavioural economics and the psychology of risk are gaining traction in my industry, there is a lack of suitably training people to tap their potential.

Even if that doesn't interest you, I would point out that Psychology is one of those rare hybrid degrees where on the one hand you are trained in statistics and scientific methods and on the other do qualitative research and gain excellent writing skills. There will be plenty of opportunities for you to thrive with a Psychology degree from a reputable institution like KCL and I would strongly advise you to focus on what interests you for the following reasons:

1) You're more likely to get that essential 2:1 degree in a subject that interests you;
2) Economics students like to go around telling people they do a serious degree but at the same time they study something that is less of a science than Psychology and they do so under academics who have been flailing around trying to pretend their subject is still valid despite having no answers to the financial crisis 10 years on let alone the sustained assault on their craft from behavioural scientists for the past half century (most economic theory depends on people acting rationally, and most people don't act rationally);
3) You might not realise it yet, but one day you might be like me in a job you hate and wanting to go back to where your interests really lay. You'll be grateful if you don't have to start studies for a career change from scratch!
1
reply
raihan5678
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 week ago
#11
(Original post by sharks22)
yep i just never considered doing economics at uni until now so i never bothered taking maths. thanks for the advice!
so are you set on doing psychology then? i sat an economics seminar outside of my psychology timetable today even though its almost 4 weeks in so i think its too much of a risk going for econ so im going to stick with psychology and perhaps look for any potential apprenticeships during my first year. A placement year would build up experience and looks good to employers so maybe consider doing that too
Last edited by raihan5678; 1 week ago
1
reply
hau28
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 week ago
#12
You can do see if you can do some elective modules in economics and mention that on your CV
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Surrey
    Postgraduate Open Afternoon Postgraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19
  • University of Bristol
    Undergraduate Open Afternoon Undergraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19
  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Day - Penryn Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 23 Oct '19

Would you turn to a teacher if you were being bullied?

Yes (36)
25.71%
No (104)
74.29%

Watched Threads

View All