Opinions on My 4x a Week Gym Routine? Watch

Polymath0
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My full-body workout regimen:

Monday = Military Press, Deadlift, Quad Extension, Lateral Raise

Tuesday = DB Incline Press, Front Squat, Transverse Extension Row, Barbell Row, Romanian Deadlift, Barbell Curl

Wednesday = Rest + Recovery

Thursday = DB Standing Press, Deadlift, Barbell Row, Face Pull

Friday = Incline Press, Front Squat, Cuban Press, Pulldown cable machine, Tricep Extension, Hamstring Curl, Barbell Curl

I perform 4 sets of 8 repetitions for each exercise, except the lateral raise for which I perform more sets and repetitions.
I aim conservatively to increase the weights by 2.5kg per fortnight, which amounts to a 5kg increase per month.

Are the composition of exercises logical? Do I need to add, remove or alter any exercises? Is there any way I can enhance the effectiveness of this routine? Let me know.
Last edited by Polymath0; 4 days ago
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999tigger
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Woody will answer all your questions and set up a custom routine for you if you comply with taking over his account.
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Polymath0
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Woody will answer all your questions and set up a custom routine for you if you comply with taking over his account.
I do not understand.
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_Wellies_
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It's a random collection of exercises.

Use one of the many tried and tested beginner routines. GZCL is a good one to take a look at.
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HiViz9
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(Original post by Polymath0)
My full-body workout regimen:

Monday = Incline Press, Deadlift, Tricep Extension, Lateral Raise

Tuesday = DB Standing Press, Front Squat, Barbell Row, Romanian Deadlift, Barbell Curl

Wednesday = Rest + Recovery

Thursday = DB Incline Press, Deadlift, Barbell Row, Face Pull

Friday = Incline Press, Front Squat, Pulldown cable machine, Tricep Extension, Hamstring Extensions, Bicep Curl

I perform 4 sets of 8 repetitions for each exercise, except the lateral raise for which I perform more sets and repetitions.
I aim conservatively to increase the weights by 2.5kg per fortnight, which amounts to a 5kg increase per month.

Are the composition of exercises logical? Do I need to add, remove or alter any exercises? Is there any way I can enhance the effectiveness of this routine? Let me know.
I mean no disrespect I am just being honest............. Lifting weights does NOT improve your cardiovascular - heart and lungs. The definition of fitness, physical good health is when your muscles are fed oxygen via the blood - through the lungs and pumped by the heart. This is stamina/staying power - fitness.
I boxed and trained hard. I have had big musclebound guys, insisting on sparring with me because they thought their big muscles was enough. I knew it would be easy-peasy for me to spar them to exhaustion. This happened 3 times over a few months, every time the big guys stopped sparring and gave up within 2- 5 minutes. (1) because they could not breath. (2) when they tried to be clever and hurt me, I simply stuck a powerful punch in their stomach and they gave up. I never bullied, I responded to their trying to be clever because they thought they could easily hurt a much smaller guy. They mistook big muscles for real strength and power... cardiovascular!!
You should use a day for running and only running.
I do not wish to decry what you do and you might totally disregard what I say.
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Polymath0
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(Original post by _Wellies_)
It's a random collection of exercises.
While it may appear so at first glance, a closer inspection will reveal that the composition of exercises on the first two days of the week are made distinct so as to avoid targeting exactly the same muscle groups, and thus compliment the last two training days of the week.

(Original post by _Wellies_)
Use one of the many tried and tested beginner routines. GZCL is a good one to take a look at.
Thanks. My only two reservations with this program is its potential to induce injury. I believe that intensity should be safely built upon a foundation of proven strength, and this is made possible by going two steps forward and one step back. For example, with the DB incline press, I gradually made my way up to 18kg and failed to reach my total rep range at this weight. The next workout session I increased the weight to 20kg, pushed myself and performed less volume than I did at 18kg. However the intensity transferred over into strength, which enabled me to complete my total rep range at 18kg in the following workout session. The muscular tension, damage and repair resulting from the completion of those reps will now enable me to go two steps forward and bench 22kg, and so on. I think this strategy combines symbiotically the benefits of intensity and volume.
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Polymath0
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(Original post by HiViz9)
Lifting weights does NOT improve your cardiovascular - heart and lungs.
Bulk of fitness research suggests otherwise.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1113115430.htm

(Original post by HiViz9)
You should use a day for running and only running.
I am not knocking cardiovascular activities like running, skipping, jumping, swimming, cycling, etc. However, weight resistance training can also be effective tools to build stamina and endurance.
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HiViz9
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(Original post by Polymath0)
Bulk of fitness research suggests otherwise.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1113115430.htm



I am not knocking cardiovascular activities like running, skipping, jumping, swimming, cycling, etc. However, weight resistance training can also be effective tools to build stamina and endurance.
No way. That is totally not correct. Then why is it big guys who pumped iron religiously, day in day out.. could not last 2 minutes in a sparring session? and that I never broke into a sweat nor was worried at all that they might hit me? I am not being arrogant, I have great humility in fact. Boxers get up early and run miles because they know a fight may go 15 rounds with an opponent you can not switch on and off when you are tired. You control weights. Stamina and endurance is only effective when you can NOT sit down and rest whenever you choose.
I agree with the fast repetition of light weights and the principle of resistance to build strength. I shadowboxed with 5 K weight each end of a barbell.. for 3 ..minute rounds.
I am not saying your training is wrong and you are not fit. I am saying, from vast, real experience that cardiovascular is the most important part of keeping fit and strong.
You feel that inner real fitness. Remember, a person who can not breathe can not do anything.
I hope you dont think I am rude or arrogant but I know what I am saying from years of proven hard graft. If I had to fight or spar with a Jockey or a huge weightlifter I would happily pick the big guy.
Do a test. (perhaps you already do) get up one morning, puck a spot, say 2 miles (to the local supermarket or whatever) and run at average speed, comfortable pace, all the way there and back. If you do not heavy breathe and are very fit and comfortable when you get back home.. you are fit. I was a Military Policeman and I trained hard and have never seen a guy who uses weights only, no matter how many repetitions... who had stamina. I am being honest I am not trying to undermine what you do. If you work on your cardio .. you will see immense gains when you lift weights. I guarantee it. Because it is pure fact... you heart pumps blood mixed with oxygen from the lungs to feed your muscles. If blood with oxygen, from a fit heart and lungs is not getting into your muscles.. this is called tiredness/fatigue... your body demanding more oxygen which can not be supplied.
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funk controller
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You’re right about this guy OP, hiviz is a mongoloid, do not take his advice. Fitness has no set definition.

As for the programme, it’s pretty ass, legs two days in a row, very little back work, no real variation in sets and reps. Take a real program, such as gzlp as suggested, and don’t argue with proven programmes that don’t induce injury.
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Polymath0
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(Original post by funk controller)
As for the programme, it’s pretty ass, legs two days in a row, very little back work, no real variation in sets and reps. Take a real program, such as gzlp as suggested, and don’t argue with proven programmes that don’t induce injury.
Back work is present in every workout session. Legs are not directly trained two days in a row.

My variations pivot strictly around intensity: if I fail to achieve my total rep range then I increase the weight by 2.5kg, perform as many reps as I can squeeze across 4 sets and then reduce the weight by 2.5kg in the next session to reach my total rep range as a result of my increased strength capacity.
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funk controller
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(Original post by Polymath0)
Back work is present in every workout session. Legs are not directly trained two days in a row.

My variations pivot strictly around intensity: if I fail to achieve my total rep range then I increase the weight by 2.5kg, perform as many reps as I can squeeze across 4 sets and then reduce the weight by 2.5kg in the next session to reach my total rep range as a result of my increased strength capacity.
Monday and Friday there’s no back. Deadlift and squat next to each other twice. No, deadlift is not a back exercise, it is a leg exercise.
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Polymath0
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(Original post by funk controller)
Monday and Friday there’s no back. Deadlift and squat next to each other twice. No, deadlift is not a back exercise, it is a leg exercise.
Deadlift is an exercise that employs multiple muscle groups that include the lower and upper middle back. It is not strictly a leg exercise; it is a compound lift.

Friday includes the pulldown cable machine which is strictly a back exercise.
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funk controller
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(Original post by Polymath0)
Deadlift is an exercise that employs multiple muscle groups that include the lower and upper middle back. It is not strictly a leg exercise; it is a compound lift.

Friday includes the pulldown cable machine which is strictly a back exercise.
Didn’t notice the pull down, deadlift is still a leg exercise. The prime movers are the hamstrings and quads, and to some degree the lats. The prime movers in the squat are also the hamstrings and quads. Spinal erectors are worked statically heavily in both too. You have RDL and deadlift two days in a row anyway. Low volume back work, no direct traps, no direct rear delts.
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Polymath0
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(Original post by funk controller)
Didn’t notice the pull down, deadlift is still a leg exercise. The prime movers are the hamstrings and quads, and to some degree the lats. The prime movers in the squat are also the hamstrings and quads. Spinal erectors are worked statically heavily in both too. You have RDL and deadlift two days in a row anyway. Low volume back work, no direct traps, no direct rear delts.
It is false to refer to the deadlift as a leg exercise exclusively as it works more than one muscle group. It is a compound exercise.
The RDL is performed on Tuesday which is the day on which I also perform front squats. This is ensure to that both my quads and hamstrings are optimally trained in separate exercises.
Your criticism that I have a low volume back work out is demonstrably false. I perform the Barbell Row on Tuesday and Thursday, and the Pulldown cable machine on Friday. This amounts to 12 weekly sets of 96 reps which is an optimal weekly volume, close to the maximum adaptive volume.

As for rear delt exercise, I perform the Face Pull on Thursday. In this exercise I perform 5 sets of 10 reps.
I do not perform direct work on traps as I am not particularly a fan of overly prominent traps.
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funk controller
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(Original post by Polymath0)
It is false to refer to the deadlift as a leg exercise exclusively as it works more than one muscle group. It is a compound exercise.
The RDL is performed on Tuesday which is the day on which I also perform front squats. This is ensure to that both my quads and hamstrings are optimally trained in separate exercises.
Your criticism that I have a low volume back work out is demonstrably false. I perform the Barbell Row on Tuesday and Thursday, and the Pulldown cable machine on Friday. This amounts to 12 weekly sets of 96 reps which is an optimal weekly volume, close to the maximum adaptive volume.

As for rear delt exercise, I perform the Face Pull on Thursday. In this exercise I perform 5 sets of 10 reps.
I do not perform direct work on traps as I am not particularly a fan of overly prominent traps.
Arbitrary numbers of volume are arbitrary, this is what I’ve learnt from British level strongmen. I face pull 4 times a week, direct traps 5 times a week. Everything is technically a compound exercise, I do not put front squats on upper day just because the lats are used. The prime movers in a squat and deadlift are still the same. You still do legs two days in a row.
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Polymath0
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(Original post by funk controller)
Arbitrary numbers of volume are arbitrary, this is what I’ve learnt from British level strongmen. I face pull 4 times a week, direct traps 5 times a week. Everything is technically a compound exercise, I do not put front squats on upper day just because the lats are used. The prime movers in a squat and deadlift are still the same. You still do legs two days in a row.
Volume is not arbitrary. A certain level of volume can induce metabolic stress necessary to induce hypertrophy.

Why does it matter that legs are employed for two different, staple exercises two days in a row? Deadlift and squat are functionally different, hence do not have the same impact on legs.
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funk controller
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(Original post by Polymath0)
Volume is not arbitrary. A certain level of volume can induce metabolic stress necessary to induce hypertrophy.

Why does it matter that legs are employed for two different, staple exercises two days in a row? Deadlift and squat are functionally different, hence do not have the same impact on legs.
Volume is arbitrary, hence why some guys can do 2 sessions a week and some do 5x full body a week with similar intensity. Function means nothing, you work the same muscles heavily both times, would you max out both alongside each other? The muscles don’t care how they’re worked (very loose statement), muscle tears are muscle tears. If you can recover then whatever though, but unlikely. I should also mention that 4x8 everything has no reason.
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Polymath0
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(Original post by funk controller)
Volume is arbitrary, hence why some guys can do 2 sessions a week and some do 5x full body a week with similar intensity. Function means nothing, you work the same muscles heavily both times, would you max out both alongside each other? The muscles don’t care how they’re worked (very loose statement), muscle tears are muscle tears. If you can recover then whatever though, but unlikely. I should also mention that 4x8 everything has no reason.
I perform deadlift and squat on separate days, and function does matter since the same muscle groups in both exercises are not worked at the same intensity; other compensating muscle groups come into play for each exercise respectively.

4 sets of 8 - 10 has proven to be an optimal range for hypertrophy. I perform just over twice the amount of sets for the DB lateral raise exclusively.
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Deggs_14
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Wow I’ll bet you’ll be very strong and muscular!
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funk controller
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(Original post by Polymath0)
I perform deadlift and squat on separate days, and function does matter since the same muscle groups in both exercises are not worked at the same intensity; other compensating muscle groups come into play for each exercise respectively.

4 sets of 8 - 10 has proven to be an optimal range for hypertrophy. I perform just over twice the amount of sets for the DB lateral raise exclusively.
But the muscles are all worked at a very high intensity still. Farmers carries are different from squats, but I wouldn’t dare touch a max squat after farmers because my legs feel like mince meat. A max deadlift would likely not come off the ground either. All because of the heavy quad usage in all 3.
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