Which high street shops will be around for the foreseeable future? Watch

Emma:-)
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#1
Im sure quite a few have seen the thread about the next high street shops to go.
Well now on the other hand, Which high street shops do you think are doing very well and will be around for the foreseeable future?
0
reply
Andrew97
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
My local butcher.
1
reply
Emma:-)
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#3
I think home bargains and b+m will be around for some time.
They do very well, mainly because they sell items cheaply.
0
reply
fallen_acorns
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 week ago
#4
Not all shops, but for me:

Cafes - something you cant reproduce online
Charity shops - again, not easy to replicate online, and loved by old people who actually still use the high street.
Shoe shops - most people still don't trust buying online or want to deal with the hassel of returning pairs until the right one fits
Garden centers - (not always on the highstreet, but it is in my town), needs a physical presence, and people still love their gardens
Butchers/Bakers/Grocers - you can't replace them with technolgy easily.. and with the emphasis on the enviroment amoung young people, locally sourced, minimally packaged etc. will make a revival for environmental reasons.


For me, id add that there are two businesses that I think are currently doing very well, but will die out in my life time(not soon):

Bookies - allthough they have taken over the highstreet recently, now that the goverment is cracking down on thier machines, and apps/websites are eating away their youth market.. they will face an aging comsumer base that will eventually die out. The companies will survive though, and just cater to the next generation online..

Takeaways - Why do these need an expensive physical shop front in the age of Apps? Except for those around nightclubs that will keep going to cater to drunk people, I think in small towns take-away 'shops' will die out as the businesses move to cheaper areas away from the expensive highstreet, where peopel can order from various apps, and just go to a door to pick it up, or have it delivered. You really don't need a shop front, if your customer base is tech-savy, which it will be in a generation or two.
1
reply
Bang Outta Order
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 week ago
#5
That's exactly why I'm not doing retail and going into e-commerce and warehousing, shipping, logistics type roles! Brick and mortar is still here for sociocultural reasons alone but it hopefully will continue to die. Just a ****ty industry. I might have to face up and do some butchering or scaffolding or manufacturing if push comes to shove...my dad always emphasised the importance of a SKILL. And one of my favourite lecturers said never do barbering.
1
reply
Emma:-)
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#6
(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
That's exactly why I'm not doing retail and going into e-commerce and warehousing, shipping, logistics type roles! Brick and mortar is still here for sociocultural reasons alone but it hopefully will continue to die. Just a ****ty industry. I might have to face up and do some butchering or scaffolding or manufacturing if push comes to shove...my dad always emphasised the importance of a SKILL. And one of my favourite lecturers said never do barbering.
Why?
0
reply
StriderHort
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by fallen_acorns)
Not all shops, but for me:

Garden centers - (not always on the highstreet, but it is in my town), needs a physical presence, and people still love their gardens
TBH I'd think of these as firmly on the decline

The majority of our plants still come from EU and it's uneconomical to produce most in the UK (Certainly in Scotland where I am) especially as heating & lighting costs keep rising. Online sellers, (like almost everything else) have got plant sales nailed now, why would I drive 20 miles to a rural nursery to buy bedding plants at say £20-30 for 24, when i can walk around a virtual nursery online, pick out my plants as plugs, and get the same number, delivered perfectly healthy overnight, for like £6-7? The customer facing garden center will always struggle to compete now.

About the only thing Garden centers have, is for somewhere to GO, it's a nice environment, it can have a cafe, sell other stuff ect....but in each case it's competing with other, dedicated businesses, and losing precious nursery space, hard to win.

Although assuming we leave the EU all will change, complexities in imports will likely make much larger scale UK production viable again, but will quite a price hike.
0
reply
Emma:-)
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#8
(Original post by fallen_acorns)
Not all shops, but for me:

Cafes - something you cant reproduce online
Charity shops - again, not easy to replicate online, and loved by old people who actually still use the high street.

Shoe shops - most people still don't trust buying online or want to deal with the hassel of returning pairs until the right one fits
Garden centers - (not always on the highstreet, but it is in my town), needs a physical presence, and people still love their gardens
Butchers/Bakers/Grocers - you can't replace them with technolgy easily.. and with the emphasis on the enviroment amoung young people, locally sourced, minimally packaged etc. will make a revival for environmental reasons.


For me, id add that there are two businesses that I think are currently doing very well, but will die out in my life time(not soon):

Bookies - allthough they have taken over the highstreet recently, now that the goverment is cracking down on thier machines, and apps/websites are eating away their youth market.. they will face an aging comsumer base that will eventually die out. The companies will survive though, and just cater to the next generation online..

Takeaways - Why do these need an expensive physical shop front in the age of Apps? Except for those around nightclubs that will keep going to cater to drunk people, I think in small towns take-away 'shops' will die out as the businesses move to cheaper areas away from the expensive highstreet, where peopel can order from various apps, and just go to a door to pick it up, or have it delivered. You really don't need a shop front, if your customer base is tech-savy, which it will be in a generation or two.
Very true
0
reply
Wired_1800
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 week ago
#9
(Original post by Emma:-))
Im sure quite a few have seen the thread about the next high street shops to go.
Well now on the other hand, Which high street shops do you think are doing very well and will be around for the foreseeable future?
1. Tesco and other shops like those.
2. The benefits centre.
3. Gambling shops.
4. Petrol stations.
5. Salons and barbershops.
6. High street hotels
0
reply
SMEGGGY
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 week ago
#10
(Original post by Emma:-))
Im sure quite a few have seen the thread about the next high street shops to go.
Well now on the other hand, Which high street shops do you think are doing very well and will be around for the foreseeable future?
W bloody H Smith??! How they are surviving is beyond me. So expensive must have a good financial structure
0
reply
Emma:-)
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#11
(Original post by Wired_1800)
1. Tesco and other shops like those.
2. The benefits centre.
3. Gambling shops.
4. Petrol stations.
5. Salons and barbershops.
6. High street hotels
Deffo petrol stations and salons.
Gambling wise- i think the shops will eventually go, as people gamble more online instead. Especially with the limits on the gambling machines etc now.
0
reply
Emma:-)
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#12
(Original post by SMEGGGY)
W bloody H Smith??! How they are surviving is beyond me. So expensive must have a good financial structure
They are pretty pricey i have to admit. The stores in airports, train stations etc seem to do well. How the high street ones are still going is beyond me.
0
reply
Wired_1800
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 week ago
#13
(Original post by Emma:-))
Deffo petrol stations and salons.
Gambling wise- i think the shops will eventually go, as people gamble more online instead. Especially with the limits on the gambling machines etc now.
Yes, that is true. I agree.
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#14
Report 1 week ago
#14
Quite good.

Greggs
Wetherspoons
McDs and KFC.
Wilko and Home Bargains.
Pret

There arent many shops that are immune.
0
reply
NomadicBrit
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 week ago
#15
All the shops are being destroyed by design. The corporations are behind a lot of social engineering; they want the fabric of our communities destroyed and people isolated in the online ghetto.
3
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 week ago
#16
When did you last see a bankrupt funeral director?
1
reply
Wired_1800
  • Political Ambassador
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 week ago
#17
(Original post by nulli tertius)
When did you last see a bankrupt funeral director?
That is a good example. I am just worried that it is a deep profession to have as a career.
0
reply
Rakas21
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 week ago
#18
(Original post by Emma:-))
Im sure quite a few have seen the thread about the next high street shops to go.
Well now on the other hand, Which high street shops do you think are doing very well and will be around for the foreseeable future?
Next is likely to be around for some time. Their sales are now more than 50% online.
(Original post by Emma:-))
I think home bargains and b+m will be around for some time.
They do very well, mainly because they sell items cheaply.
Agreed. Wilko's, B+M, Poundland, Home Bargains, Aldi and Lidl have all adopted an excellent focus on low priced brands.
(Original post by SMEGGGY)
W bloody H Smith??! How they are surviving is beyond me. So expensive must have a good financial structure
WhSmith have a steady business because they have the money to get into train stations, shopping centers and airports ect.. In addition although most of what they sell is low margin they are along with Waterstones pretty much the only book shop chain left and so have been able to do relatively well simply by viewing the high streets decline as one of attrition. It has also avoided taking on debt by being relatively risk adverse which means that while it will never be as dominant as it was, as mentioned it has simply watched its rivals die around it.
1
reply
Emma:-)
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#19
(Original post by Rakas21)
Next is likely to be around for some time. Their sales are now more than 50% online.

Agreed. Wilko's, B+M, Poundland, Home Bargains, Aldi and Lidl have all adopted an excellent focus on low priced brands.


WhSmith have a steady business because they have the money to get into train stations, shopping centers and airports ect.. In addition although most of what they sell is low margin they are along with Waterstones pretty much the only book shop chain left and so have been able to do relatively well simply by viewing the high streets decline as one of attrition. It has also avoided taking on debt by being relatively risk adverse which means that while it will never be as dominant as it was, as mentioned it has simply watched its rivals die around it.
Exactly.
In this day and age, people are always on the look out for the cheapest/best value for money.
Those shops always seem busy as well. There are always plenty of people in those shops.
0
reply
Rakas21
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 week ago
#20
(Original post by Emma:-))
Exactly.
In this day and age, people are always on the look out for the cheapest/best value for money.
Those shops always seem busy as well. There are always plenty of people in those shops.
It's actually always been that way for the most part.

The myth that people started shopping at these places because they became poor is a socialist misnomer. People shopped at expensive supermarkets not because they had more money but because the foreign owned competition before about 1980 did not exist, Britain was a highly protectionist place pre-Thatcher and the older generations especially much more patriotic.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you made up your mind on your five uni choices?

Yes I know where I'm applying (150)
60.24%
No I haven't decided yet (56)
22.49%
Yes but I might change my mind (43)
17.27%

Watched Threads

View All