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Reading v Russell Group

I've been looking over Russell Groups but Reading offers really great subjects, from a Reading Student how are things there and why did you pick it over other Russell Group Unis?
Original post by Jovid
I've been looking over Russell Groups but Reading offers really great subjects, from a Reading Student how are things there and why did you pick it over other Russell Group Unis?

Work out the list of criteria important to you and then compare all your choices to them.
RG has many of the elite unis in but there are also good ones not in RG.

Visit and do your research.

Post this in uni reading section if you want a chance of contacting reading students.
@returnmigrant had some choice views on Reading as a uni so you might listen to him.
Student working at the Cole Museum
University of Reading
Reading
Visit website
Original post by Jovid
I've been looking over Russell Groups but Reading offers really great subjects, from a Reading Student how are things there and why did you pick it over other Russell Group Unis?

Hi,

I'm currently a final year student at the University of Reading and I'll have a go at answering your question.

I've loved my time at Reading. It offers some great courses ran by academics who are really passionate about not just their subject but also about helping students to advance and progress. Both academically, and with general life-type things they're so supportive - an open-door policy, academic tutors, support centers, a welfare team, halls events and hotline, careers service, etc.
That supportive atmosphere links in to how friendly everything about the Uni is - which was something I loved when I visited during an open day.
Campus is also beautiful, it's a place I feel at home.
Although Reading might not be part of the Russell Group it's a well-respected Uni, especially for research output.

I picked Reading over Russell Group uni's for those reasons really. When you're researching uni's it's easy to focus on things like Russell Group, League tables, etc. however, whilst those things might be of importance to you, it's also important to think about whether it's somewhere you can be happy, somewhere you feel like you'll do well, somewhere that offers all the things you need/want in the ways you need/want - none of those questions can be answered by the fact a Uni is/isn't part of the Russell Group.
Therefore, if you're interested in a course at Reading I'd definitely recommend coming to an open-day or booking to visit at another time, and contacting the department you're interested in, etc. That way you'll be able to start thinking about all aspects of the Uni to then be able to make fully-informed choices.

I hope that helps a little,

Emma
(4th Year Chemistry Student)
Reply 3
Original post by UniofReading
Hi,

I'm currently a final year student at the University of Reading and I'll have a go at answering your question.

I've loved my time at Reading. It offers some great courses ran by academics who are really passionate about not just their subject but also about helping students to advance and progress. Both academically, and with general life-type things they're so supportive - an open-door policy, academic tutors, support centers, a welfare team, halls events and hotline, careers service, etc.
That supportive atmosphere links in to how friendly everything about the Uni is - which was something I loved when I visited during an open day.
Campus is also beautiful, it's a place I feel at home.
Although Reading might not be part of the Russell Group it's a well-respected Uni, especially for research output.

I picked Reading over Russell Group uni's for those reasons really. When you're researching uni's it's easy to focus on things like Russell Group, League tables, etc. however, whilst those things might be of importance to you, it's also important to think about whether it's somewhere you can be happy, somewhere you feel like you'll do well, somewhere that offers all the things you need/want in the ways you need/want - none of those questions can be answered by the fact a Uni is/isn't part of the Russell Group.
Therefore, if you're interested in a course at Reading I'd definitely recommend coming to an open-day or booking to visit at another time, and contacting the department you're interested in, etc. That way you'll be able to start thinking about all aspects of the Uni to then be able to make fully-informed choices.

I hope that helps a little,

Emma
(4th Year Chemistry Student)

Ok, that's good. I was worried at the start about where to go, everybody's so focused on Russel Groups after all
A Durham University academic, Vikki Boliver, published a report in 2015 claiming that the prestigious position of the Russell Group was not based on evidence, but rather successful marketing. Only the universities of Oxford and Cambridge were significantly more elite than the majority of "old" universities when a grouping analysis was performed using data on academic selectivity, research activity, teaching quality, socio-economic exclusivity and economic resources. The other 22 members of the Russell Group sit in a second tier of universities along with 17 other "old" universities (University of Aberdeen, University of Bath*, University of Dundee, University of East Anglia*, Goldsmiths*, Heriot-Watt University, University of Kent, Lancaster University*, University of Leicester*, Loughborough University*, University of Reading*, Royal Holloway*, University of St Andrews*, SOAS*, University of Strathclyde, University of Surrey* and University of Sussex*), mostly comprising former members of the defunct 1994 Group (shown by asterisks). Another 13 "old" universities and 54 "new" universities made up a third tier, with a fourth tier of 19 "new" universities. Within each tier, the differences between the institutions were less significant than the differences between the tiers.[71][72] This reflected an earlier result from 2010 that, when the "Golden Triangle" universities (defined in the study as Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, LSE, and UCL) were omitted, the remaining (then) members of the Russell Group were outperformed by the (then) members of the 1994 Group.
I'm in my first year at Reading, and I'm really enjoying it. Firstly, your course choice is the most important factor. I study English Lit and Film- and this alone cut out practically all the Russell Group universities. At the time I wanted to go to York, and so I visited on both the Film and English courses separately to see whether picking a single honours would be worth it to go to York. But it really wasn't. I then visited Reading and really loved what I saw, made it my first choice, and here we are.

Admittedly, I know a lot of people for whom Reading was their insurance choice, which surprised me quite a lot. The grade acceptances certainly aren't the highest, and they'd managed to get into Reading but not their firm choices. However, I actually got A* A B at A-level, and still wanted to come here, despite the fact that those grades could've got me somewhere higher on the league tables. Hope that helps a little.
I studied at Reading and was not surprised recently to learn it ranks in the top 1% of world universities and is in the top 200 research universities globally. It is a highly respected university. I had a first class education there and its social scene gave me the life skills I have found so valuable. I loved my time there. Yet it is not in the Russell Group. This begs the question of what does membership of this self-proclaimed elite group mean? It means that the universities in that group are certainly good but that there are other institutions that are not within the group that are just as good, if not better, in terms of academic excellence and research profile. It's just that they have chosen not to belong to this 'gentleman's club'. If you refer to the academic league tables, you will see that Reading ranks higher than quite a few of the RG universities. Bear in mind, too, that high ranking universities (whether in the RG or not) attract academics who are more focused on their research than teaching and this could alienate students who seek close supervision. This was not my experience at Reading, however.
RG is overrated, it's not like the US Ivy league.

I got into Queen Mary and King's College and decided on Reading's MSc Finance program over them. Look for how your program ranks in that subject.
Reply 8
Please I need advise. MBA in business analytics (STEM) at University of Aberdeen or MIM (international business) in Henley business school (Reading). Which is better and had more opportunities?
Please in University of Aberdeen MBA in business analytics (STEM) and University of Reading (Henley) MIM(International Business) which is better and provide higher job prospects in the UK
Original post by Sarinem
Please I need advise. MBA in business analytics (STEM) at University of Aberdeen or MIM (international business) in Henley business school (Reading). Which is better and had more opportunities?


Hi Sarinem,
Whilst I can't speak for the University of Aberdeen, I can assure you that our Masters course of International Business and Finance is excellent! Henley Business School is renowned for its teaching methods and practical application of your learning, and is constantly seeking to support its students in terms of study and employability. Therefore, there would be frequent opportunities for you to interact with guest speakers and partake in skills and leadership training to set you up for success.

The course itself is composed of a variety of teaching and assessment methods including written assignments, group projects, presentations, simulations, and even work placements and field visits. You can find out all about it here!

I
hope this has proved useful to you - if you have any more questions don't hesitate to get in touch! :smile:

Kath
3rd Year History Undergraduate :smile:

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