NHS (from uni) vs. EU health insurance Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 6 days ago
#1
Dear tsr,

First of all, please help me move this thread if I have posted it in the inappropriate forum.
I am an EU student just having started my degree in England, UK. I have registered with a GP last week. I do not really understand what is the NHS covering for me while I will be studying here (3-4 years at least) so I have thought of making a medical insurance.

Is this worth it? Or is the NHS covering for meds and hospitalization (God forbid)?

What is exactly the NHS covering for? e.g. important medical issues such as chronic disease or just regular stuff (cold, flu, etc)

If the NHS does not cover for much, any recommendations for a good EU medical insurance which can also cover the periods I will be staying at home during the holidays?

Cheers! And all the best in your new university year!
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_Mia101
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#2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Dear tsr,

First of all, please help me move this thread if I have posted it in the inappropriate forum.
I am an EU student just having started my degree in England, UK. I have registered with a GP last week. I do not really understand what is the NHS covering for me while I will be studying here (3-4 years at least) so I have thought of making a medical insurance.

Is this worth it? Or is the NHS covering for meds and hospitalization (God forbid)?

What is exactly the NHS covering for? e.g. important medical issues such as chronic disease or just regular stuff (cold, flu, etc)

If the NHS does not cover for much, any recommendations for a good EU medical insurance which can also cover the periods I will be staying at home during the holidays?

Cheers! And all the best in your new university year!
The NHS provides free healthcare for most health related issues. However, if you need a prescription I believe you need to pay for it (it's subsidized I think) unless you are under 16, over 60, or have a chronic disease. So yeah, if you get sick the NHS would cover it. Post-Brexit however, I don't know what'll happen.

Also to move you need a CA I think. Glaz
Last edited by _Mia101; 6 days ago
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Glaz
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(Original post by _Mia101)
The NHS provides free healthcare for most health related issues. However, if you need a prescription I believe you need to pay for it (it's subsidized I think) unless you are under 16, over 60, or have a chronic disease. So yeah, if you get sick the NHS would cover it. Post-Brexit however, I don't know what'll happen.

Also to move you need a CA I think. Glaz
thanks for the tag - i’ll move it tomorrow when i get on my laptop
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Glaz
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(Original post by _Mia101)
Also to move you need a CA I think. Glaz
Hey!

I had a closer look at this, and it's fine in the forum it's in, but :ta: so much for the tag
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heidigirl1
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For adults the only things you need to pay for are
-Prescription medication (in England-Scotland and Wales have free prescriptions). It's about £9 per item. You don't pay for medications in hospital.
-Dental care. There are fixed price bands for treatment however, the most you can pay for a whole course of treatment (i.e. it is not per individual thing-you go to the dentist, they will work out everything that needs doing and all of it will be considered a single course of treatment no matter how many appointments you have) is ~£200 but this would only be extensive treatment like crowns; most dental treatment including extractions and fillings are under the ~£60 price band. So even if you needed loads of fillings and had several appointments, you'd still only pay £60 in total.
-Eye tests and glasses.

If you have a low income however, you can fill in an HC1 form (you'll find it if you google 'NHS HC1 form') and you may get some of these things free/at a reduced cost.

Everything else is covered (GP treatment, emergency care, hospital care, referrals to specialists etc). You should be fine even with Brexit if you've already started your course before we exit the EU. Your EHIC card will still be valid.

Try and respect the resources-i.e. don't see your GP just because you have a cough or cold. When making appointments it's always worth asking if the practice nurse can deal with your problem rather than GP (to free up the GP for people who really need them). You can also see a pharmacist for minor illnesses and injuries and they can give advice on over-the-counter treatments.
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_Mia101
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(Original post by Glaz)
Hey!

I had a closer look at this, and it's fine in the forum it's in, but :ta: so much for the tag
Ah ok :oops:
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Anonymous #1
#7
Report Thread starter 4 days ago
#7
(Original post by _Mia101)
The NHS provides free healthcare for most health related issues. However, if you need a prescription I believe you need to pay for it (it's subsidized I think) unless you are under 16, over 60, or have a chronic disease. So yeah, if you get sick the NHS would cover it. Post-Brexit however, I don't know what'll happen.

Also to move you need a CA I think. Glaz
Thanks for your reply!
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 4 days ago
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(Original post by heidigirl1)
For adults the only things you need to pay for are
-Prescription medication (in England-Scotland and Wales have free prescriptions). It's about £9 per item. You don't pay for medications in hospital.
-Dental care. There are fixed price bands for treatment however, the most you can pay for a whole course of treatment (i.e. it is not per individual thing-you go to the dentist, they will work out everything that needs doing and all of it will be considered a single course of treatment no matter how many appointments you have) is ~£200 but this would only be extensive treatment like crowns; most dental treatment including extractions and fillings are under the ~£60 price band. So even if you needed loads of fillings and had several appointments, you'd still only pay £60 in total.
-Eye tests and glasses.

If you have a low income however, you can fill in an HC1 form (you'll find it if you google 'NHS HC1 form') and you may get some of these things free/at a reduced cost.

Everything else is covered (GP treatment, emergency care, hospital care, referrals to specialists etc). You should be fine even with Brexit if you've already started your course before we exit the EU. Your EHIC card will still be valid.

Try and respect the resources-i.e. don't see your GP just because you have a cough or cold. When making appointments it's always worth asking if the practice nurse can deal with your problem rather than GP (to free up the GP for people who really need them). You can also see a pharmacist for minor illnesses and injuries and they can give advice on over-the-counter treatments.
Thanks for covering all these aspects. Yeah, I have started my course in Sept, so technically before Brexit. My EHIC card expired two years ago when I was studying for my other degree, so I still don't have one...
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