World Mental Health Day: PAPYRUS is on The Student Room Watch

StrawberryDreams
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PAPYRUS are answering your questions this World Mental Health Day



This World Mental Health Day, we want to make sure you all have the ability to talk about your mental health, let people know if you're struggling, or make sure you have the tools to ask for help if you need it. The theme this year is Suicide Prevention, and how we can all work together to create a suicide safer community.

Today, we have the lovely PAPYRUS, the charity that works for the prevention of young suicide on site to help you with understand how to talk to someone who you are worried about, or start that conversation about people's mental health or thoughts of suicide.

They have some great tips to help you to start the tricky conversation around suicide with friends or family, which are listed below and in a PDF for you to take a look at:


Ask someone directly - "Are you thinking about suicide?" By using the word suicide, you are telling that person it's ok to talk about their thoughts of suicide with you.



If they are feeling suicidal, listen to them and let them express their feelings. They may feel a huge sense of relief that someone is willing to hear these difficult thoughts.



Reassure them they are not alone, and you can look for support together.



Suicide is the biggest killer of young people–male and female–under 35 in the UK. PAPYRUS believe that everyone has a role to play in preventing young suicide, and that we need to work towards a community where suicide is no longer taboo and young people feel able to tell someone if they feel suicidal and ask for help.

Do you have any experiences of talking to someone around thoughts of suicide, or had anyone help you when you we feeling low? How would you feel about talking to someone who may be experiencing thoughts of suicide, would you be confident or not sure what to say?

One of PAPYRUS's Hopeline advisers will be online today to answer your questions around suicide prevention, mental health and raising awareness. Why not ask them a question below now?


If your question/comment/reply contains information that some people may find difficult, please spoiler your sentences and write 'Trigger Warning' above, with a short description of what it is e.g.
"Trigger Warning: Suicide"

We're speaking about all areas of Mental Health this World Mental Health Day here on TSR. You can check out our hub thread here.
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shadowdweller
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How would you recommend supporting someone long-term who is struggling with suicidal thoughts?

What volunteering opportunities do you have?
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PAPYRUS-UK
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(Original post by StrawberryDreams)

TW: Conversations around suicide

PAPYRUS are answering your questions this World Mental Health Day

https://media.giphy.com/media/3ohhwu...A8Q8/giphy.gif

This World Mental Health Day, we want to make sure you all have the ability to talk about your mental health, let people know if you're struggling, or make sure you have the tools to ask for help if you need it. The theme this year is Suicide Prevention, and how we can all work together to create a suicide safer community.

Today, we have the lovely PAPYRUS, the charity that works for the prevention of young suicide on site to help you with understand how to talk to someone who you are worried about, or start that conversation about people's mental health or thoughts of suicide.

They have some great tips to help you to start the tricky conversation around suicide with friends or family, which are listed below and in a PDF for you to take a look at:


Ask someone directly - "Are you thinking about suicide?" By using the word suicide, you are telling that person it's ok to talk about their thoughts of suicide with you.



If they are feeling suicidal, listen to them and let them express their feelings. They may feel a huge sense of relief that someone is willing to hear these difficult thoughts.



Reassure them they are not alone, and you can look for support together.



Suicide is the biggest killer of young people–male and female–under 35 in the UK. PAPYRUS believe that everyone has a role to play in preventing young suicide, and that we need to work towards a community where suicide is no longer taboo and young people feel able to tell someone if they feel suicidal and ask for help.

Do you have any experiences of talking to someone around thoughts of suicide, or had anyone help you when you we feeling low? How would you feel about talking to someone who may be experiencing thoughts of suicide, would you be confident or not sure what to say?

One of PAPYRUS's Hopeline advisers will be online today to answer your questions around suicide prevention, mental health and raising awareness. Why not ask them a question below now?


If your question/comment/reply contains information that some people may find difficult, please spoiler your sentences and write 'Trigger Warning' above, with a short description of what it is e.g.
"Trigger Warning: Suicide"

We're speaking about all areas of Mental Health this World Mental Health Day here on TSR. You can check out our hub thread here.
Hi there everyone!

My name is Poppy and I am a Suicide Prevention Adviser on HOPELINEUK. I am here to answer any questions you may have about suicide prevention. We understand it can be scary, however - here is a safe space to ask any questions you may have.

Also, please know that you can call HOPELINEUK on 0800 068 41 41 and speak to an adviser directly - they will be there to help.

Best Wishes,

Poppy :flower2:
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PAPYRUS-UK
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(Original post by shadowdweller)
How would you recommend supporting someone long-term who is struggling with suicidal thoughts?

What volunteering opportunities do you have?
Hi shadowdweller,

On HOPELINEUK we support those experiencing thoughts of suicide by developing a plan to keep them safe - this is a plan to keep them safe in that moment, however it is something that they can turn to whenever these thoughts become overwhelming. As part of this plan, we also explore longer term options for getting a person the support they need and deserve. We do this by exploring other services in their local area or medical professionals who can support them in the long-term.

At PAPYRUS Prevention of Young Suicide, we have volunteers called 'Champions' who go out and deliver training sessions on behalf of the charity. If this is something you are interested in, it could be useful contacting [email protected].

We hope that helps and thanks for your question!

Best Wishes,

Poppy :flower2:
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My brother has been really struggling with university and is becoming really distant from us all at home not answering our calls sometimes and stuff, and Im worried about it. He's had issues before and he had to go to counselling, and I'm scared the same thing is happening to him again. How do I get him to talk to me?
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PAPYRUS-UK
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(Original post by Anonymous)
My brother has been really struggling with university and is becoming really distant from us all at home not answering our calls sometimes and stuff, and Im worried about it. He's had issues before and he had to go to counselling, and I'm scared the same thing is happening to him again. How do I get him to talk to me?
Hi there,

You have been really brave reaching out for support for your brother - we understand how tough it can be when someone we care about is struggling. Often, when people are struggling, they may find it hard to open up and do often distance themselves. A really useful way to start this conversation is by looking at our Conversation Starters. This may help you word and structure this conversation - it's also a way for you to introduce your brother to our service.

The more and more you try and have this conversation - the easier it may be for your brother to open up. Would you agree?

Best Wishes,

Poppy :flower2:
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(Original post by PAPYRUS-UK)
Hi there,

You have been really brave reaching out for support for your brother - we understand how tough it can be when someone we care about is struggling. Often, when people are struggling, they may find it hard to open up and do often distance themselves. A really useful way to start this conversation is by looking at our Conversation Starters. This may help you word and structure this conversation - it's also a way for you to introduce your brother to our service.

The more and more you try and have this conversation - the easier it may be for your brother to open up. Would you agree?

Best Wishes,

Poppy :flower2:
Thank you for your help, ill take a look!
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Discrepancy
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Kooth online counselling
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My friend sometimes says worrying stuff when she has a bad day at school or when she gets home and fights with her parents. She sometimes will go missing for a few hours and not tell anyone and then come back and pretend everything was fine when it wasnt and she wasnt very happy before she left.

I want to be there for her but i also know i cant help her on my own, how can i tell her this? Im scared of making it worse, shes my friend and i want to help her.
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Obolinda
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What would you say to somebody who feels they've exhausted all options/treatment pathways?
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CoolCavy
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Why do you have such limited hours that you are open? People dont have mental health issues 9-5 and it would make sense to have your services staffed overnight since that is when people tend to struggle most and other places like the GP etc arent open
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Obolinda
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TW: suicide

Spoiler:
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Do all suicidal individuals have a mental illness?

What do you think we can do to address lesser known/lesser talked about mental illness/problems(that can potentially lead to suicidal ideation)?
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PAPYRUS-UK
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(Original post by Anonymous)
My friend sometimes says worrying stuff when she has a bad day at school or when she gets home and fights with her parents. She sometimes will go missing for a few hours and not tell anyone and then come back and pretend everything was fine when it wasnt and she wasnt very happy before she left.

I want to be there for her but i also know i cant help her on my own, how can i tell her this? Im scared of making it worse, shes my friend and i want to help her.
Hi there,

We hear how scary it can be for you when your friend goes missing - it sounds as though things have been really tough recently and you have been so brave sharing your story with us.

On HOPELINEUK, we always encourage people to be open and honest - this is a lot for you to be dealing with by yourself so telling your friend this and putting boundaries in place is important. Something that we say to a lot of our callers is that 'you can't pour from an empty cup' - you have to look after yourself so that you can support others. It may be really useful for you to look at our 'Conversation Starters' as this can help you to pass on our details to your friend - this way, they have another source of support. We also hear how much this worries you and it is essential that you get support yourself with this - it might be beneficial to call one of our adviser's directly on 0800 068 41 41 so that we can explore this further with you and give you a space to air your worries and concerns.

You are doing an incredible job and your friend is really luck to have your support.

Best Wishes,

Poppy :flower2:
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PAPYRUS-UK
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(Original post by Obolinda)
What would you say to somebody who feels they've exhausted all options/treatment pathways?
Hi Obolinda,

Thank you for your question. We understand how tough it can be when someone feels as though they've exhausted all of their options and treatments and it can feel as though nothing is working. This can be so disheartening. However - sometimes, it can be useful to remind them that any kind of recovery takes time and work - often, it can feel like two steps forward and one step back however, they are still making progress. Often, there may be other sources of support that they may not have tried or even heard of as new things can develop everyday. If there is someone specific that you are concerned about - it may be useful to signpost them to HOPELINEUK (0800 068 41 41) and hopefully, we can help them to explore other options.

There is help and there is hope out there - we hope that we can support this person in finding it. Another really useful resource could also be 'Hub of Hope' - this enables people to find localised support.

We hope this was helpful!

Best Wishes,

Poppy :flower2:
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Why do you have such limited hours that you are open? People dont have mental health issues 9-5 and it would make sense to have your services staffed overnight since that is when people tend to struggle most and other places like the GP etc arent open
Hi CoolCavy,

Thank you for your question. As a service, we are open every day of the year from 9am - 10pm during the week and 2pm - 10pm weekends and Bank Holidays. We completely understand that a lot of individuals struggle overnight and, because of this, our aim in the future is to be a 24/7 service. However, as a charity, we receive no Government funding and rely solely on donations and fundraising - this source of income is primarily from those who have sadly been bereaved by suicide. In recent years, our opening hours have extended and we hope that this continues further so that we can support as many individuals as possible.

We hope that this helps to answer your question.

Best Wishes,

Poppy :flower2:
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(Original post by Obolinda)
TW: suicide

Spoiler:
Show
Do all suicidal individuals have a mental illness?

What do you think we can do to address lesser known/lesser talked about mental illness/problems(that can potentially lead to suicidal ideation)?
Hi Obolinda,

Looking at themes discussed on HOPELINEUK, not all suicidal individuals have a mental illness. Often, a person can be suicidal for many different reasons - more often than not, a persons suicidal thoughts may be due to a significant event with a feeling of loss associated to it - an example of this could be bereavement. Therefore, it is something that may have happened for that person which has impacted on them greatly. Significant events can vary depending on the individual - it is important to remember it is what is meaningful to them and to empathise with how they feel at that moment.

However, mental illnesses are also factors which may contribute to a person's thoughts of suicide. For the lesser know/lesser talked about mental illnesses - it is important that they are spoken about safely and openly. This enables to break down any stigma which may be attached and make those who experience different mental health concerns feel more able to talk about how they feel in an open and honest way.

We hope this helps!

Best Wishes,
Poppy :flower2:
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