rosiehellawell
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I'm currently studying both French and Spanish for my GCSEs, I am definitely taking French A level, but undecided about Spanish. I do really enjoy Spanish GCSE, however, my teacher isn't great which makes me feel as though I'd be behind doing it as an A level. I know it is quite a big jump from GCSE to A level as well. If anyone takes both french and Spanish A level, is it helpful or confusing taking both? Would you say doing 2 languages for A level is too much? Thanks!
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zoe002
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I do French and Spanish A Level! I want to study French and Spanish at uni so I am probably a bit biased, but I think they are great (I am not native in either btw). For me, everyone always asks me if I get confused, but I think if you were fine at GCSE you will be fine at A level as well, and they are pretty separate in my mind. I didn't find the jump too difficult, no more than any other GCSE to A level transition, it was more getting used to the style of A level, as GCSE you just talk about yourself, whereas A level you have to talk and know about the history and culture and have opinions on that. It is more difficult, but I think it is a lot more interesting. Also, doing French and Spanish helps me because the exams are set out in exactly the same way, so the exam technique is the same.
It is important to keep up on grammar and vocab (Quizlet/memrise are saviours!) but they aren't as content-heavy as other subjects, so less focus is on knowing content like you would in say History. Any other questions, feel free to ask!
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DrSocSciences
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I did both, and it was fine. However you should study the grades achieved by your teacher’s recent cohorts, and discuss your concerns with your Director of Studies, or Head of Modern Languages.
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rosiehellawell
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(Original post by zoe002)
I do French and Spanish A Level! I want to study French and Spanish at uni so I am probably a bit biased, but I think they are great (I am not native in either btw). For me, everyone always asks me if I get confused, but I think if you were fine at GCSE you will be fine at A level as well, and they are pretty separate in my mind. I didn't find the jump too difficult, no more than any other GCSE to A level transition, it was more getting used to the style of A level, as GCSE you just talk about yourself, whereas A level you have to talk and know about the history and culture and have opinions on that. It is more difficult, but I think it is a lot more interesting. Also, doing French and Spanish helps me because the exams are set out in exactly the same way, so the exam technique is the same.
It is important to keep up on grammar and vocab (Quizlet/memrise are saviours!) but they aren't as content-heavy as other subjects, so less focus is on knowing content like you would in say History. Any other questions, feel free to ask!
Thank you so much
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rosiehellawell
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(Original post by zoe002)
I do French and Spanish A Level! I want to study French and Spanish at uni so I am probably a bit biased, but I think they are great (I am not native in either btw). For me, everyone always asks me if I get confused, but I think if you were fine at GCSE you will be fine at A level as well, and they are pretty separate in my mind. I didn't find the jump too difficult, no more than any other GCSE to A level transition, it was more getting used to the style of A level, as GCSE you just talk about yourself, whereas A level you have to talk and know about the history and culture and have opinions on that. It is more difficult, but I think it is a lot more interesting. Also, doing French and Spanish helps me because the exams are set out in exactly the same way, so the exam technique is the same.
It is important to keep up on grammar and vocab (Quizlet/memrise are saviours!) but they aren't as content-heavy as other subjects, so less focus is on knowing content like you would in say History. Any other questions, feel free to ask!
Thank you so much

(Original post by DrSocSciences)
I did both, and it was fine. However you should study the grades achieved by your teacher’s recent cohorts, and discuss your concerns with your Director of Studies, or Head of Modern Languages.
Unfortunately, my school is tiny (I and 4 others study french in our year) so we don't have either of these
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DrSocSciences
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(Original post by rosiehellawell)
Thank you so much


Unfortunately, my school is tiny (I and 4 others study french in our year) so we don't have either of these
Well you should nonetheless check his/her recent results, and potentially discuss your concerns with your headteacher.
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maddielake
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(Original post by rosiehellawell)
I'm currently studying both French and Spanish for my GCSEs, I am definitely taking French A level, but undecided about Spanish. I do really enjoy Spanish GCSE, however, my teacher isn't great which makes me feel as though I'd be behind doing it as an A level. I know it is quite a big jump from GCSE to A level as well. If anyone takes both french and Spanish A level, is it helpful or confusing taking both? Would you say doing 2 languages for A level is too much? Thanks!
Hi, i just finished A level Spanish, it was the BEST A LEVEL to take. I really enjoyed it. It's fun, sometimes challenging but there's nothing like it. Take the leap. i got to go on an exchange to spain, i'm going to study it at university too. no one ever regrets taking it.
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username4310824
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I did both Spanish and French at A-level and I absolutely loved it! The two subjects definitely compliment each other and I'd say taking both was more a help than a hindrance.

If you enjoy them both then I'd go for it. Going from GCSE languages to A-level is quite a big of a step up but then again, most A-levels are. The only thing I would keep in mind is that languages aren't subjects you can cram a month or two before the exam. You do need to be prepared to dedicate a bit of time towards them every day if you want to get the best grades.
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