SKhagrid
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I am deciding on what sector of engineering I want to go in and chemical engineering and mechanical engineering has interested me the most. But I read somewhere that it is really hard to find jobs when graduating and that chemical engineering is dying out. The only jobs that are highly paid are the ones in oil and gas. All I want to know is that if Chemical engineering will be needed in the future and also if it's true that it's hard to find jobs and if I do would I still get high pay even if I don't join the oil and gas field
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0le
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Chemical engineering will be needed in the future, for example maybe there will be some future jobs in battery cell technology. So I wouldn't rule out chemical engineering completely, but you will need to do more research into it. I would advise mechanical engineering over chemical for the reasons you discuss and just because mechanical seems to have a broader range of applicability in my opinion. Make sure the degree you do is accredited. This should be listed in the university website or you can check here: https://www.engc.org.uk/education-sk...ourse-search/:

Other people will have different opinions and may suggest chemical instead, so it really depends what you want to do at the end of it. Check indeed or reed and for chemical engineering jobs to get an idea.
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SKhagrid
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I am not even sure anymore
I have done so much for chemical engineering already like work experience and wrote my personal statement.
I researched a lot before but never came across these stuff.
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BigPenguin3
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First year chemical engineering student here. The statistics are saying that the demand for chemical engineers is still increasing. With a chemical engineering degree you can work in so many different industries from nuclear to pharmaceutical. Check this out for more info https://www.topuniversities.com/cour...al/guide#tab=1 . If the demand for chemical engineers in the oil and gas sector is increasing then surely it increases in the nuclear or renewable energy sector. Yes the oil and gas sectors pay the most but they aren't the most secure sector due to the efforts of using renewable energy and also these resources are finite. However, at senior level in many sectors the average salary is high. A mechanical engineering degree is good to do too but for me seems to be quite competitive. Let us know what you decide to do.
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swelshie
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It's not really enough to consider a career that is "not dying out". Graduate engineering is not worth pursuing, due to the intense competition for entry level jobs. Simple supply and demand. When the ratio of grads to jobs passes 2:1, you're lucky to gain employment at all, grateful to get starting salaries between £18-25k (far below the median wage for that age group fyi).

Of course there will always be jobs in oil and gas but again you're competing with thousands of people. As a recent grad, to achieve the higher salaries you are referring to takes a phenomenal effort. You would have to have gained experience in the specific sector and be top candidate in a lengthy grad scheme process. There are far better career choices where you aren't pitted against hundreds of suitably qualified people, of which the vast majority will have direct experience from work placements, relevant individual/group projects and extracurriculars as well as graduate level interpersonal, communication and leadership capabilities. For mechanical positions, O&G companies can filter their applicants by number of offshore placements for example (even one O&G placement itself is difficult to come by). The highest oil and gas wages come from living offshore on a rotating shift pattern.

If you can get a decent graduate job, yeah the whole process may have been worth it, but for most the effort put in does not reflect the outcome.
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peeked
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(Original post by swelshie)
It's not really enough to consider a career that is "not dying out". Graduate engineering is not worth pursuing, due to the intense competition for entry level jobs. Simple supply and demand. When the ratio of grads to jobs passes 2:1, you're lucky to gain employment at all, grateful to get starting salaries between £18-25k (far below the median wage for that age group fyi).

Of course there will always be jobs in oil and gas but again you're competing with thousands of people. As a recent grad, to achieve the higher salaries you are referring to takes a phenomenal effort. You would have to have gained experience in the specific sector and be top candidate in a lengthy grad scheme process. There are far better career choices where you aren't pitted against hundreds of suitably qualified people, of which the vast majority will have direct experience from work placements, relevant individual/group projects and extracurriculars as well as graduate level interpersonal, communication and leadership capabilities. For mechanical positions, O&G companies can filter their applicants by number of offshore placements for example (even one O&G placement itself is difficult to come by). The highest oil and gas wages come from living offshore on a rotating shift pattern.

If you can get a decent graduate job, yeah the whole process may have been worth it, but for most the effort put in does not reflect the outcome.
Is this really the case as I was considering either medicine or engineering and I picked medicine (applying this year) so I guess I'm kinda glad I made that choice now
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SKhagrid
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(Original post by swelshie)
It's not really enough to consider a career that is "not dying out". Graduate engineering is not worth pursuing, due to the intense competition for entry level jobs. Simple supply and demand. When the ratio of grads to jobs passes 2:1, you're lucky to gain employment at all, grateful to get starting salaries between £18-25k (far below the median wage for that age group fyi).

Of course there will always be jobs in oil and gas but again you're competing with thousands of people. As a recent grad, to achieve the higher salaries you are referring to takes a phenomenal effort. You would have to have gained experience in the specific sector and be top candidate in a lengthy grad scheme process. There are far better career choices where you aren't pitted against hundreds of suitably qualified people, of which the vast majority will have direct experience from work placements, relevant individual/group projects and extracurriculars as well as graduate level interpersonal, communication and leadership capabilities. For mechanical positions, O&G companies can filter their applicants by number of offshore placements for example (even one O&G placement itself is difficult to come by). The highest oil and gas wages come from living offshore on a rotating shift pattern.

If you can get a decent graduate job, yeah the whole process may have been worth it, but for most the effort put in does not reflect the outcome.

I'm really lost now
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GreenCub
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A degree doesn't guarantee you a job. For engineering in particular, it's especially important to go to a good university and get as much industrial experiences/placements as you can. If I were in your situation, then I'd just apply for whichever type of engineering you find most interesting. Chemical engineering isn't "dying out" and there are lots of fields that you can work in besides oil and gas.
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BigPenguin3
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(Original post by swelshie)
It's not really enough to consider a career that is "not dying out". Graduate engineering is not worth pursuing, due to the intense competition for entry level jobs. Simple supply and demand. When the ratio of grads to jobs passes 2:1, you're lucky to gain employment at all, grateful to get starting salaries between £18-25k (far below the median wage for that age group fyi).

Of course there will always be jobs in oil and gas but again you're competing with thousands of people. As a recent grad, to achieve the higher salaries you are referring to takes a phenomenal effort. You would have to have gained experience in the specific sector and be top candidate in a lengthy grad scheme process. There are far better career choices where you aren't pitted against hundreds of suitably qualified people, of which the vast majority will have direct experience from work placements, relevant individual/group projects and extracurriculars as well as graduate level interpersonal, communication and leadership capabilities. For mechanical positions, O&G companies can filter their applicants by number of offshore placements for example (even one O&G placement itself is difficult to come by). The highest oil and gas wages come from living offshore on a rotating shift pattern.

If you can get a decent graduate job, yeah the whole process may have been worth it, but for most the effort put in does not reflect the outcome.
What? You're saying as if there is no competition for other degrees and your starting salary range might of been as well £0-100k. Engineers do have a higher starting salary on average than other degrees apart from medicine. It might not be easy to get a graduate job straight away but isn't that the case for every degree? With an engineering degree you don't even have to work in industry and can take a different career path. However if you do want to work as a chemical engineer then a year in industry during uni is a great choice. Good luck.
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