How do you know if a compound is more covalent to least covalent and more ionic ?

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username4347578
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#1
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How do you order compounds from the most to the least covalent and the most to the least ionic?
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mgi
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(Original post by ArtmisKco)
How do you order compounds from the most to the least covalent and the most to the least ionic?
You find out and understand what "electronegativity" and "polar" mean and then look up various examples of compounds! Easy.
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username4347578
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Oh I know what electronegativity means and what polar means but how would you order the compounds from most to least covalent and most to least ionic without the use of google
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EierVonSatan
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(Original post by ArtmisKco)
Oh I know what electronegativity means and what polar means but how would you order the compounds from most to least covalent and most to least ionic without the use of google
It's not perfect but you can consider the difference in electronegativity between the two elements (assuming its a simple example!). The greater the difference the more ionic it is likely to be.

Have a look at this

Or is your question more about Born-Haber cycles and covalent character through distortion of ions?
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mgi
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(Original post by ArtmisKco)
Oh I know what electronegativity means and what polar means but how would you order the compounds from most to least covalent and most to least ionic without the use of google
Is this for Gcse or Alevel chemistry? You should not be wortied about using google or youtube. They have some quality stuff that is sometimes better than your school of college notes! But to deal with your problem you first need to list the compound you are talking about and identify each element in them. Then look at the electropositivity and electronegativity of the elements. e.g Group 1 metals - very electropositive. group7 elements such as fluorine -very electronegative. So, for example, Na Fluoride very ionic compared to Iron chloride for example. What is your list?
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username4347578
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Alevel chemistry. So I have these ionic compounds KF Na2O Al2O3 CrBr
And then the covalent compounds are PH3 NO2 SiO2 and Br2
How would you know for each of the two groups of ionic and Covalent t compounds, how they’re ordered from strongest to weakest?
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mgi
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(Original post by ArtmisKco)
Alevel chemistry. So I have these ionic compounds KF Na2O Al2O3 CrBr
And then the covalent compounds are PH3 NO2 SiO2 and Br2
How would you know for each of the two groups of ionic and Covalent t compounds, how they’re ordered from strongest to weakest?
Your full understanding of the strength of electrostatic attraction between atoms and also electron sharing and polarity makes this an easy task to complete. KF is the most ionic!
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username4347578
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(Original post by mgi)
Your full understanding of the strength of electrostatic attraction between atoms and also electron sharing and polarity makes this an easy task to complete. KF is the most ionic!
But why? How do you order them? What do you look at? Do you add the electronegativities up? What do you do?
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cirrostratus
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(Original post by ArtmisKco)
But why? How do you order them? What do you look at? Do you add the electronegativities up? What do you do?
Please don't listen to those who are telling you how "easy" it should be. We all struggle with something; they're patronising you.

For instance, with potassium fluoride, find the e- neg values of both K and F.

Then subtract the higher e- neg value from the lower e- neg value. Since the differences are very high, the compound will be ionic. It's ionic b/c it e- neg differenced are so large that fluorine can remove potassium's outer e-.

here's an excerpt from this website:

" Ionic bonding is shown at the point where the two elements have the largest difference in electronegativity, as in CsF. Covalent bonding is shown where the elements have low or no difference in electronegativity but a high average electronegativity, as in F2. Metallic bonding is shown where the elements have low or no difference in electronegativity and a low average electronegativity, as in Cs. These relationships can be used to predict the type of bonding likely to be exhibited by any compound based on the elements involved."

https://chem.libretexts.org/Courses/...nding_Spectrum

No one should be ridiculed for being confused.

I hope this has helped
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mgi
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(Original post by cirrostratus)
Please don't listen to those who are telling you how "easy" it should be. We all struggle with something; they're patronising you.

For instance, with potassium fluoride, find the e- neg values of both K and F.

Then subtract the higher e- neg value from the lower e- neg value. Since the differences are very high, the compound will be ionic. It's ionic b/c it e- neg differenced are so large that fluorine can remove potassium's outer e-.

here's an excerpt from this website:

" Ionic bonding is shown at the point where the two elements have the largest difference in electronegativity, as in CsF. Covalent bonding is shown where the elements have low or no difference in electronegativity but a high average electronegativity, as in F2. Metallic bonding is shown where the elements have low or no difference in electronegativity and a low average electronegativity, as in Cs. These relationships can be used to predict the type of bonding likely to be exhibited by any compound based on the elements involved."

https://chem.libretexts.org/Courses/...nding_Spectrum

No one should be ridiculed for being confused.

I hope this has helped
No one was ridiculing or patronising anyone. we try to help without actually doing the question!
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username4347578
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(Original post by cirrostratus)
Please don't listen to those who are telling you how "easy" it should be. We all struggle with something; they're patronising you.

For instance, with potassium fluoride, find the e- neg values of both K and F.

Then subtract the higher e- neg value from the lower e- neg value. Since the differences are very high, the compound will be ionic. It's ionic b/c it e- neg differenced are so large that fluorine can remove potassium's outer e-.

here's an excerpt from this website:

" Ionic bonding is shown at the point where the two elements have the largest difference in electronegativity, as in CsF. Covalent bonding is shown where the elements have low or no difference in electronegativity but a high average electronegativity, as in F2. Metallic bonding is shown where the elements have low or no difference in electronegativity and a low average electronegativity, as in Cs. These relationships can be used to predict the type of bonding likely to be exhibited by any compound based on the elements involved."

https://chem.libretexts.org/Courses/...nding_Spectrum

No one should be ridiculed for being confused.

I hope this has helped
Thank you very much! Finally somebody actually explained what was going on. Thank you very much
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username4347578
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#12
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Hi again. For the ordering of the covalent compounds do you find the difference between electronegativities too?
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username5006362
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(Original post by ArtmisKco)
Hi again. For the ordering of the covalent compounds do you find the difference between electronegativities too?
Yes. The less the difference in electronegativity between 2 elements in a covalent compound, the stronger the covalent character/compound.
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(Original post by UnknownCookie)
Yes. The less the difference in electronegativity between 2 elements in a covalent compound, the stronger the covalent character/compound.
Ah thank you! But it’s the opposite for ionic compounds as the bigger the difference in electronegativities then the stronger the ionic bonding
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#15
(Original post by ArtmisKco)
Ah thank you! But it’s the opposite for ionic compounds as the bigger the difference in electronegativities then the stronger the ionic bonding
Yes, the opposite is true for ionic compounds.
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mgi
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#16
(Original post by ArtmisKco)
Hi again. For the ordering of the covalent compounds do you find the difference between electronegativities too?
yes
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joe3289
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#17
(Original post by ArtmisKco)
How do you order compounds from the most to the least covalent and the most to the least ionic?
You can't. They are either have an ionic bond, covalent bond or a metallic bond.
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joe3289
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That's not how it works. You can't bonds on how covalent or ionic they are. They either are or aren't depending on the compound. Like say you have a chemical reaction of Sodium+Chlorine----->Sodium Chloride it's obviously an alkali metal+a halogen so a ionic bond. The ionic bond formed is no more ionic than say Potassium Fluoride or Lithium Bromide. The same for covalent bonds a hydrogen molecule doesn't have a more covalent bond than Hydrogen Chloride or Methane or Water. They are all covalent bonds.
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(Original post by ArtmisKco)
Oh I know what electronegativity means and what polar means but how would you order the compounds from most to least covalent and most to least ionic without the use of google
You can't, it's not how it works. Like there is different strengths attraction between the nucleus and the electron in question but that's to do with reactivity and displacement not how "covalent" a bond is
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(Original post by joe3289)
That's not how it works. You can't bonds on how covalent or ionic they are. They either are or aren't depending on the compound. Like say you have a chemical reaction of Sodium+Chlorine----->Sodium Chloride it's obviously an alkali metal+a halogen so a ionic bond. The ionic bond formed is no more ionic than say Potassium Fluoride or Lithium Bromide. The same for covalent bonds a hydrogen molecule doesn't have a more covalent bond than Hydrogen Chloride or Methane or Water. They are all covalent bonds.
Uh no as I wanted to know how to find out what is more covalent and less covalent in A group if covalent compounds and what is more ionic and less ionic in a group of ionic compounds
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