Examples of Liberal Arts personal statements? Watch

jsaleriaa
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Not going to copy because I've already got my content but as for structure and exactly how to incorporate your own personal input and the various things the different schools offer--completely lost on me. Could anyone offer any help?
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hokyung1121
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(Original post by jsaleriaa)
Not going to copy because I've already got my content but as for structure and exactly how to incorporate your own personal input and the various things the different schools offer--completely lost on me. Could anyone offer any help?
I've applied for Liberal Arts at King's, Exeter and Bristol with receiving offers from all three institutions. I struggled with my personal statement as you know there aren't many information regarding the subject. I think being relevant throughout the statement is very important when it comes to Russel Group universities, not just Liberal Arts - you're not just stating what you've done and the skills you may have learned, but you're linking back to how this has enhanced your passion for the subject or how this will therefore enable you to do certain thing at uni etc. The structure of my statement was as followed: introduction (talked about what made me drawn to Liberal Arts, talked about my childhood - it is a 'personal' statement after all, though you do not want to sound cliche and be like I was interested in Liberal Arts ever since I was 5), Independent project in French (I studied French and talked about how it was more than just learning a new language, it was learning about culture, society and economics etc), how this lead to my interest for independent research and study (talked about my EPQ), how I recreated what I have learned in my EPQ in my other A level subject (talked about Graphics and tied everything together), briefly mentioned my History A level (do mention all three subjects, even though I didn't think it was necessary, it is important that you write something for all A level subjects), architecture work experience (talked about how doing this work experience has allowed me to develop my knowledge of society, urbanisation, globalisation and efficiency - again linking everything together), volunteering at a museum (talked about communication skills and ect), volunteering in school (linking all skills together really), conclusion (why I want to study Liberal Arts). Like a story, your statement must have a beginning, middle and end: what made you interested, how you carried this out through your A levels, how this has enhanced your passion, therefore why you want to study the course. I hope this has helped you and good luck in applying!!
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Interrobang
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(Original post by hokyung1121)
I've applied for Liberal Arts at King's, Exeter and Bristol with receiving offers from all three institutions. I struggled with my personal statement as you know there aren't many information regarding the subject. I think being relevant throughout the statement is very important when it comes to Russel Group universities, not just Liberal Arts - you're not just stating what you've done and the skills you may have learned, but you're linking back to how this has enhanced your passion for the subject or how this will therefore enable you to do certain thing at uni etc. The structure of my statement was as followed: introduction (talked about what made me drawn to Liberal Arts, talked about my childhood - it is a 'personal' statement after all, though you do not want to sound cliche and be like I was interested in Liberal Arts ever since I was 5), Independent project in French (I studied French and talked about how it was more than just learning a new language, it was learning about culture, society and economics etc), how this lead to my interest for independent research and study (talked about my EPQ), how I recreated what I have learned in my EPQ in my other A level subject (talked about Graphics and tied everything together), briefly mentioned my History A level (do mention all three subjects, even though I didn't think it was necessary, it is important that you write something for all A level subjects), architecture work experience (talked about how doing this work experience has allowed me to develop my knowledge of society, urbanisation, globalisation and efficiency - again linking everything together), volunteering at a museum (talked about communication skills and ect), volunteering in school (linking all skills together really), conclusion (why I want to study Liberal Arts). Like a story, your statement must have a beginning, middle and end: what made you interested, how you carried this out through your A levels, how this has enhanced your passion, therefore why you want to study the course. I hope this has helped you and good luck in applying!!
Actually you don't have to talk about your A Levels at all - it should be based on the subjects/topics that interest you in relation to your chosen course. Obviously it's good that you have had some offers, but that is the advice from the PS advisors on TSR. You also don't need to talk about soft skills for an academic course
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hokyung1121
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(Original post by Interrobang)
Actually you don't have to talk about your A Levels at all - it should be based on the subjects/topics that interest you in relation to your chosen course. Obviously it's good that you have had some offers, but that is the advice from the PS advisors on TSR. You also don't need to talk about soft skills for an academic course
Talking about subjects/topics that interests you alone lacks strength. If you’re not going to talk about what you’ve learned over the 2 years then why bother doing A levels in the first place? Surely you were learning something, whether that is content or relating to contemporary issues, and therefore you should include this in your statement. What would be best is you including how the A level subjects have developed your interest for further topics and enquires, talking about any links between the two. Thus, I disagree with what you have said. I have also received all of my offers but did not felt the need to mention that as I’ve applied for History, which in this case is not relevant. Therefore, I think my advices are at least somewhat reliable and useful in my personal opinion. There is no such thing as “soft skills” - any skills you have learned is valuable, again so long as they are relevant. Personally, I think communication is important in subjects like Liberal Arts because the subject is all about communicating what you have learned throughout different disciplines and combining it to produce a conclusion or an outcome. Even when you are applying for oxbridge, you should include something about other skills and extra activities rather than the personal statement being 100% academic. Of course, you would talk about these skills much less than why you are interested in the subject, but it is still there. Again, these are all personal opinion and I’m just saying what I have done to receive offers for Liberal Arts.
Last edited by hokyung1121; 6 days ago
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Interrobang
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(Original post by hokyung1121)
Talking about subjects/topics that interests you alone lacks strength. If you’re not going to talk about what you’ve learned over the 2 years then why bother doing A levels in the first place? Surely you were learning something, whether that is content or relating to contemporary issues, and therefore you should include this in your statement. What would be best is you including how the A level subjects have developed your interest for further topics and enquires, talking about any links between the two. Thus, I disagree with what you have said. I have also received all of my offers but did not felt the need to mention that as I’ve applied for History, which in this case is not relevant. Therefore, I think my advices are at least somewhat reliable and useful in my personal opinion. There is no such thing as “soft skills” - any skills you have learned is valuable, again so long as they are relevant. Personally, I think communication is important in subjects like Liberal Arts because the subject is all about communicating what you have learned throughout different disciplines and combining it to produce a conclusion or an outcome. Even when you are applying for oxbridge, you should include something about other skills and extra activities rather than the personal statement being 100% academic. Of course, you would talk about these skills much less than why you are interested in the subject, but it is still there. Again, these are all personal opinion and I’m just saying what I have done to receive offers for Liberal Arts.
This advice comes directly from admissions tutors, and my experience in reviewing over 1000 PSs for various courses. A Levels are a good basis for studying at degree level, but the admissions tutors will know the basic content of the courses and so talking about them doesn't add anything new that they couldn't have gleaned from your education section. Communication, leadership etc. skills are not relevant for an academic degree. You only need to mention them for vocational courses. Not saying that your PS needs to be 100% academic, but it is not the main focus.
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