What are the best jobs in STEM?

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irismont
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#1
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I'm in year 10 and am currently really enjoying my sciences and maths GCSE's. I've wanted to become a dentist since I was really young, which meant that I didnt really explore other jobs. Just wondering the best jobs in the STEM industry and what kind've qualifications you need for those jobs? Thankyou!!
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UWS
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(Original post by irismont)
I'm in year 10 and am currently really enjoying my sciences and maths GCSE's. I've wanted to become a dentist since I was really young, which meant that I didnt really explore other jobs. Just wondering the best jobs in the STEM industry and what kind've qualifications you need for those jobs? Thankyou!!
Best in what context? Money? Job opportunities? Ideally you should pick a field you're interested in.
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ajj2000
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Perhaps look at what doctors, actuaries and computer programmers do - being pretty different careers in STEM and see why one or another may appeal. Then you can look at related careers and those which require similar skill sets.
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0le
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irismont, the following reflects my own personal experience and interpretation of the job market. I am not a career advisor. Hope it helps.

Dentistry:
Work to become a specialist dentist and offer your services privately. You'll make a lot of money. Working as an NHS dentist I've heard is actually quite difficult and not as easy to make money as you might think.

Engineering:
Mechanical engineering and civil engineering seem to be quite popular right now. Aerospace is quite niche. Chemistry has got smaller because less jobs in the oil industry. Robotic related courses may be quite useful for AI related jobs which seem quite in demand right now. Bioengineering is an interesting niche topic which I also see from time to time too - don't disregard this one. Can enter finance roles.

Maths/statistics:
Lots of data analyst roles and they are all looking for good applied maths skills. Can also do well in finance roles.

Biological sciences:
Medicine is always going to be in demand but competition may also be high - perhaps a medic can chime in here. Lots of people doing medical research. Lots of funding available in medical research particularly areas like cancer.

Physics:
Don't know much about this field.

Computer Science/ICT (and software engineers):
There is always demand for good software programmers and hardware specialists. But beware that competition is going to be very high for these roles too. Have a look out for security based roles - cybersecurity will become more important as protection of data is becoming a bigger issue.
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JamesManc
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Dentists have the highest suicide rate of any job.
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irismont
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(Original post by 0le)
irismont, the following reflects my own personal experience and interpretation of the job market. I am not a career advisor. Hope it helps.

Dentistry:
Work to become a specialist dentist and offer your services privately. You'll make a lot of money. Working as an NHS dentist I've heard is actually quite difficult and not as easy to make money as you might think.

Engineering:
Mechanical engineering and civil engineering seem to be quite popular right now. Aerospace is quite niche. Chemistry has got smaller because less jobs in the oil industry. Robotic related courses may be quite useful for AI related jobs which seem quite in demand right now. Bioengineering is an interesting niche topic which I also see from time to time too - don't disregard this one. Can enter finance roles.

Maths/statistics:
Lots of data analyst roles and they are all looking for good applied maths skills. Can also do well in finance roles.

Biological sciences:
Medicine is always going to be in demand but competition may also be high - perhaps a medic can chime in here. Lots of people doing medical research. Lots of funding available in medical research particularly areas like cancer.

Physics:
Don't know much about this field.

Computer Science/ICT (and software engineers):
There is always demand for good software programmers and hardware specialists. But beware that competition is going to be very high for these roles too. Have a look out for security based roles - cybersecurity will become more important as protection of data is becoming a bigger issue.
Wow thankyou so much for a detailed response!! I think I will look more into computer science as I know it is becoming quite a mas market
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username738914
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STEM isn't really the best way to look at jobs.

There are roughly these broad categories of jobs:

business jobs
of which include:
> business admin (management, business functions, strategy, administrative support etc)
> sales (products/services, property sales, recruitment, pre-sales, post-sales etc)
> professional services (consulting, corporate law, accounting, lobbying etc)
> entrepreneurship (small biz owner, startup founder, real estate developer etc)
> financial services (investment banking, asset management, sales&trading etc)

skilled jobs
of which include:
> creative (music, tv/film/video, animation, design etc)
> cultural (food, sports, games, fine art, crafts etc)
> technical (various engineering roles from MechEng to SWE)
> quantitative (data science/analytics, economics, quantitative finance, epidemiology etc)
> research (academia, industry research etc)

social service jobs
of which include:
> healthcare (medicine, vet medicine, dentistry, nursing, allied health etc)
> social care (counselling, social work etc)
> education (teaching, tutoring, lecturing, coaching, instructing, curriculum design etc)
> legislation, policy and public administration (politics, policy analysis, judiciary, prosecution, regulation etc)
> public security and protection (police, armed forces, national security etc)
> public interest (NGOs, charities, grant-makers etc)

trades and technology jobs
of which include:
trades (joinery, carpentry, electricians, etc)
technology (audio-visual tech, engineering tech, lab tech etc)

N.B. the above is from my work in progress careers web app

So "STEM" can span healthcare (arguably), research, technical and quantitative careers. So it's not particularly useful a marker at all.

Do you want to build or extract/transform stuff (from energy to software to electronics)? Save/improve lives? Keep the financial system running? Be a boss? Play with numbers? Provide a service?

That's how you should be thinking about this not "STEM" and not "best overall career". Both of those things don't help you.
Last edited by username738914; 2 years ago
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