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Sinnoh
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Lostx)
How do you get to stretch the fingers?
Here's an exercise I use. Note it's more about accuracy than being able to stretch usually.

(Original post by Lostx)
I am trying to learn the notes so I googled notes on a guitar and I got a picture of the neck with different notes on. I am confused because some notes have different pitches and I thought all notes with the same letter would sound exactly the same.
It's periodic - notes of a different octave sound alike. The lowest note playable with standard tuning is an E, on the second fret of the 4th string is an E an octave up, then the top string of the guitar is also E but another octave.
So all the playable notes on the guitar, in ascending order, going up 1 fret at a time would be E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E repeating.
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Sinnoh
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#82
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#82
(Original post by Lostx)
I mean being able to stretch fingers so that I can reach the frets for a chord.
I forgot to link the thing anyway -.-
https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1683950448298756
the reason it's difficult is because there's probably no other activity you do where you have to contort your hand like that. I remember struggling to play a G chord when I began. There's no trick really, just doing it lots will make it easier.
Although after 10 years, my left hand can stretch noticeably further than my right.

(Original post by phyf)
Reading off a stave can be hell when playing guitar, have u tried using tabs?
I think it's worth learning how to read sheet music - it's not that difficult to learn anyway and it'll be very helpful for theory later on
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phyf
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#83
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
I think it's worth learning how to read sheet music - it's not that difficult to learn anyway and it'll be very helpful for theory later on
It is worth learning sheet music, nó doubt about it, but the only problem is figuring out which position to play something in, so even having both side by side would help (although, tbh if you only plan to learn guitar there's not much point learning sheet music because it's never asked - even in theory sections of grades I only get asked to play things off a tab)
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Lostx
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#84
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#84
(Original post by Sinnoh)
Here's an exercise I use. Note it's more about accuracy than being able to stretch usually.



It's periodic - notes of a different octave sound alike. The lowest note playable with standard tuning is an E, on the second fret of the 4th string is an E an octave up, then the top string of the guitar is also E but another octave.
So all the playable notes on the guitar, in ascending order, going up 1 fret at a time would be E F F# G G# A A# B C C# D D# E repeating.
Thank you for sharing that exercise, although it does look quite tricky!

Ah I understand now, I guess this is a way to learn scales?
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Lostx
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#85
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#85
(Original post by Sinnoh)
I forgot to link the thing anyway -.-
https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1683950448298756
the reason it's difficult is because there's probably no other activity you do where you have to contort your hand like that. I remember struggling to play a G chord when I began. There's no trick really, just doing it lots will make it easier.
Although after 10 years, my left hand can stretch noticeably further than my right.



I think it's worth learning how to read sheet music - it's not that difficult to learn anyway and it'll be very helpful for theory later on
I can play sheet music because I play the piano as well. I think if I am able to learn the notes on the neck I could potentially pick up a piece of music and play it by reading the music sheet.
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Sinnoh
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#86
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#86
(Original post by Lostx)
Thank you for sharing that exercise, although it does look quite tricky!

Ah I understand now, I guess this is a way to learn scales?
I think learning scales is your best bet for finding out where the notes are - I learned the scales based off left-hand fingering and position in this book of scales.
You'll find that with the major scales there's a pretty obvious sense of where the next note should be so you can guess by ear what the next note is. Maybe try saying the note out loud while you play.
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Lostx
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#87
(Original post by Sinnoh)
I think learning scales is your best bet for finding out where the notes are - I learned the scales based off left-hand fingering and position in this book of scales.
You'll find that with the major scales there's a pretty obvious sense of where the next note should be so you can guess by ear what the next note is. Maybe try saying the note out loud while you play.
I am sorry but I really don’t understand.

The first note is middle C and it has a number 5 underneath in brackets, which I am guessing means on the 5th string? Where is middle C on the guitar? Is it a chord which would make sense because underneath the brackets is the fingering. Please help!
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Sinnoh
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#88
(Original post by Lostx)
I am sorry but I really don’t understand.

The first note is middle C and it has a number 5 underneath in brackets, which I am guessing means on the 5th string? Where is middle C on the guitar? Is it a chord which would make sense because underneath the brackets is the fingering. Please help!
(it's not quite middle C because the stave is an octave lower but just ignore that)
Yes it's the 3rd fret of 5th string, that's the C.
A usual rule of thumb that works is 1 finger per fret - you start with the 2nd finger, the next one is the 4th so you go two frets over with the pinky (to the 5th fret)
You also have to shift your left hand position at some point
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Lostx
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#89
(Original post by Sinnoh)
(it's not quite middle C because the stave is an octave lower but just ignore that)
Yes it's the 3rd fret of 5th string, that's the C.
A usual rule of thumb that works is 1 finger per fret - you start with the 2nd finger, the next one is the 4th so you go two frets over with the pinky (to the 5th fret)
You also have to shift your left hand position at some point
Thanks. How did you know C is on the third fret?


‘you start with the 2nd finger, the next one is the 4th so you go two frets over with the pinky (to the 5th fret)’
I am lost. Sorry.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Lostx)
Thanks. How did you know C is on the third fret?
It just is
Or, to give a more technical answer, the 5th string is A, so the first fret on there is A# (or B flat), then the next one is B, so the next one is C. There is no note 'between' B and C in Western music.

‘you start with the 2nd finger, the next one is the 4th so you go two frets over with the pinky (to the 5th fret)’
I am lost. Sorry.
here's a photo:
Spoiler:
Show

My middle (2nd) finger is on C, the next note in the scale is D which is where my pinky is (a scale just goes up the alphabet, so to speak - the C major scale will go CDEFGABC).
In this photo I've got both C and D held down, both on the 5th string. That's just to show how the fingering corresponds to where you actually put your fingers.

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Lostx
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#91
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#91
(Original post by Sinnoh)
It just is
Or, to give a more technical answer, the 5th string is A, so the first fret on there is A# (or B flat), then the next one is B, so the next one is C. There is no note 'between' B and C in Western music.



here's a photo:
Spoiler:
Show

My middle (2nd) finger is on C, the next note in the scale is D which is where my pinky is (a scale just goes up the alphabet, so to speak - the C major scale will go CDEFGABC).
In this photo I've got both C and D held down, both on the 5th string. That's just to show how the fingering corresponds to where you actually put your fingers.
That makes sense now thank you!
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Admera
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#92
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(Original post by username4995738)
I have never seen any female guitar players before. Maybe you are an anamoly. Which is good.
I'm 17 and I female and I have been playing both classical and electric guitar since I was 8. There's more than you think!
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Lostx
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#93
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#93
I am going to buy a guitar book but I am stuck choosing between 2 books.

These are: https://www.amazon.com/Visual-Guitar.../dp/1495088960
And
https://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Grimoi.../dp/0825835658


One is a lot more expensive than the other so which should I choose?
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Lostx
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#94
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(Original post by Admera)
I'm 17 and I female and I have been playing both classical and electric guitar since I was 8. There's more than you think!
:five:
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