Government to scrap failed online pornography age verification plans Watch

RJDG14
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For the last 2 and a half years, the government had been planning to introduce strict age verification rules on online pornography sites. They passed the law to do so through the Digital Economy Act 2017, but it has been delayed several times due to the fact that it was largely unworkable, there were major privacy issues, and most recently, the government failed to notify the EU, who had to do a review (and would have probably turned it down due to the fact that EU laws prohibit this kind of censorship).

They've now scrapped these proposals, and are instead planning a broader "duty of care" law, which could be far more watered down (aka: search engines have to delist adult sites unless the user opts for them to display them) or could be even worse (aka: non-compliant sites are blocked and any site you sign up to has to collect ID from you), but I'm hoping it will be nearer the first, though I don't personally support any of the censorship laws the British and Australian governments want to impose on us - they're always behind other Western European countries along with Canada and the more liberal US states.

Only the Liberal Democrats were opposed to this law at the time it was passed, and they seem to me like the only party in this country that actually believe in liberty and personal responsibility rather than collective authoritarianism at the moment.
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errrr99
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lucky the law did not go through, otherwise porn users might think porn is a worthwhile hobby. A hobby that makes it worth adopting various technical means of avoiding the proposed restrictions.

At least without restrictions, some people might realise it is harmful AND dumb.
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JWatch
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(Original post by errrr99)
lucky the law did not go through, otherwise porn users might think porn is a worthwhile hobby. A hobby that makes it worth adopting various technical means of avoiding the proposed restrictions.

At least without restrictions, some people might realise it is harmful AND dumb.
NordVPN have been doing a lot of adverts recently. Bet they will be disappointed this law would have earned them a fortune.
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Blue_Cow
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A ludicrous and unworkable plan anyway
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goggleyed
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thank God, it was a stupid bloody rule to begin with!

why the hell should adults have to suffer just because some parents out there don't know how to say no or how to watch over their little darlings
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ANM775
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(Original post by RJDG14)
For the last 2 and a half years, the government had been planning to introduce strict age verification rules on online pornography sites. They passed the law to do so through the Digital Economy Act 2017, but it has been delayed several times due to the fact that it was largely unworkable, there were major privacy issues, and most recently, the government failed to notify the EU, who had to do a review (and would have probably turned it down due to the fact that EU laws prohibit this kind of censorship).

They've now scrapped these proposals, and are instead planning a broader "duty of care" law, which could be far more watered down (aka: search engines have to delist adult sites unless the user opts for them to display them) or could be even worse (aka: non-compliant sites are blocked and any site you sign up to has to collect ID from you), but I'm hoping it will be nearer the first, though I don't personally support any of the censorship laws the British and Australian governments want to impose on us - they're always behind other Western European countries along with Canada and the more liberal US states.

Only the Liberal Democrats were opposed to this law at the time it was passed, and they seem to me like the only party in this country that actually believe in liberty and personal responsibility rather than collective authoritarianism at the moment.
Please include a link next time you are reporting on the news. It's standard procedure.

As for the news itself that is excellent news. I didn't fancy giving all my details to these companies and they'd surely be a lot of porn sites who didn't comply leading to UK users being unable to use these sites. Also they wanted to ban stuff like fisting and female ejaculation too ....so videos of that nature on pornhub would be blocked for UK users
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Obolinda
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😂😂
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Greywolftwo
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(Original post by RJDG14)
For the last 2 and a half years, the government had been planning to introduce strict age verification rules on online pornography sites. They passed the law to do so through the Digital Economy Act 2017, but it has been delayed several times due to the fact that it was largely unworkable, there were major privacy issues, and most recently, the government failed to notify the EU, who had to do a review (and would have probably turned it down due to the fact that EU laws prohibit this kind of censorship).

They've now scrapped these proposals, and are instead planning a broader "duty of care" law, which could be far more watered down (aka: search engines have to delist adult sites unless the user opts for them to display them) or could be even worse (aka: non-compliant sites are blocked and any site you sign up to has to collect ID from you), but I'm hoping it will be nearer the first, though I don't personally support any of the censorship laws the British and Australian governments want to impose on us - they're always behind other Western European countries along with Canada and the more liberal US states.

Only the Liberal Democrats were opposed to this law at the time it was passed, and they seem to me like the only party in this country that actually believe in liberty and personal responsibility rather than collective authoritarianism at the moment.
It’s not about censorship at all, saying that we are behind other countries is ridiculous, the laws are simply about trying to protect children online
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Delusion6
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doesn't surprise me at all, most people in government most likely watch porn themselves. of course they would never have gone through with this!
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JanusGodofDoors
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While the intentions behind this law might well have been good, it was an enormous threat to personal privacy, and was likely to be incredibly difficult to enforce anyway. Instead of undermining personal freedoms by trying to crack down on pornography, the government needs to prioritise sex ed, so consumers actually understand what they are watching.
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MonkeyChunks
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What I find ludicrous is the suggestion that porn is dangerous. We all have imaginations right? I am sure almost all of us have imagined sexual encounters similar to the likewise fantasies played out on the internet for us.
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Dez
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The law was technologically backward even in 2017, now in 2019 it is practically pointless to continue. ESNI (in beta right now) will undo all of the UK's current and future censorship of the web. Once it gets rolled out to mainstream browsers what will they do? You can't block access to websites with full end-to-end encryption, becuase at that point you have no idea what content is being accessed besides an IP address (and a single IP address could host millions of different websites).
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Kitten in boots
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It was always unworkable.

But it was never about it's viability, it was always about offering a policy that big government social conservatives like.
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RJDG14
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But aren't the Tories a pro-small government party? Or is that the Lib-Dems?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Kitten in boots)
It was always unworkable.

But it was never about it's viability, it was always about offering a policy that big government social conservatives like.
Something for the Daily Mail and Daily Express.
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RJDG14
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Ficitonal Daily Mail headline: The Lib-Dems WANT your children to view porn!

(saw that from someone else, but it's exactly the kind of thing they'd publish)

The reason why the Lib-Dems were opposed to the proposal wasn't that they want minors to view porn, but rather because they believe in individual freedoms and responsibility, and believe that it should be the responsibility of parents, not the government, to regulate children's access to it. This very much mirrors the views of the Democrats in the USA, which are basically America's Lib-Dems policy-wise, although they're officially more their version of Labour.
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