Anagogic
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In the marking rubric it states that the word count is 2000 words, excluding the use of references and tables.

Does that mean that paraphrasing does not affect the word the count?
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Liverpool Hope University
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(Original post by Anagogic)
In the marking rubric it states that the word count is 2000 words, excluding the use of references and tables.

Does that mean that paraphrasing does not affect the word the count?
Hi there Anagogic

If the marking rubic states it excludes the references and tables than that's the only thing excluded in the word count. If you are unsure, I'd recommend talking to your tutors about what you can exclude in the count.

Fi :horse:
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anagogic)
In the marking rubric it states that the word count is 2000 words, excluding the use of references and tables.

Does that mean that paraphrasing does not affect the word the count?
Ummm, no.... Why is 'paraphrasing' part of either references or tables?
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mnot
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(Original post by Anagogic)
In the marking rubric it states that the word count is 2000 words, excluding the use of references and tables.

Does that mean that paraphrasing does not affect the word the count?
ALL MAIN BODY TEXT most likely.

So essentially,
references, bibliography and then labels for figures, text in tables, appendices and also most likely cover page and contents do not count.

In text citations most likely will count.
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Anagogic
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Ummm, no.... Why is 'paraphrasing' part of either references or tables?
Technically it's still a "reference" but you are showing that you understand what is being said.
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gjd800
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(Original post by Anagogic)
Technically it's still a "reference" but you are showing that you understand what is being said.
No
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Anagogic)
Technically it's still a "reference" but you are showing that you understand what is being said.
Technically it is certainly not a reference. The reference (the clue is in the name) is the section the reader refers to in order to understand which previous work you referred to in writing your piece. If you quote or paraphrase parts of those works it will be in the main body of the essay, not among the references.
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Anagogic
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(Original post by Good bloke)
Technically it is certainly not a reference. The reference (the clue is in the name) is the section the reader refers to in order to understand which previous work you referred to in writing your piece. If you quote or paraphrase parts of those works it will be in the main body of the essay, not among the references.
It still requires an in-text citation, so how is it not a reference?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Anagogic)
It still requires an in-text citation, so how is it not a reference?
When it says 'excluding the use of references', what it means is that the words which spell out the reference don't contribute to the word count. Taking an inline citation (and presuming that your regulations exempt in-line citations from the word count too) as an example, were you to write: "It's not that complicated, and 'counting words is really easy' (Muddled et al, 2018)", the word count would be ten, because 'Muddled et al, 2018' are part of the reference. Similarly, the full reference for Muddled, found at the end in the References section, would also not be included in the word count.

Words in tables don't contribute to the word count. However, usually where there is excessive use of text contained in tables, it usually does count. This is to prevent students attempting to subvert the word count regulations by 'smuggling' text in.

Remember that someone has to read all of this, so be frugal with your work count. Brevity and concision are virtues.


You could argue that the word count is actually eleven, because "it's" is a contraction of 'it is'. But we'll stick to the above for now.
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Anagogic
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(Original post by Reality Check)
When it says 'excluding the use of references', what it means is that the words which spell out the reference don't contribute to the word count. Taking an inline citation (and presuming that your regulations exempt in-line citations from the word count too) as an example, were you to write: "It's not that complicated, and 'counting words is really easy' (Muddled et al, 2018)", the word count would be ten, because 'Muddled et al, 2018' are part of the reference. Similarly, the full reference for Muddled, found at the end in the References section, would also not be included in the word count.

Words in tables don't contribute to the word count. However, usually where there is excessive use of text contained in tables, it usually does count. This is to prevent students attempting to subvert the word count regulations by 'smuggling' text in.

Remember that someone has to read all of this, so be frugal with your work count. Brevity and concision are virtues.


You could argue that the word count is actually eleven, because "it's" is a contraction of 'it is'. But we'll stick to the above for now.
Cheers for that.
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10yearslate
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(Original post by Anagogic)
In the marking rubric it states that the word count is 2000 words, excluding the use of references and tables.

Does that mean that paraphrasing does not affect the word the count?
you count paraphrasing and quotes, but not the in text citations or bibliography.
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