3mmz
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Can anyone recommend a good text book for Criminal and Land Law because I am not a fan of the ones we have been recommended.
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mgi
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(Original post by 3mmz)
Can anyone recommend a good text book for Criminal and Land Law because I am not a fan of the ones we have been recommended.
Which ones have been recommended?
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IpsaLoquitur
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Smith and Hogans on criminal law is my favourite, and very up to date.
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3mmz
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(Original post by mgi)
Which ones have been recommended?
For land law my uni uses this one for the reading - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Textbook-La...1424739&sr=8-3
I can't really get into it though and Land Law is so hard.

Criminal law - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Criminal-La...s%2C145&sr=8-1
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Reality Check
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(Original post by 3mmz)
Can anyone recommend a good text book for Criminal and Land Law because I am not a fan of the ones we have been recommended.
Text books are a complete waste of time. You should be reading the cases. And read dissenting judgements - they're a very improving thing.
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3mmz
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Text books are a complete waste of time. You should be reading the cases. And read dissenting judgements - they're a very improving thing.
But for something like land law you need to understand it and there are not that many cases
Aso criminal law you need to understand Mens Rea for example -

So how do you revise then? Just reading cases?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by 3mmz)
But for something like land law you need to understand it and there are not that many cases
Your thread title talks about Criminal Law. Not Land Law

Aso criminal law you need to understand Mens Rea for example -
That's what lectures and tutorials are for.

So how do you revise then? Just reading cases?
You don't 'revise' by reading cases. You learn the law by reading them. You are talking about undergraduate level study aren't you, not A level?
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3mmz
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Your thread title talks about Criminal Law. Not Land Law



That's what lectures and tutorials are for.



You don't 'revise' by reading cases. You learn the law by reading them. You are talking about undergraduate level study aren't you, not A level?
Criminal and land law, I didn't want to create two threads on book suggestions.

Yes I am talking about undergraduate.
So you don't do any law text book reading or making notes?
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Reality Check
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(Original post by 3mmz)
Criminal and land law, I didn't want to create two threads on book suggestions.

Yes I am talking about undergraduate.
So you don't do any law text book reading or making notes?
Everyone has their own styles and recommendations, so I'm only talking from my point of view. It was drilled into us that reading textbooks was a complete waste of time. You have so much to read as a law student that you can't possibly read everything, so you need to be very selective. Text books might be useful to just skim to get a very broad overview of something, but the majority of your time should be spent reading the cases, thinking about them and how they fit in with others that you've read. Reading law journals is also a very good way to spend some time. This advice obviously depends on the subject: some areas are much more statute heavy, and thus require less time reading case law. Casebooks can be useful, but more often end up being a substitute for reading the actual cases.

J Papi - what's your view on this?
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Catherine1973
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We are told that the essential reading is the text books we have been told to buy (herring for criminal) as well as some specific cases each week and articles. Land law we have 2 books plus I also got sweet and max well as they said it was simpler to get used to the concepts. I tend to read all 3 on the relevant chapter.
But your university should guide you on what to read and should have a core textbook they expect you to read.
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3mmz
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Everyone has their own styles and recommendations, so I'm only talking from my point of view. It was drilled into us that reading textbooks was a complete waste of time. You have so much to read as a law student that you can't possibly read everything, so you need to be very selective. Text books might be useful to just skim to get a very broad overview of something, but the majority of your time should be spent reading the cases, thinking about them and how they fit in with others that you've read. Reading law journals is also a very good way to spend some time. This advice obviously depends on the subject: some areas are much more statute heavy, and thus require less time reading case law. Casebooks can be useful, but more often end up being a substitute for reading the actual cases.

J Papi - what's your view on this?
Thanks for your advice! I take any advice I can get especially from students from elite universities who have some of the best lecturers in the country!

When you say reading the cases - you mean the actual judgements or like what happened?
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Audrey18
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(Original post by Reality Check)
Text books are a complete waste of time. You should be reading the cases. And read dissenting judgements - they're a very improving thing.
Textbook + cases for me.
(Original post by 3mmz)
But for something like land law you need to understand it and there are not that many cases
Aso criminal law you need to understand Mens Rea for example -

So how do you revise then? Just reading cases?
Agreed. Till today, nobody has been able to explain clearly on this forum on the structure of
- golden, mischief, literal rule + purposive approach
- strict liability questions
- answering exam questions in general

Simply posting 'IRAC' to thread starters who are here to seek help is not good enough. At the very least, explain the fundamentals to the TSs.
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