ariyanrecardo
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Hello I am gonna be honest I am not the smartest and my grades are just average.
I applied to uni last year and managed to get a few offers, I was undecided on what i want to do so I applied to 3 uni for civil engineering and 2 uni for economics. so before my Alevel I had already received two offer that I was interested in from my top choose uni.
Surrey offered me civil engineering
Brunel offered me Economics
so now my question is what should I choose, as I rejected brunel and kept surreys offer and decided to take a gap year. But during this year I have been questioning myself constantly and still haven't reached a definite answer. so any advice on what i should do, as upon many research I see that engineering is not good pay, but economics is a bit of a hit and miss situation, so can anyone give me some advice
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artful_lounger
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"engineering is not good pay" - according to whom?

It may be worth noting the "averages" for economics graduate salaries are heavily skewed by graduates from a handful of universities (Oxbridge and LSE, primarily) getting very well remunerated positions. Look at the graduate prospects of the courses offered by the universities you are applying to, not in general - that will provide a far clearer picture of things.

To revisit, engineering is not a discipline you go into in order to become filthy rich. As a sector it offers fairly stable, well paying work, provided you have appropriate work experience by the end of your degree. It is very unlikely, if you get a 2:1 and do some internships during your degree, that you will end up going hungry or want for financial security in the engineering sector. However, you also will probably not own your own yacht.

You might like to do some research into exactly what these salary scales mean - research has indicated that salaries over ~£40k per year (outside London) don't actually lead to an overall increase in self reported happiness or wellbeing by those surveyed. If you think earning £30-40k per year is being "poor" then I recommend you take a gap year where you are earning minimum wage and not living with your parents, which may help you contextualise exactly how much money that is.

Additionally you should be aware that graduates with an engineering degree are able to apply to any job a graduate of an economics degree can, and then many more, with the sole exception of a very small number of roles in the civil service which are focused on economic analysis and policy.

Obviously though, if you can't stand the thought of doing physics-related work for the next 2-3 years (much less the rest of your career), then engineering would be a poor option to choose. Likewise if you can't bear doing maths ever again then you shouldn't do either economics or engineering.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 4 weeks ago
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ariyanrecardo
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
"engineering is not good pay" - according to whom?

It may be worth noting the "averages" for economics graduate salaries are heavily skewed by graduates from a handful of universities (Oxbridge and LSE, primarily) getting very well remunerated positions. Look at the graduate prospects of the courses offered by the universities you are applying to, not in general - that will provide a far clearer picture of things.

To revisit, engineering is not a discipline you go into in order to become filthy rich. As a sector it offers fairly stable, well paying work, provided you have appropriate work experience by the end of your degree. It is very unlikely, if you get a 2:1 and do some internships during your degree, that you will end up going hungry or want for financial security in the engineering sector. However, you also will probably not own your own yacht.

You might like to do some research into exactly what these salary scales mean - research has indicated that salaries over ~£40k per year (outside London) don't actually lead to an overall increase in self reported happiness or wellbeing by those surveyed. If you think earning £30-40k per year is being "poor" then I recommend you take a gap year where you are earning minimum wage and not living with your parents, which may help you contextualise exactly how much money that is.

Additionally you should be aware that graduates with an engineering degree are able to apply to any job a graduate of an economics degree can, and then many more, with the sole exception of a very small number of roles in the civil service which are focused on economic analysis and policy.

Obviously though, if you can't stand the thought of doing physics-related work for the next 2-3 years (much less the rest of your career), then engineering would be a poor option to choose. Likewise if you can't bear doing maths ever again then you shouldn't do either economics or engineering.
Hello mate much appreciate your advice, it has really opened my mind up. But would also like to know what sector of engineering has a greater job opportunities cause Surrey has told me I am able to do any engineering I like
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ariyanrecardo)
Hello mate much appreciate your advice, it has really opened my mind up. But would also like to know what sector of engineering has a greater job opportunities cause Surrey has told me I am able to do any engineering I like
Well, my knowledge is probably a few years out of date at this point - Smack might be able to offer some more relevant/current advice.

However when I was looking, my general impression was electronic/electrical broadly had a lot of opportunities and fewer people applying for those (and hence, commanded higher salaries). Materials was usually the smallest range - it's a fairly niche area, although there is a lot of academic research in materials or related areas. Process or control engineers seemed fairly in demand as well (across a range of areas e.g. aerospace, energy, food/agro).
Last edited by artful_lounger; 4 weeks ago
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ariyanrecardo
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Well, my knowledge is probably a few years out of date at this point - Smack might be able to offer some more relevant/current advice.

However when I was looking, my general impression was electronic/electrical broadly had a lot of opportunities and fewer people applying for those (and hence, commanded higher salaries). Materials was usually the smallest range - it's a fairly niche area, although there is a lot of academic research in materials or related areas. Process or control engineers seemed fairly in demand as well (across a range of areas e.g. aerospace, energy, food/agro).
Thank you very much for all the advice
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