HPV vaccine? Watch

katejones55
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Has anyone had the HPV vaccine? As far as I'm aware, the age at when you can start going for smear tests is 25, right? If you have sex before you are 25, can you still wait until you are over 25 to have a test or should you start going?
I'm 19 and haven't had sex yet so I've been thinking about getting the vaccine but I don't know if it is worth it because I think that you have to pay for it at the moment? Does anyone know if it is going to be on the NHS anytime soon? After having the vaccine, do you still have to have smear tests?
Also I heard something about the vaccine being against a form of the HPV virus that is more prevalent in white people, is this true?
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Reverie.
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You do still have to have smear tests as it only protects against certain strains of HPV (16 and 18).

Not sure about the other questions, sorry; I'd like to know about the NHS thing too.
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lazza
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there's no harm in having it. at least you'll be reassured when you start having sex
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galladriel
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You need to start having smear tests once a year from the time you become sexualy active. A pap test can detect many things and not just HPV. There are two vaccines right now -one protects from strains 16 and 18 and the other one from the aforementioned two, plus two more which I cannot remember right now.

The best age to get vaccinated for HPV is around 12, before you get involved in any kind of sexual contact -HPV may be caught via simple touch.

The older you get, the more chances you've got to already been inffected by at least one strain of HPV. 80% of women will have at least one type of the virus at least once in their lives. But don't worry, the immune system is most likely to fight the virus and never know you had it.

Even if you do get vaccinated NEVER FORGET the Pap test once a year. It may save your life.
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AmberB
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I've had the vaccine so I'll try and shed a bit of light on it
Generally, you don't need to go for smear tests until you're 25, even if you're sexually active. But some doctors may request you to go for one at a younger age (possibly 21) just to be on the safe side, or at your own request.
I think that the vaccine is definately worth it and is much more effective if you have it before you start having sex, even if it does mean going private to get it- it reduces the risk of getting cervical cancer by 75% as it prevents the female from contracting the HPV virus. However, this is only one way of getting cervical cancer, so it won't protect you against the other causes. But to put it in perspective- the main cause of cervical cancer is through the HPV virus. So all in all- I think it's worth it.
I think, at the moment, it's only available on the NHS for young girls (ages 9-12 or something like that), I can't really say when it will be available for everyone, but I think it will be introduced in the next couple of years from what my GP has told me.
You do still have to have smear tests even after having the vaccine because, as said earlier- HPV virus is only one of the causes.
As for the last question, I'm not actually sure but I don't see how it would be true.. :confused:
Anyway, hope this helps and answers some of your questions
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graemematt
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The vaccination strategy hasn't even been completely completed yet. Right now of course it would be wise to get vaccinated at a young age if youre female (and, if i'm honest, if you're male too...be considerate:p:). It's remarkably easy to acquire HPV and many sexually active women carry it asymptomatically. Remember that not only does HPV cause cervical cancer but also genital warts, so neither of these conditions are desirable!

Also, consider that some women are infected with more than one subtype of the virus (both high-risk and low-risk for cervical cancer) and that men can also carry it, and you should really consider vaccination as early as possible really. It's quite alarming of course to consider being vaccinated for a sexually transmitted infection at a young age but it really is necessary. Getting HPV 16/18 could have disastrous consequences
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galladriel
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(Original post by AmberB)
I've had the vaccine so I'll try and shed a bit of light on it
Generally, you don't need to go for smear tests until you're 25, even if you're sexually active. But some doctors may request you to go for one at a younger age (possibly 21) just to be on the safe side, or at your own request.
I think that the vaccine is definately worth it and is much more effective if you have it before you start having sex, even if it does mean going private to get it- it reduces the risk of getting cervical cancer by 75% as it prevents the female from contracting the HPV virus. However, this is only one way of getting cervical cancer, so it won't protect you against the other causes. But to put it in perspective- the main cause of cervical cancer is through the HPV virus. So all in all- I think it's worth it.
I think, at the moment, it's only available on the NHS for young girls (ages 9-12 or something like that), I can't really say when it will be available for everyone, but I think it will be introduced in the next couple of years from what my GP has told me.
You do still have to have smear tests even after having the vaccine because, as said earlier- HPV virus is only one of the causes.
As for the last question, I'm not actually sure but I don't see how it would be true.. :confused:
Anyway, hope this helps and answers some of your questions
Actually, HPV is identified to be the one and only cause of cervical cancer. So cervical cancer is the only cancer which can be prevented right now. The 75% you mentioned is for types 16 and 18 of the virus which is why they are called the high risk strains. However a further 25% may be caused by other strains of the virus not covered by the vaccine. That is why you need to keep taking pap test even if vaccinated.
Even if anomalies are traced in the cervical cells it will take years for them to turn into cancer so if you get tested regulary there is nothing to fear!
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AmberB
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^^^ Ah yes sorry, my mistake. I got confused as to whether it protected against all the HPV types or just a couple of them. But yeah that's right:p:
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katejones55
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Thank you all for the information, it's very helpful!

(Original post by AmberB)
I've had the vaccine so I'll try and shed a bit of light on it
Generally, you don't need to go for smear tests until you're 25, even if you're sexually active. But some doctors may request you to go for one at a younger age (possibly 21) just to be on the safe side, or at your own request.
I think that the vaccine is definately worth it and is much more effective if you have it before you start having sex, even if it does mean going private to get it- it reduces the risk of getting cervical cancer by 75% as it prevents the female from contracting the HPV virus. However, this is only one way of getting cervical cancer, so it won't protect you against the other causes. But to put it in perspective- the main cause of cervical cancer is through the HPV virus. So all in all- I think it's worth it.
I think, at the moment, it's only available on the NHS for young girls (ages 9-12 or something like that), I can't really say when it will be available for everyone, but I think it will be introduced in the next couple of years from what my GP has told me.
You do still have to have smear tests even after having the vaccine because, as said earlier- HPV virus is only one of the causes.
As for the last question, I'm not actually sure but I don't see how it would be true.. :confused:
Anyway, hope this helps and answers some of your questions
Did you have to pay for it then? If so, how much did it cost you?
Oh, I don't see how my last question could be true either but I could swear that I've read that somewhere... best ask my GP about it, anyway.
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AmberB
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Yeah, I think I payed about £400 for it. Which is a lot of money but I think it's worth it if you look into the long-term aspects. You get a course of 3 vaccines over a period of 6 months and can pay in installments.
It's definately worth asking your doctor about any queries you might have and will probably give you some leaflets and other information on it to make it easier to decide. And whether you'd be happy to pay for it.
I've just read on my GP's hospital website that the government have no plans to make it available to people over the age of 16 on the NHS unfortunately ... so that's something to take into account.
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katejones55
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(Original post by AmberB)
Yeah, I think I payed about £400 for it. Which is a lot of money but I think it's worth it if you look into the long-term aspects. You get a course of 3 vaccines over a period of 6 months and can pay in installments.
It's definately worth asking your doctor about any queries you might have and will probably give you some leaflets and other information on it to make it easier to decide. And whether you'd be happy to pay for it.
I've just read on my GP's hospital website that the government have no plans to make it available to people over the age of 16 on the NHS unfortunately ... so that's something to take into account.
That's not too bad a price, I guess. That's typical of the government as well. :rolleyes:
Thanks for all your help, anyway!
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AmberB
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^^^ Haha yeah.
I think the price isn't too bad either, especially seeing as it could save your life in the future. That was what helped me make my decision.
No worries, glad to be of some help
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Sophie2009
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I've had all three of mine and it's definately worth it. My first one hurt when the vaccine went in but the last two were fine. I got the meningitis and flu jabs too. I don't think the hpv vaccine was as bad as when I got my tb jab but I think it's good to get all your vaccinations.
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Polly1101
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(Original post by galladriel)
You need to start having smear tests once a year from the time you become sexualy active. A pap test can detect many things and not just HPV. There are two vaccines right now -one protects from strains 16 and 18 and the other one from the aforementioned two, plus two more which I cannot remember right now.

The best age to get vaccinated for HPV is around 12, before you get involved in any kind of sexual contact -HPV may be caught via simple touch.

The older you get, the more chances you've got to already been inffected by at least one strain of HPV. 80% of women will have at least one type of the virus at least once in their lives. But don't worry, the immune system is most likely to fight the virus and never know you had it.

Even if you do get vaccinated NEVER FORGET the Pap test once a year. It may save your life.
incorrect in my area of the nhs, iv been sexually active for a little over three years and i havent been asked to come in for a smear (GP knows how long iv been having sex due to me going on the pill).
My friend asked their doctor if she could have one and they basically laughed in her face saying they dont do them untill you're 25. As far as i know this is the norm unless the doctors have a reason to worry that you may be more susceptible to cervical cancer- ie family memeber just been diagnosed.
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