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I’m currently at university studying law (top 10 in the uk for both degree and university) but I’ve just got an overriding feeling that I’m in the wrong place, for a number of reasons that I’d rather not go into my social life hasn’t really got off the ground, I’ve got some acquaintances but we aren’t close. I’m enjoying aspects of the course - it’s definitely what I want to do. My flat mates are ok we’re not close like a lot but get along well enough. Homesickness has definitely been a problem, exacerbated by the lack of any social life. I just feel like I’m not getting anything like the “uni experience”.

Before coming to university I had a bit of a panic that I’d made the wrong choice and should of chosen my insurance UEA, which is abit closer to home and felt like a much better fit for me. I didn’t choose it because it’s not as prestigious a university. Right now I’m seriously considering transferring and have a few questions:

1) what’s transferring into second year like? For a law student and in general, what impact does it have on social life etc. Joining societies, and housing?

2) would it be better to just restart from year 1 next year, the only issue is that I took a year out so would be starting next year at age 20 - what impact would this have? Does anyone have any experience of this?

3) with regards to law what impact does transferring have on career prospects, I’d like to practice in a London firm and get a training contract after uni, but would the fact I transferred into second year or was graduating 2 years later than some people my age prevent this?

Cheers for reading- any advice would be really appreciated.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I’m currently at university studying law (top 10 in the uk for both degree and university) but I’ve just got an overriding feeling that I’m in the wrong place, for a number of reasons that I’d rather not go into my social life hasn’t really got off the ground, I’ve got some acquaintances but we aren’t close. I’m enjoying aspects of the course - it’s definitely what I want to do. My flat mates are ok we’re not close like a lot but get along well enough. Homesickness has definitely been a problem, exacerbated by the lack of any social life. I just feel like I’m not getting anything like the “uni experience”.

Before coming to university I had a bit of a panic that I’d made the wrong choice and should of chosen my insurance UEA, which is abit closer to home and felt like a much better fit for me. I didn’t choose it because it’s not as prestigious a university. Right now I’m seriously considering transferring and have a few questions:

1) what’s transferring into second year like? For a law student and in general, what impact does it have on social life etc. Joining societies, and housing?

2) would it be better to just restart from year 1 next year, the only issue is that I took a year out so would be starting next year at age 20 - what impact would this have? Does anyone have any experience of this?

3) with regards to law what impact does transferring have on career prospects, I’d like to practice in a London firm and get a training contract after uni, but would the fact I transferred into second year or was graduating 2 years later than some people my age prevent this?

Cheers for reading- any advice would be really appreciated.
Prestige of a uni isn't everything, it is also vitally important to attend a uni you are happy at. Your first step should be to email Admissions at UEA (or phone them) and talk to them about the possibility of transferring. They may say that transfer into Year 2 is impossible anyway and ask you to apply for Year 1, but that is something you need to check with them about. In some ways, it might be better to join in Year 1 anyway, as it will be easier socially to join at the same time as everyone else. I don't think your age will be an issue at all, 20 is still young enough to mix with the predominantly 18/19 year old Freshers and it won't matter for Student Finance or career prospects. However, you would be running up extra debt, so that is something to take into account.

I suggest you give UEA a call and let us know what they say so we can take it from there
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J.12
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Prestige of a uni isn't everything, it is also vitally important to attend a uni you are happy at. Your first step should be to email Admissions at UEA (or phone them) and talk to them about the possibility of transferring. They may say that transfer into Year 2 is impossible anyway and ask you to apply for Year 1, but that is something you need to check with them about. In some ways, it might be better to join in Year 1 anyway, as it will be easier socially to join at the same time as everyone else. I don't think your age will be an issue at all, 20 is still young enough to mix with the predominantly 18/19 year old Freshers and it won't matter for Student Finance or career prospects. However, you would be running up extra debt, so that is something to take into account.

I suggest you give UEA a call and let us know what they say so we can take it from there
Thanks for the reply!

I’ve got a meeting next week with my personal tutor to asses options. To be honest the social implications aren’t to big of a worry for me - this is the first time I’ve ever struggled to make friends, and playing sports (which I’d want to do at UEA) should mean that the age thing isn’t a issue at all (might even be a benefit).

The only major worries I have are financial implications of dropping out // transferring; the loss of ‘uni experience’ by transferring; and also being a failure in the eyes of friends and family, dropping out of a good uni to go to a ‘lesser one’ after already having a gap year.
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J Papi
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You definitely need to start again in first year. As a second year, you'll be missing Freshers and may have lost the chance to bond with other law students that you may have gotten on amazingly if you met them early in first year.

It's not that uncommon for people to start another law course at another uni in Y2 - I have several instances of this happening on my Linkedin. All but one of them (last time I checked) had TCs or vac schemes under their belt. The one thing that is to be said is that you may wish to consider sitting your first year exams - it's good practice and a chance to get some decent grades under your belt early on.

UEA's ****e for law, and I definitely wouldn't go there for either academia or careers support, but each to their own

Chances are that you're going to have to pay at least some of the tuition for this year. There's a 'Ask the SFE' forum on this website where you can ask for more details.

We obviously can't advise you as to the reaction of your friends and family.
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J.12
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(Original post by J Papi)
You definitely need to start again in first year. As a second year, you'll be missing Freshers and may have lost the chance to bond with other law students that you may have gotten on amazingly if you met them early in first year.

It's not that uncommon for people to start another law course at another uni in Y2 - I have several instances of this happening on my Linkedin. All but one of them (last time I checked) had TCs or vac schemes under their belt. The one thing that is to be said is that you may wish to consider sitting your first year exams - it's good practice and a chance to get some decent grades under your belt early on.

UEA's ****e for law, and I definitely wouldn't go there for either academia or careers support, but each to their own

Chances are that you're going to have to pay at least some of the tuition for this year. There's a 'Ask the SFE' forum on this website where you can ask for more details.

We obviously can't advise you as to the reaction of your friends and family.
Thanks for the advice, just wondering what you mean by UEA not being any good for law? Or in general? I’m pretty sure it’s LLB is ranked higher than my current UNI’s, and the careers support from what I remember is pretty outstanding. Obviously student satisfaction will differ between people, some people would love being in a big city others like me would rather be on a more rural campus near a small city.

If I was to drop out I was considering doing some work/work experience just so on my CV it’s not a wasted 7 months or so. Any idea how I could go about doing this?

Cheers.
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Euphoria101
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(Original post by J.12)
Thanks for the advice, just wondering what you mean by UEA not being any good for law? Or in general? I’m pretty sure it’s LLB is ranked higher than my current UNI’s, and the careers support from what I remember is pretty outstanding. Obviously student satisfaction will differ between people, some people would love being in a big city others like me would rather be on a more rural campus near a small city.

If I was to drop out I was considering doing some work/work experience just so on my CV it’s not a wasted 7 months or so. Any idea how I could go about doing this?

Cheers.
Would you mind sharing your current university?
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J.12
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(Original post by dyingstudent101)
Would you mind sharing your current university?
Newcastle, it’s not much further from home than UEA, but the ‘feel’ at UEA was much nicer.
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Euphoria101
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(Original post by J.12)
Newcastle, it’s not much further from home than UEA, but the ‘feel’ at UEA was much nicer.
Honestly if you feel better at UEA, go for it
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J.12
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(Original post by dyingstudent101)
Honestly if you feel better at UEA, go for it
That’s what I’m thinking, but it’s just all the implications: embarrassment, worsened career prospects, disappointing parents, costs, starting at 20 cause I had a gap year, feeling of failure And social implications aswell.
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J Papi
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(Original post by J.12)
Thanks for the advice, just wondering what you mean by UEA not being any good for law? Or in general? I’m pretty sure it’s LLB is ranked higher than my current UNI’s, and the careers support from what I remember is pretty outstanding. Obviously student satisfaction will differ between people, some people would love being in a big city others like me would rather be on a more rural campus near a small city.

If I was to drop out I was considering doing some work/work experience just so on my CV it’s not a wasted 7 months or so. Any idea how I could go about doing this?

Cheers.
League tables = crap, to the point where I struggle to find a single metric on them that is good at measuring what it claims to measure

Student satisfaction is an iffy topic because the differences between universities, in absolute terms, don't tend to be that large. There's a document in this thread https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6160930 that proves as much (it's document #9 - Student Satisfaction). Factor in the wild variations in response rates and you really do have a cluster**** of a metric on your hands

Contacts, cold emailing, or just apply for a job at the local supermarket/pub/charity shop if you can get one
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J.12
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(Original post by J Papi)
League tables = crap, to the point where I struggle to find a single metric on them that is good at measuring what it claims to measure

Student satisfaction is an iffy topic because the differences between universities, in absolute terms, don't tend to be that large. There's a document in this thread https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6160930 that proves as much (it's document #9 - Student Satisfaction). Factor in the wild variations in response rates and you really do have a cluster**** of a metric on your hands

Contacts, cold emailing, or just apply for a job at the local supermarket/pub/charity shop if you can get one
Ah ok thanks. Just out of curiosity you mentioned earlier that you had a number of people come across your linkedin who’d dropped out // done two first years etc. Do you work in the legal sector? And if so could you shed some more light on the career implications of what I’m considering.
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J Papi
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(Original post by J.12)
Ah ok thanks. Just out of curiosity you mentioned earlier that you had a number of people come across your linkedin who’d dropped out // done two first years etc. Do you work in the legal sector? And if so could you shed some more light on the career implications of what I’m considering.
Will be working - PM me for more

There are no career implications to what you're considering. You could choose to complete the year if you can afford it + are sure that you'll do decently, in order to add a decent set of grades to your CV. You should use this year to build up your CV academically, whether it is by going to Newcastle (or other) career events, getting full-time work experience, researching the legal profession and figuring out which part of it you're interested in, etc.
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J.12
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So I got a reply from UEA today:

I'm afraid it is too late for us to consider an application for 2019 entry.

You have the following options for 2020 entry

· Continue studying at Newcastle and complete your first year. We may be able to then consider you for Year 2 entry in 2020 however this would be dependent on the modules you have studied (to ensure they align with our course) and the grades you have achieved
· You can choose not to complete your year at Newcastle. We will then consider an application for year 1 and would require as part of your personal statement some further information as to why you chose not to complete your studies at your original institution

If you wish to apply to UEA for 2020 entry, you will need to make a new application via UCAS. If you choose to continue studying at Newcastle we will take your grades achieved into account as to whether we will be able to accept you to UEA (for either Year 1 or Year 2 entry). It is common for students to take a gap year before starting their studies and our course also includes a proportion of mature students.

Also spoke to my tutor yesterday about all this, they’ve recommended student counselling. Obviously they can’t tell me to stay or go, however they did say that dropping out // transferring wouldn’t have any impact on career, other than the fact that it might be brought up in an interview (also gave example of people who’d done similar things to what I’m considering and got on fine, if not well. That’s definitely they way I’m leaning at the moment but need to talk to parents about it obviously and the financial and social concerns are still a worry. But I just can’t get the idea that I’d be far far happier at UEA.
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Kali.kb
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(Original post by J.12)
So I got a reply from UEA today:

I'm afraid it is too late for us to consider an application for 2019 entry.

You have the following options for 2020 entry

· Continue studying at Newcastle and complete your first year. We may be able to then consider you for Year 2 entry in 2020 however this would be dependent on the modules you have studied (to ensure they align with our course) and the grades you have achieved
· You can choose not to complete your year at Newcastle. We will then consider an application for year 1 and would require as part of your personal statement some further information as to why you chose not to complete your studies at your original institution

If you wish to apply to UEA for 2020 entry, you will need to make a new application via UCAS. If you choose to continue studying at Newcastle we will take your grades achieved into account as to whether we will be able to accept you to UEA (for either Year 1 or Year 2 entry). It is common for students to take a gap year before starting their studies and our course also includes a proportion of mature students.

Also spoke to my tutor yesterday about all this, they’ve recommended student counselling. Obviously they can’t tell me to stay or go, however they did say that dropping out // transferring wouldn’t have any impact on career, other than the fact that it might be brought up in an interview (also gave example of people who’d done similar things to what I’m considering and got on fine, if not well. That’s definitely they way I’m leaning at the moment but need to talk to parents about it obviously and the financial and social concerns are still a worry. But I just can’t get the idea that I’d be far far happier at UEA.
I'm sorry that you've had trouble with how you feel in Newcastle, I'd say if you want to go to UEA then just go for it. It's better that you're happy at UEA and your happiness allowing you too feel motivated to get a 1st, than stick with Newcastle and stay unhappy and walk out with a 2:2
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harrysbar
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(Original post by J.12)
So I got a reply from UEA today:

I'm afraid it is too late for us to consider an application for 2019 entry.

You have the following options for 2020 entry

· Continue studying at Newcastle and complete your first year. We may be able to then consider you for Year 2 entry in 2020 however this would be dependent on the modules you have studied (to ensure they align with our course) and the grades you have achieved
· You can choose not to complete your year at Newcastle. We will then consider an application for year 1 and would require as part of your personal statement some further information as to why you chose not to complete your studies at your original institution

If you wish to apply to UEA for 2020 entry, you will need to make a new application via UCAS. If you choose to continue studying at Newcastle we will take your grades achieved into account as to whether we will be able to accept you to UEA (for either Year 1 or Year 2 entry). It is common for students to take a gap year before starting their studies and our course also includes a proportion of mature students.

Also spoke to my tutor yesterday about all this, they’ve recommended student counselling. Obviously they can’t tell me to stay or go, however they did say that dropping out // transferring wouldn’t have any impact on career, other than the fact that it might be brought up in an interview (also gave example of people who’d done similar things to what I’m considering and got on fine, if not well. That’s definitely they way I’m leaning at the moment but need to talk to parents about it obviously and the financial and social concerns are still a worry. But I just can’t get the idea that I’d be far far happier at UEA.
Yes talk it over with your parents, there's a lot to think about. I don't think student counselling will help tbh, but get the impression your tutor just suggested that because they wanted to be able to suggest something. But you hardly need counselling if it's just a case that you regret not going to your Insurance uni which is closer to home and seems like a better fit for you.

You can check online whether the first year modules are very similar at both unis - they may well be as they are both LLB courses. It might be better socially to start in Year 1 however, if you can afford to do so.

You'll still be eligible for full funding to begin another degree course, but I think you will have to repay student finance 25% of the year's tuition fees if you leave this term. There is also the issue of accommodation fees - your contract might well say you will have to pay the fees for the whole year even if you leave this term, unless Newcastle can find a replacement tenant. I would phone up the accommodation office about this asap so you know all the facts before the chat with your parents.
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J.12
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(Original post by harrysbar)
Yes talk it over with your parents, there's a lot to think about. I don't think student counselling will help tbh, but get the impression your tutor just suggested that because they wanted to be able to suggest something. But you hardly need counselling if it's just a case that you regret not going to your Insurance uni which is closer to home and seems like a better fit for you.

You can check online whether the first year modules are very similar at both unis - they may well be as they are both LLB courses. It might be better socially to start in Year 1 however, if you can afford to do so.

You'll still be eligible for full funding to begin another degree course, but I think you will have to repay student finance 25% of the year's tuition fees if you leave this term. There is also the issue of accommodation fees - your contract might well say you will have to pay the fees for the whole year even if you leave this term, unless Newcastle can find a replacement tenant. I would phone up the accommodation office about this asap so you know all the facts before the chat with your parents.
There’s other factors which I don’t want to mention on here that are leading to the decision aswell, so the counselling may well help - even if it does help me build up some confidence regarding being 20 in 1st yr etc.

I’ve looked at the modules and all match up bar one (we do land in first year UEA do it in second year) so maybe if possible it could be timetabled, but tbh I’d rather just drop out work and then start afresh next summer.

I’ve looked at my accommodation contract and I’m only liable to pay until the end of the term that I leave the uni, so if I stay till Christmas I’ll only have to pay 25% of fees + £1k for accommodation which considering isn’t too bad.

The worst thing is just talking to parents about it and all the stuff that goes along with dropping out, failure, embarrassment etc. And the worry of being 20 at uni.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by J.12)
There’s other factors which I don’t want to mention on here that are leading to the decision aswell, so the counselling may well help - even if it does help me build up some confidence regarding being 20 in 1st yr etc.

I’ve looked at the modules and all match up bar one (we do land in first year UEA do it in second year) so maybe if possible it could be timetabled, but tbh I’d rather just drop out work and then start afresh next summer.

I’ve looked at my accommodation contract and I’m only liable to pay until the end of the term that I leave the uni, so if I stay till Christmas I’ll only have to pay 25% of fees + £1k for accommodation which considering isn’t too bad.

The worst thing is just talking to parents about it and all the stuff that goes along with dropping out, failure, embarrassment etc. And the worry of being 20 at uni.
Being 20 at uni is not significant at all unless you make it so in your head. My son dropped out of one uni and started another aged 20 - no problem, he wasn't the only one in his halls who had either taken a gap year or dropped out of a previous uni. It's not unusual to start uni aged 20.

That's good about the accommodation contract, hope it goes well with talking to your parents. Maybe try and prepare them a bit in advance by letting them know you are not enjoying the uni experience and want to talk to them about it when you come home. The hardest thing is starting the conversation
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