username4998622
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Basically, I'm 15 ( I turn 16 next year) and I am currently an AS student. My career choice (currently) is medicine/biomedicine. I know that medical unis won't accept students who are under 18. I have no interest in taking a gap year because I think that's an utter waste of time for me. It costs too much money if i have to take a gap year. Is there a way to get into medical schools even if you are unde 18?
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Democracy
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(Original post by tyjang23)
Basically, I'm 15 ( I turn 16 next year) and I am currently an AS student. My career choice (currently) is medicine/biomedicine. I know that medical unis won't accept students who are under 18. I have no interest in taking a gap year because I think that's an utter waste of time for me. It costs too much money if i have to take a gap year. Is there a way to get into medical schools even if you are unde 18?
Literally the first result when I googled "medical school age requirements":

https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...-for-medicine/

As you can see, there are medical schools which accept 17 year olds, but you will need to check carefully.

Out of interest, why would a gap year cost money?
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999tigger
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Doogie Howser did it. Liking your reasoning on gap years.
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nexttime
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(Original post by tyjang23)
It costs too much money if i have to take a gap year.
?

People used to take a gap year so they could earn some money!
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username4998622
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(Original post by Democracy)
Literally the first result when I googled "medical school age requirements":

https://www.themedicportal.com/appli...-for-medicine/

As you can see, there are medical schools which accept 17 year olds, but you will need to check carefully.

Out of interest, why would a gap year cost money?
well, my friends told me that gap year cost more money than actually going to universities. It will take longer to actually get my degree so I would able to work in a hospital a year later. And then I have to do different programs during my gap year to fill up my time. Maybe they were wrong about it.

The reason why I asked this question is that one of my friends told me that if I take the Mensa exam (the IQ test thingy) and get a really high score (If I can), I MIGHT be able to enter even though I am younger than the actual age requirement. Is that true?
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A_J_B
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(Original post by tyjang23)
well, my friends told me that gap year cost more money than actually going to universities. It will take longer to actually get my degree so I would able to work in a hospital a year later. And then I have to do different programs during my gap year to fill up my time. Maybe they were wrong about it.

The reason why I asked this question is that one of my friends told me that if I take the Mensa exam (the IQ test thingy) and get a really high score (If I can), I MIGHT be able to enter even though I am younger than the actual age requirement. Is that true?
1 year is really nothing in the grand scheme of things.
When I applied last year, I was in the same situation as you (15when starting AS, 16 when giving interviews) . I applied to Nottingham, BSMS, Manchester, Liverpool.
Some med schools like Bristol are really strict about this as you do clinical placements from early on, and since you won't be 18 nobody can hold you responsible for breach of confidentiality, etc.....
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999tigger
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(Original post by tyjang23)
well, my friends told me that gap year cost more money than actually going to universities. It will take longer to actually get my degree so I would able to work in a hospital a year later. And then I have to do different programs during my gap year to fill up my time. Maybe they were wrong about it.

The reason why I asked this question is that one of my friends told me that if I take the Mensa exam (the IQ test thingy) and get a really high score (If I can), I MIGHT be able to enter even though I am younger than the actual age requirement. Is that true?
Your friends are impressive.. How old and experienced are your friends? Are they still at school?
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Tonic Water
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(Original post by tyjang23)
well, my friends told me that gap year cost more money than actually going to universities. It will take longer to actually get my degree so I would able to work in a hospital a year later. And then I have to do different programs during my gap year to fill up my time. Maybe they were wrong about it.

The reason why I asked this question is that one of my friends told me that if I take the Mensa exam (the IQ test thingy) and get a really high score (If I can), I MIGHT be able to enter even though I am younger than the actual age requirement. Is that true?
How would a gap year cost more money if you're living at home and working? Don't listen to what your friends say, use your common sense. A gap year is what you make of it.

Also, one year is nothing considering that you're only 15/16, will probably retire when you're 70 and could very well live a few more decades after that.
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Tonic Water
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Your friends are impressive.. How old and experienced are your friends? Are they still at school?
I don't think these friends will be getting into MENSA anytime soon.
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m00nl1ght
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I’m in the same boat as you as an international student. I won’t be 18 until December next year.
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m00nl1ght
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(Original post by A_J_B)
1 year is really nothing in the grand scheme of things.
When I applied last year, I was in the same situation as you (15when starting AS, 16 when giving interviews) . I applied to Nottingham, BSMS, Manchester, Liverpool.
Some med schools like Bristol are really strict about this as you do clinical placements from early on, and since you won't be 18 nobody can hold you responsible for breach of confidentiality, etc.....
Did you get into any of your choices despite being 16?
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Laurence863
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(Original post by tyjang23)
well, my friends told me that gap year cost more money than actually going to universities. It will take longer to actually get my degree so I would able to work in a hospital a year later. And then I have to do different programs during my gap year to fill up my time. Maybe they were wrong about it.

The reason why I asked this question is that one of my friends told me that if I take the Mensa exam (the IQ test thingy) and get a really high score (If I can), I MIGHT be able to enter even though I am younger than the actual age requirement. Is that true?
Come on man, you want to study medicine, you need to be sharper than this, your friends are having you on.

In your gap year, you should get a either full time or part time job with lots of hours, continue studies by picking up another subject or doing things like UKMT of UKCAT (whatever its called for medicine) and pick up an extra curricular, e.g volunteering for saint Johns on a weekend. Getting a decent hobby wouldn't be a bad idea either.

I don't think that the mensa exam has any relevance to medicine whatsoever, I have no idea why this would be the case but maybe I'm wrong.
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(Original post by tyjang23)
well, my friends told me that gap year cost more money than actually going to universities. It will take longer to actually get my degree so I would able to work in a hospital a year later. And then I have to do different programs during my gap year to fill up my time. Maybe they were wrong about it.

The reason why I asked this question is that one of my friends told me that if I take the Mensa exam (the IQ test thingy) and get a really high score (If I can), I MIGHT be able to enter even though I am younger than the actual age requirement. Is that true?
Don't see what MENSA would have to do with it. If they have age requirements, they have age requirements.

Why don't you try volunteering at a nursing home, or in a hospital, during your gap year. This will give you an indication of what working in a healthcare setting might entail. You could also join St John Ambulance to learn first aid.
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m00nl1ght
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I’m an international student & won’t be turning 18 until December next year but I’m applying for 2020 entry at Imperial, UCL, KCL & Manchester for medicine. Is there any hope or will I have to be placed as deferred entry if the universities accept me?
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Deggs_14
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How are you only 15/16 in year 12? I was 15/16 in year 11. Have you skipped a year?
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Tonic Water
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(Original post by m00nl1ght)
I’m an international student & won’t be turning 18 until December next year but I’m applying for 2020 entry at Imperial, UCL, KCL & Manchester for medicine. Is there any hope or will I have to be placed as deferred entry if the universities accept me?
Well what do they say their age requirements are?
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(Original post by tyjang23)
Basically, I'm 15 ( I turn 16 next year) and I am currently an AS student. My career choice (currently) is medicine/biomedicine. I know that medical unis won't accept students who are under 18. I have no interest in taking a gap year because I think that's an utter waste of time for me. It costs too much money if i have to take a gap year. Is there a way to get into medical schools even if you are unde 18?
Many medical schools do not accept you onto their programme until 18 for practical reasons. For instance at Oxford, as Democracy's link indicates, the clinical contact starts in the first term (GP surgery) therefore you have to have turned 18 by 1st November.
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nexttime
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(Original post by tyjang23)
well, my friends told me that gap year cost more money than actually going to universities. It will take longer to actually get my degree so I would able to work in a hospital a year later. And then I have to do different programs during my gap year to fill up my time. Maybe they were wrong about it.
Come on dude. You're trying to argue that you are mature enough to go to med school despite your age, and you post this ****. Think for yourself!

(Original post by Oxford Mum)
Many medical schools do not accept you onto their programme until 18 for practical reasons. For instance at Oxford, as Democracy's link indicates, the clinical contact starts in the first term (GP surgery) therefore you have to have turned 18 by 1st November.
Is that a practical reason? Or is that an arbitrarily decided, entirely random reason?

Its the indemnity insurance companies that decide 18 is the magic age, I believe. It annoys me that there are a bunch of men (no doubt) sitting in a plush office who said 'well, what shall be our mark of maturity. Will it be an intense and rigorous interview system and evidence of years of outstanding academic performance, combined with the responsibility of now taking on a lifelong profession? Or shall we make it that one day you aren't mature because your 17 and the next day you are mature because you're now 18? Hmm let us think...' :mad:
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(Original post by nexttime)
Come on dude. You're trying to argue that you are mature enough to go to med school despite your age, and you post this ****. Think for yourself!


Is that a practical reason? Or is that an arbitrarily decided, entirely random reason?

Its the indemnity insurance companies that decide 18 is the magic age, I believe. It annoys me that there are a bunch of men (no doubt) sitting in a plush office who said 'well, what shall be our mark of maturity. Will it be an intense and rigorous interview system and evidence of years of outstanding academic performance, combined with the responsibility of now taking on a lifelong profession? Or shall we make it that one day you aren't mature because your 17 and the next day you are mature because you're now 18? Hmm let us think...' :mad:
I don't know. It's Oxford's official statement. You are probably right.

We knew a first responder who offered to take my son along to observe, but the authorities refused until age 18, I think because he may have been upset at some of the things he could have seen. However just a few months later, that would have been ok.
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Democracy
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(Original post by tyjang23)
well, my friends told me that gap year cost more money than actually going to universities. It will take longer to actually get my degree so I would able to work in a hospital a year later. And then I have to do different programs during my gap year to fill up my time. Maybe they were wrong about it.

The reason why I asked this question is that one of my friends told me that if I take the Mensa exam (the IQ test thingy) and get a really high score (If I can), I MIGHT be able to enter even though I am younger than the actual age requirement. Is that true?
Does your friend think you're going to be taking one of those Instagram world tour type of gap years? Because you know that's not what a gap year has to be right?

University is £9250 per year and that's just the tuition fees - we haven't even got into living costs, travel, books, etc. You could use your gap year to do some part time or full time work (i.e. make some money). Even if you sat around at home all day in your pyjamas and spent your money on normal things you'd still not be spending anything close to what you would be if you moved out.

Ideally as a medical school applicant you should do something relevant on your gap year i.e. healthcare volunteering, medical shadowing etc. Once again, this doesn't have to be expensive.

The bit about Mensa: I properly guffawed at that. Say thanks to your friend for me :toofunny:
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