Career prospects for clinical pharmacy in the uk? Watch

HASSSSSSSSS
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#1
I'm only in year 12 and just thinking about going into clinical pharmacy. I've looked at other threads and I don't understand a lot of it so before I spend time on researching everything to do with being a pharmacist - can someone simply tell me if it is good idea to go to pharmacy school with the intent of becoming a clinical pharmacist. I've heard it pays less than community pharmacy but I don't care.
0
reply
grKiro
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 weeks ago
#2
If you have continuous interest on it, then go for it
0
reply
0895
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 weeks ago
#3
A pharmacist is a pharmacist is a pharmacist!
The 'clinical' pharmacist term comes from the Government and the mass media, using it to distinguish between pharmacists who work in community , e.g. in a shop and pharmacists who work in a GP surgery and the government keep referring to them as clinical pharmacists. You could argue that all pharmacists are clinical pharmacists as no matter where you study the same ciriculum is followed, just taught in different teaching methods in different Unis.
The reason the government uses the term 'clinical' is because a lot of pharmacists working in general practice in a surgery will have voluntarily done a 2 yr part-time Diploma. I did one called PG Dip MedsMan. which means post-graduate diploma in medicines management, if you look at uni websites with schools of pharmacy you can see what post-grad diplomas they offer, some will be like mine, some will focus on Community , so may include a module on managing staff, or a business module. Then there are hospital diplomas. It is usually considered to progress in hospital pharmacy up the bands and salary scale you need to do a diploma. But you would need to ask a hospital pharmacist . There is a thread on here a few months ago called I'm a newly qualified band 6 pharmacist in hospital and i love my job. https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5638748
So basically, a pharmacist is a pharmacist, but you MAY become more 'clinical' if you pursue post-grad courses like diplomas and IP courses. The Government is using it to try to help them, and the public identify a pharmacist in a branch like a Boots, and a pharmacist who works full-time for a GP surgery, doing things like medicines reviews, signing off repeats, reading hospital letters and sorting out what new drugs have been started and which have been stopped and if they have requested any follow-ups or monitoring, so in a way it is more clinical than community which is more labelling and dispensing scripts from GPs, nurses and dentists, etc. Talking to the public and advising on purchase of OTC medicines, and offering any extra services like flu jabs, or medicines reviews (being phased out and stopped in 2021 and moved to GP surgeries) or the NMS, new medicine service.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Bishop Grosseteste University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 15 Nov '19
  • University of Hertfordshire
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Sat, 16 Nov '19
  • University of Roehampton
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 16 Nov '19

Are you registered to vote?

18-20 years old (yes) (260)
54.28%
18-20 years old (no) (62)
12.94%
20-25 years old (yes) (80)
16.7%
20-25 years old (no) (9)
1.88%
25-30 years old (yes) (25)
5.22%
25-30 years old (no) (0)
0%
30-40 years old (yes) (24)
5.01%
30-40 years old (no) (3)
0.63%
40+ years old (yes) (9)
1.88%
40+ years old (no) (7)
1.46%

Watched Threads

View All