Diagnosed with Ibs with no tests done

Watch
Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Help my doctor told me I have ibs but no tests were conducted and the tablets given to me don’t seem to work
0
reply
Pathway
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Go back and ask for more to be done.
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by Anonymous)
Help my doctor told me I have ibs but no tests were conducted and the tablets given to me don’t seem to work
IBS is a clinical diagnosis. A blood test is usually recommended to exclude other diagnoses but there is no need for any other specialised tests unless they suspect there is an alternative cause to your symptoms.

If the medication doesn't work, go back to your doctor.

If you are in the mood for a long read, here is the NICE guidelines that your doctor should have followed: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg6...agnosis-of-ibs
Last edited by ecolier; 1 year ago
2
reply
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Anonymous)
Help my doctor told me I have ibs but no tests were conducted and the tablets given to me don’t seem to work
Hey. Sorry you're obviously having issues with your gut. As Ecolier has said there aren't any tests that can diagnose IBS so you wouldn't have needed testes for that. With a condition like that doctors will often do tests to rule out other things before diagnosis, but sometimes they will be confident that the symptoms don't have any other cause or that the conditions are similar enough that the treatment would be the same and that the specific diagnosis doesn't matter so much (especially if both potential options are hard to diagnose things with no specific test).

If you feel like they've made that call too early you could go back and ask for them to consider some other options. If you have any concerns or suspicions of your own mention them and they should be able to either test for them or explain why a test isn't needed.
With IBS like symptoms one of the main other options would be an intolerance or sensitivity to a certain food. That's something you can test a bit at home and then discuss with your GP once you have some more information. Even within IBS there is often some level of trigger for symptoms so this method can be useful either way. I'll explain briefly below, but there's loads of info on the internet and you can ask a pharmacist for some advice too.

Keep a diary of some sort with what you're eating, how much and when along with when you are getting symptoms (and what ones if yours tend to vary). Keep an eye out for any patterns. If it does look like there's some sort of pattern try to see what similar thing happens around those times. Does it tend to be in the morning? After a big meal? After hot food? After eating things with milk or onion or flour?

If there doesn't seem to be any pattern you can either chop it up to random IBS or you can go a bit deeper and try looking at and experimenting with the whole foundation of your diet. Do you tend to eat a lot? Do you tend to eat processed foods? Do you tend to move a lot after eating? Do you tend to have most of your food in one sitting?

Pick something about your diet (you can look online for info on what tends to cause problems and what is okay to change by yourself- some things are important to keep in or you should be careful about changing) and see if that helps. You could try changing to fresher foods that you make yourself. You could try spreading your food throughout the day. You could try eating a bit less in general. You could try avoiding or cutting down on something your diet is largely based on (like if you tend to have meals based on carbs or with a glass of milk etc). Maybe you couldn't find a patten before because it was something you always do/ eat.

Keep up with any changes you make for around a month to see if it does affect your symptoms. If it doesn't you can move on. If it does you can try undoing that change to see if the symptoms come back then go see your GP with that new information and discuss it. It might be that the thing you have issues with is related to a specific diagnosis or it might be that it's still under that bracket of IBS, but it keeps them up to date and they might have a bit of advice on managing it moving forwards.


I hope that all makes sense. With gut stuff it is quite common not to really know any specifics or that even if you do know a certain trigger it still doesn't change the diagnosis from IBS. Your bowel is still irritable, it's just that you know more about what irritates it.
If those tablets don't improve things do go back and see your GP again. There are a few different treatments that tend to help IBS and they will know to try another or to tweak this current one. Same thing if things start getting worse- go see GP again. This isn't just "you have IBS, go away". You can absolutely go back if you need to. And there's loads of info online too that can help you with some coping techniques and self management.
Good luck with everything.
2
reply
Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by ecolier)
IBS is a clinical diagnosis. A blood test is usually recommended to exclude other diagnoses but there is no need for any other specialised tests unless they suspect there is an alternative cause to your symptoms.

If the medication doesn't work, go back to your doctor.

If you are in the mood for a long read, here is the NICE guidelines that your doctor should have followed: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg6...agnosis-of-ibs
Thank you for your advice
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#6
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by Kindred)
Hey. Sorry you're obviously having issues with your gut. As Ecolier has said there aren't any tests that can diagnose IBS so you wouldn't have needed testes for that. With a condition like that doctors will often do tests to rule out other things before diagnosis, but sometimes they will be confident that the symptoms don't have any other cause or that the conditions are similar enough that the treatment would be the same and that the specific diagnosis doesn't matter so much (especially if both potential options are hard to diagnose things with no specific test).

If you feel like they've made that call too early you could go back and ask for them to consider some other options. If you have any concerns or suspicions of your own mention them and they should be able to either test for them or explain why a test isn't needed.
With IBS like symptoms one of the main other options would be an intolerance or sensitivity to a certain food. That's something you can test a bit at home and then discuss with your GP once you have some more information. Even within IBS there is often some level of trigger for symptoms so this method can be useful either way. I'll explain briefly below, but there's loads of info on the internet and you can ask a pharmacist for some advice too.

Keep a diary of some sort with what you're eating, how much and when along with when you are getting symptoms (and what ones if yours tend to vary). Keep an eye out for any patterns. If it does look like there's some sort of pattern try to see what similar thing happens around those times. Does it tend to be in the morning? After a big meal? After hot food? After eating things with milk or onion or flour?

If there doesn't seem to be any pattern you can either chop it up to random IBS or you can go a bit deeper and try looking at and experimenting with the whole foundation of your diet. Do you tend to eat a lot? Do you tend to eat processed foods? Do you tend to move a lot after eating? Do you tend to have most of your food in one sitting?

Pick something about your diet (you can look online for info on what tends to cause problems and what is okay to change by yourself- some things are important to keep in or you should be careful about changing) and see if that helps. You could try changing to fresher foods that you make yourself. You could try spreading your food throughout the day. You could try eating a bit less in general. You could try avoiding or cutting down on something your diet is largely based on (like if you tend to have meals based on carbs or with a glass of milk etc). Maybe you couldn't find a patten before because it was something you always do/ eat.

Keep up with any changes you make for around a month to see if it does affect your symptoms. If it doesn't you can move on. If it does you can try undoing that change to see if the symptoms come back then go see your GP with that new information and discuss it. It might be that the thing you have issues with is related to a specific diagnosis or it might be that it's still under that bracket of IBS, but it keeps them up to date and they might have a bit of advice on managing it moving forwards.


I hope that all makes sense. With gut stuff it is quite common not to really know any specifics or that even if you do know a certain trigger it still doesn't change the diagnosis from IBS. Your bowel is still irritable, it's just that you know more about what irritates it.
If those tablets don't improve things do go back and see your GP again. There are a few different treatments that tend to help IBS and they will know to try another or to tweak this current one. Same thing if things start getting worse- go see GP again. This isn't just "you have IBS, go away". You can absolutely go back if you need to. And there's loads of info online too that can help you with some coping techniques and self management.
Good luck with everything.
Thank you so much for your advice it’s been so informative I think I will try the elimination diet that you suggested however my doctor did tell me I should be able to eat normal everyday foods without getting any triggers or flare ups while I’m on tablets.My next appointment with the doctors is in a weeks time hopefully I can get More information on my diagnosis
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Anonymous)
Thank you so much for your advice it’s been so informative I think I will try the elimination diet that you suggested however my doctor did tell me I should be able to eat normal everyday foods without getting any triggers or flare ups while I’m on tablets.My next appointment with the doctors is in a weeks time hopefully I can get More information on my diagnosis
So not true - tablets may help to a degree but won't mean you don't get any symptoms at all! What tablets are you on? Mebeverine? Buscopan?
0
reply
Surnia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
A syndrome is a collection of symptoms that can't be attributed to a specific condition, so no, they can't test for IBS and, in the absence of anything else particular, that will be the diagnosis.

A lot of people suggest a FODMAP diet for IBS, which is eating foods low in a particular type of carbohydrate. It really needs specialist advice to make sure you are eating healthily. I looked at this, but I was ok eating the foods on the 'try to avoid' list and can't eat some on the 'good' list.

My GP suggested trying a food combining diet for my IBS, and it made a massive difference from being doubled up with pain and regularly dashing to the loo. He said to get the book 'The Harcombe Diet', ignore all the guff in the first half and go straight for the eating plan. You need to read up for the details, but basically, it's low salt, low sugar, avoid processed food and eat food groups together that are easy to digest, eg carbs and veg, protein and veg, and fruit before or between meals. After ten days I felt much better, and still stick to it closely now; I still have bad days, but overall my symptoms have never been as consistently bad as the early months.

PS. Re your GP, I don't know of any tablets that prevent the symptoms of IBS whilst eating 'normally', only ones that can relieve them if they flare up. Buscopan works for me, Colpermin doesn't. I did have tablets for acid reflux, which can be a result of IBS.
Last edited by Surnia; 1 year ago
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (18)
7.35%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (37)
15.1%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (44)
17.96%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (35)
14.29%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (64)
26.12%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (47)
19.18%

Watched Threads

View All