In-Tray exercise & Interview Questions for the role of Internal Exclusions Co-Coordin Watch

ci2
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Hi, I just had a email saying that I am chosen to have an interview to be the Internal Exclusions Co-Coordinator in my local secondary school. They have said that they will be doing a in-tray exercise and interview. Can someone please tell me what sort of scenarios that they will normally ask and what interview questions that they would normally ask also?
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by ci2)
Hi, I just had a email saying that I am chosen to have an interview to be the Internal Exclusions Co-Coordinator in my local secondary school. They have said that they will be doing a in-tray exercise and interview. Can someone please tell me what sort of scenarios that they will normally ask and what interview questions that they would normally ask also?
I've not heard of this job title before, it might help you to get some good answers if you explain a bit more about what the role would involve.

Nearly all school based jobs at interview will ask some kind of safeguarding question e.g. "What does safeguarding mean to you?" or "What would you do if a child made a disclosure to you?". If you'll be responsible for supervising kids, you might be asked a behaviour question too e.g. "John is doing X, which is not allowed in internal exclusion. What do you do?" or "How would you deal with a student showing extreme behaviour?"
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bwilliams
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The in-tray exercise is part of a leadership interview and involves you prioritising a set of scenarios.

My in-tray exercise was similar to this:

You arrive at school at 8:30am, headteacher has just phoned you to tell you she is off sick. You are standing in. These six things have landed on your desk. What do you do first and how do you deal with them?
1. Class teacher leaves note saying "I need to speak with your urgently about the safety of Joe."
2. A parent has sent an email requesting to speak to the head.
3. A teacher has asked for your help in a classroom.
4. A child is throwing up in the playground.
5. The visitor sign in machine is not working and the receptionist is new to the job.
6. A child is refusing to come to school, parent is in tears on the phone.

There is obviously some order of importance. However, you could argue that either one is more important depending on context. The most important part is justifying your decision making.
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