marvelgirl27
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I understand that this is a question that has been asked plenty of times before, however, my circumstances are quite different to those of others and I am interested to hear opinions. Although I won't be attending university for a while yet, this is something that I feel as if I have to plan and possibly start saving for depending on the advice given.

I would love to study at a Russell Group University, potentially acquiring a degree in English, Law or Psychology. Although, I am more inclined towards getting an English degree. Family members (who have recently passed) have provided me with a small sum of inheritance to be put towards the care of my dog and university - this family member was incredibly supportive of both. Since another family member's dementia diagnosis, the possibility of my dog being able to stay at home whilst I attend university has been quashed. The only option I have is to take her with me, or rehome her. And, rehoming her isn't an option. This is a dog who has helped me through the roughest of times, and I depend on her. Medical professionals and my counsellor have agreed that my dog has been (and continues to be) pivotal in helping me to cope with psychological issues. She and I are inseparable. She is also a competition dog, trained lightly in several sports and has competed at major events. Training her has helped, too.

I am not sure what to do? I would be more than willing to live outside of halls (which I understand will be a necessity, having a pet) and maybe renting a spare room in somebody's house. My main concern with that, though, is how other people may treat my dog and how much of a nuisance she might be to them? Although I think she is good, other people may not be appreciative of her behaviour (hyperactive). I did think about joining the tiny house movement, but I'm not sure whether that's an entirely fantastical idea. Does anybody have any suggestions? I would also be on a limited budget when looking for accomodation, however, high starting costs can be managed with inheritance.
Thank you.
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CoolCavy
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If you have a medical condition with medical proof that the dog is necessary then it will be accommodated, otherwise it will not and you will have to get it re homed. No landlord is going to want a hyperactive dog in their home and it seems fishy that she is apparently helping you with something yet is like that, usually service dogs are very placid and laid back.
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🦁Road to A** 🦁
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(Original post by marvelgirl27)
I understand that this is a question that has been asked plenty of times before, however, my circumstances are quite different to those of others and I am interested to hear opinions. Although I won't be attending university for a while yet, this is something that I feel as if I have to plan and possibly start saving for depending on the advice given.

I would love to study at a Russell Group University, potentially acquiring a degree in English, Law or Psychology. Although, I am more inclined towards getting an English degree. Family members (who have recently passed) have provided me with a small sum of inheritance to be put towards the care of my dog and university - this family member was incredibly supportive of both. Since another family member's dementia diagnosis, the possibility of my dog being able to stay at home whilst I attend university has been quashed. The only option I have is to take her with me, or rehome her. And, rehoming her isn't an option. This is a dog who has helped me through the roughest of times, and I depend on her. Medical professionals and my counsellor have agreed that my dog has been (and continues to be) pivotal in helping me to cope with psychological issues. She and I are inseparable. She is also a competition dog, trained lightly in several sports and has competed at major events. Training her has helped, too.

I am not sure what to do? I would be more than willing to live outside of halls (which I understand will be a necessity, having a pet) and maybe renting a spare room in somebody's house. My main concern with that, though, is how other people may treat my dog and how much of a nuisance she might be to them? Although I think she is good, other people may not be appreciative of her behaviour (hyperactive). I did think about joining the tiny house movement, but I'm not sure whether that's an entirely fantastical idea. Does anybody have any suggestions? I would also be on a limited budget when looking for accomodation, however, high starting costs can be managed with inheritance.
Thank you.
Cats just get yourself a cat
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StriderHort
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
No landlord is going to want a hyperactive dog in their home.
I dunno tbh, over the years i've seen landlords split down roughly the middle on pets. Plenty do say no, along with no smoking, poor people ect...but plenty also don't seem to care, you've paid a deposit and signed a contract making you responsible for cleaning and damages and they're happy with that. (my block allows pets no problems)

Mind you, I did have friends that moved to nice bit of London and got told it was £1000 deposit for each cat......although that was unsurprisingly basically a scam.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by marvelgirl27)
I understand that this is a question that has been asked plenty of times before, however, my circumstances are quite different to those of others and I am interested to hear opinions. Although I won't be attending university for a while yet, this is something that I feel as if I have to plan and possibly start saving for depending on the advice given.

I would love to study at a Russell Group University, potentially acquiring a degree in English, Law or Psychology. Although, I am more inclined towards getting an English degree. Family members (who have recently passed) have provided me with a small sum of inheritance to be put towards the care of my dog and university - this family member was incredibly supportive of both. Since another family member's dementia diagnosis, the possibility of my dog being able to stay at home whilst I attend university has been quashed. The only option I have is to take her with me, or rehome her. And, rehoming her isn't an option. This is a dog who has helped me through the roughest of times, and I depend on her. Medical professionals and my counsellor have agreed that my dog has been (and continues to be) pivotal in helping me to cope with psychological issues. She and I are inseparable. She is also a competition dog, trained lightly in several sports and has competed at major events. Training her has helped, too.

I am not sure what to do? I would be more than willing to live outside of halls (which I understand will be a necessity, having a pet) and maybe renting a spare room in somebody's house. My main concern with that, though, is how other people may treat my dog and how much of a nuisance she might be to them? Although I think she is good, other people may not be appreciative of her behaviour (hyperactive). I did think about joining the tiny house movement, but I'm not sure whether that's an entirely fantastical idea. Does anybody have any suggestions? I would also be on a limited budget when looking for accomodation, however, high starting costs can be managed with inheritance.
Thank you.
This isn't going to happen, if I'm going to be blunt about it. The chances of your finding a landlord who will let to a student with a pet are vanishingly small. In fact, I've never heard of it. As for being a lodger, it is again very unlikely to be able to find someone willing to take you on and, with a hyperactive dog, the chances are even smaller.

However, this isn't the important point. What will the dog do when you go into lectures, even for short periods? You can't take the dog with you, and you've already said s/he's both hyperactive and you're both inseparable. How do you think she'd behave in a strange house with you disappearing for hours at a time?! It's simply not fair on you and, more importantly, not fair on the dog.

Unless you can find someone else to look after your dog during term time, I think you're going to have to make a tough decision.
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ReadingMum
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As a parent and a dog lover this is not going to work. Going away to university with underlying psychological issues means that you would need the support system around you - not being alone in a room with your dog. It would be a rare landlord that would take on a lodger with a hyper dog - what is it going to do all day when you are in lectures? Uni should also be about more than just studying - you should be taking part in the social offerings too which would just mean more home alone time for your poor dog. You don't say how old either you or the dog are but this sounds like a terrible idea - if you really can't be separated then you would have to hold off on Uni till the dog passed which would be a terrible thing hanging over you.
If the inheritance is large enough then maybe you could pay for doggy dare care but that doesn't make finding somewhere to live that much easier.
Sorry
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by StriderHort)
I dunno tbh, over the years i've seen landlords split down roughly the middle on pets. Plenty do say no, along with no smoking, poor people ect...but plenty also don't seem to care, you've paid a deposit and signed a contract making you responsible for cleaning and damages and they're happy with that. (my block allows pets no problems)

Mind you, I did have friends that moved to nice bit of London and got told it was £1000 deposit for each cat......although that was unsurprisingly basically a scam.
Yeh true, my parent is a landlord of a house and say they would be fine with pets if they paid a deposit however they mean cats and small furry things.
Having a hyperactivive dog stuck indoors whilst the OP is at a lecture I don't think would appeal to many landlords. Dogs destroy things when bored

(Original post by Reality Check)
This isn't going to happen, if I'm going to be blunt about it. The chances of your finding a landlord who will let to a student with a pet are vanishingly small. In fact, I've never heard of it. As for being a lodger, it is again very unlikely to be able to find someone willing to take you on and, with a hyperactive dog, the chances are even smaller.

However, this isn't the important point. What will the dog do when you go into lectures, even for short periods? You can't take the dog with you, and you've already said s/he's both hyperactive and you're both inseparable. How do you think she'd behave in a strange house with you disappearing for hours at a time?! It's simply not fair on you and, more importantly, not fair on the dog.

Unless you can find someone else to look after your dog during term time, I think you're going to have to make a tough decision.
Basically this. It's not fair on the dog at all
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StriderHort
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Yeh true, my parent is a landlord of a house and say they would be fine with pets if they paid a deposit however they mean cats and small furry things.
Having a hyperactivive dog stuck indoors whilst the OP is at a lecture I don't think would appeal to many landlords. Dogs destroy things when bored

Basically this. It's not fair on the dog at all
Well you wouldn't tell the landlord it was hyperactive, would you?

"Is it a well behaved dog?"

"..Yeah....sure. Why not."

I'm only commenting on the landlord bit btw, as said, i'm a private renting student, and as far as I'm aware have no restrictions on pets, but i'm aware others do. I can see why people are saying it still wouldn't really work.
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MrMusician95
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You'd probably need to find non student accommodation, as no student building will allow it. And you need to make sure you'll have enough space. I'm sorry but a small university room or even a room in a non student house will not be enough space for a dog. That's not fair on the lovely creature.
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marvelgirl27
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Thank you for your responses.

I don't think that I have explained myself properly here. My dog is my life, pretty much. She is quite high-energy, although sleeps if she is left at home alone. She will occasionally turf through someone's bag, but apart from that isn't destructive. She is used to travelling with me for competitions and the like as well, so staying away from home is normal for her. I have thought about asking fellow competitors whether they have a room to spare - which I think would be the ideal for us, or renting a house or flat through them.

I understand that an important part of university is the social side, however, with my autism, socialisation isn't something that I often feel comfortable doing and therefore you won't find me attending many social events. They aren't my scene.
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doodle_333
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(Original post by marvelgirl27)
Thank you for your responses.

I don't think that I have explained myself properly here. My dog is my life, pretty much. She is quite high-energy, although sleeps if she is left at home alone. She will occasionally turf through someone's bag, but apart from that isn't destructive. She is used to travelling with me for competitions and the like as well, so staying away from home is normal for her. I have thought about asking fellow competitors whether they have a room to spare - which I think would be the ideal for us, or renting a house or flat through them.

I understand that an important part of university is the social side, however, with my autism, socialisation isn't something that I often feel comfortable doing and therefore you won't find me attending many social events. They aren't my scene.
Honestly it doesn't matter that she s your life. You're searching for 0.01% of landlords who might consider a student with a pet and hoping you can afford the room and it's free. It's really not likely to happen. And you will have to go to lessons for big chunks of time, sleep or not no dog is happy alone for large periods. It's not fair and it won't work. Go to a local uni or wait until your dog has passed. I'm sorry but those are really your only options as described on here already.
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londonmyst
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It is great that you love your dog so much.

Don't give up hope of finding a private landlord who will accept a student tenant with a dog.
Whilst many landlords do have a 'no pets' allowed policy, I have shared accommodation with both student and non-student flatmates with dogs.
As an undergrad, I lived in London with four other people and two large dogs that detested each other so much that they had to be kept separate.
Landlords do ask for higher deposits from pet owners and tend to keep as much of the deposit as they can citing "damage caused by the dog".
It is difficult but not impossible.

Have you thought of investing your inheritance in a buy to let property?
You could live in one room with your dog, rent out the other rooms to tenants who are dog friendly and willing to organise a schedule that includes all tenants helping out with exercising the canine pal- maybe as a swap with cleaning, taking out the rubbish and utility bill division.
That arrangement worked well when I was an undergrad.
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Anonymous #1
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Just commenting so I read the replies. This thread is pure comedy.

marvelgirl27 thinks she's going to get a way with having a dog in a private housing accommodation. You might as well just get yourself a furry stuffed animal dog instead.
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