Hey all you geography lot...need a bit of help Watch

SpiritedAway
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#1
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#1
ok, i thought this would be the best place to come since i am geographically ******ed.

is africa a country or a continent?
is kenya a third world country?
where is the fourth world and WTF is it?

thank you (BTW there is a purpose to all these questions, i am not just asking for the hell of it.)
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kftjkp
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Africa is a continent.
Kenya is a third world country,
Fourth world: a population (or ethnic group) that are socially excluded, e.g. Palestinians, [Kurds], North Koreans etc.
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Keoje
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Africa is a continent.
Kenya is a 3rd world country.

I don't remember a 4th world mentioned in GCSE geography so I'd say it's all in your head.
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SpiritedAway
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does kenya have natural distasters? if so, what? and what about ethiopia? and is there any other African/3rd world country that has natural disasters?
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kftjkp
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Droughts, sandstorms. Floods in Mozambique.
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SpiritedAway
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a drought is a natural distaster?
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kftjkp
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Well...it's a disaster that is not (usually) caused by man.
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SpiritedAway
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ah, ok. thanks. (i wasn't having a go (just in case it sounded like i was) i am just generally clueless )
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SpiritedAway
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i have another question. when on about population density does 153/sq. mi mean there is 153 people per square mile, and if so/not is it a lot?
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TheOneWho
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Yes, it does mean that there are 153 people per square mile, although I usually see population density measured in square kms. It's not an awful lot, no, but it's not sparsely populated. Japan has over 800 people per square mile, whereas brazil has less than 100. I think those figures are right, it's off the top of my head and going back a couple of years.

Population densities for countries aren't much use anyway, since they just use the area of the country and fit the population into it, if you see what I mean. It doesn't take into account dense areas like cities or sparse rural areas.
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SpiritedAway
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#11
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would poisoned water (like in the African countries) be a natural catastophe?
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Benjoss
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Hi, most academics and academic writing now excludes the first world-third world distinction. First world is now considered a ‘developed state’ and this refers to countries with strong economies, higher standards of living and more advanced technologies. Second world is now considered a ‘state in transition’. These are countries that are communist or were communist recently, and have made the transition to a democratic style of governance. This includes Cuba, most of Eastern Europe and some East Asian countries. Third world countries are now regarded as ‘developing states’. Kenya is a developing country as is probably all of Africa. Finally, forth world countries are now regarded as ‘failed states’. These are countries that have no efficient or working government. Today this would include Afghanistan, Somalia and Sudan.

Also, a natural disaster is an event associated with normal geographical or geological processes that causes death, injury, loss of income, or property. So poisoned water would not be considered a natural disaster unless it was done naturally. Since Africa is the poorest continent on the planet it is more susceptible to the effects of natural disasters then England or other developed countries. In Vancouver, Canada we have building regulations that state that our buildings must be able to withstand a large earthquake, yet in developing countries these regulations are not in place so the risk of injury or death is greater. E.g. in Japan, a developed country, on average a hurricane will kill about 23 people. However, in Bangladesh, a developing country a hurricane will kill 1341. Some of the risks that could affect Kenya or East Africa are:
mudslides
floods
droughts
heat waves
wildfires
famine
diseases and parasites
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TheOneWho
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The terms 'global north' and 'global south' are more used than developed, transition and developing states.
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