chazwomaq
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(Original post by Anonymous469)
I am interested in neuroscience but still not sure. Maybe a degree where I get to understand the brain language and then translate and process it into computational terms and computerize it.
That's a very niche thing to focus on before you've even started a degree. I would aim more broadly for what interests you. Is it the human body? Is it the biological basis of the mind? Is it using computers to understand the brain (and vice versa)?

Medicine is the degree that will offer you by far the best job prospects, but you do have to be very committed. Some relevant experience is very useful to see if you would enjoy a healthcare environment.

Neuroscience is another option. However, if you really want to get in computational neuro, I would recommend doing something like computer science or maths as a degree. The technical skills you get from these degree mean it is much easier to move into a biological field. By contrast, biology/biomed grads will have fewer technical skills and will find this area daunting.
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(Original post by Anonymous469)
I'd like to take you upon your request and ask a single question, if I may? I have discovered an interest of mine which I had for quiet some time but couldn't figure out what it was specifically. Anyways, to get to the point, in looking at a degree bachelor's or masters, may it be, which involves the research on BCI technology (Brain Computer Interface). It is basically an interface like our smart phones and desktops but is controlled via our brain. So if you know what degree contains content about this technology, I would be very thankful. 😄
Hello,
Hmmm I don't think so - or at least not as undergraduate level. You won't get to study specifically neurobiology until 3rd year and so far we haven't covered anything like that! It's more likely you'd study that in a computer science degree. You'd have to look at specific neuroscience courses which we don't offer here so I'm not too sure! This sounds more like postgraduate content though.
Charlotte
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Anonymous469
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#23
(Original post by chazwomaq)
That's a very niche thing to focus on before you've even started a degree. I would aim more broadly for what interests you. Is it the human body? Is it the biological basis of the mind? Is it using computers to understand the brain (and vice versa)?

Medicine is the degree that will offer you by far the best job prospects, but you do have to be very committed. Some relevant experience is very useful to see if you would enjoy a healthcare environment.

Neuroscience is another option. However, if you really want to get in computational neuro, I would recommend doing something like computer science or maths as a degree. The technical skills you get from these degree mean it is much easier to move into a biological field. By contrast, biology/biomed grads will have fewer technical skills and will find this area daunting.
I am looking at "using the computer to understand the brain". I have been interested in that concept for a long time due to its potential growth and all applications it could be utilized in. If it is able to successfully come to our world I am sure that it is going to be life-changing. That is something I would like to be apart of. Also, whenever new technology is introduced, the pace of work is incredible, which I find exhilarating to a certain extent ofcourse. Anyways, moving back to our main topic I also used to have an interest in medicine not very long ago, and medicine is a degree that holds many future job/careers under its belt. So, I would like to confirm if it is possible to apply to computational neuroscience as a med grad?

Thank you
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chazwomaq
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(Original post by Anonymous469)
I am looking at "using the computer to understand the brain". I have been interested in that concept for a long time due to its potential growth and all applications it could be utilized in. If it is able to successfully come to our world I am sure that it is going to be life-changing. ...So, I would like to confirm if it is possible to apply to computational neuroscience as a med grad?
I would be extremely surprised if any masters course in this area would not accept a med grad. Sheffield and Newcastle, for example, specifically mention medicine as acceptable. I think medicine would be fine training, and technology like computer science a good alternative.
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(Original post by chazwomaq)
I would be extremely surprised if any masters course in this area would not accept a med grad. Sheffield and Newcastle, for example, specifically mention medicine as acceptable. I think medicine would be fine training, and technology like computer science a good alternative.
I think it would be a bit of an odd choice to do medicine as an undergraduate degree to then go on and do a masters. Medicine is one of the most competitive degrees and requires extra admissions tests (which you have to pay for) as well as interviews, and medicine admissions are looking for people who want to be doctors and have well researched that - not people who want to study a very specific masters. It's also a much longer degree so will be costing you a lot more than a typical undergraduate degree.
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chazwomaq
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(Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador)
I think it would be a bit of an odd choice to do medicine as an undergraduate degree to then go on and do a masters. Medicine is one of the most competitive degrees and requires extra admissions tests (which you have to pay for) as well as interviews, and medicine admissions are looking for people who want to be doctors and have well researched that - not people who want to study a very specific masters. It's also a much longer degree so will be costing you a lot more than a typical undergraduate degree.
Charlotte
Doctors often do postgraduate training alongside their medical jobs.
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(Original post by chazwomaq)
Doctors often do postgraduate training alongside their medical jobs.
Yeah and it's usually a decision made after being a doctor for quite a few years, and after working a field for a while. I'm just making the point that if your motivation to study medicine is not to be a doctor but to study a postgraduate in something else, that's not appealing to admissions tutors.
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Ben2021
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if you are interested in being a scientist, I would say go for biomed rather than just neuroscience or genetics. You never know if you really like the these specific subjects at this age. If you are really into neuroscience, I will suggest computational sciences. There are too many wet lab neuroscientists nowadays and any biomed trained people can do this web lab work. Ones with computation background will be preferred by the labs “really” researching the brain.
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Anonymous469
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(Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador)
Yeah and it's usually a decision made after being a doctor for quite a few years, and after working a field for a while. I'm just making the point that if your motivation to study medicine is not to be a doctor but to study a postgraduate in something else, that's not appealing to admissions tutors.
Charlotte
Hello Charlotte,

I apologize for the late reply.

I am interested in medicine to become a doctor. Unfortunately, I can't imagine myself to be the type who gets employed and sticks to one job for the rest of his life. I like to venture out and discover many different routes "science-oriented". More specifically I am interested in Cardiology, Neuroscience and Computer Science. With that in mind I can study medicine as an undergraduate then pursue a Master's of Surgery. And experience the field for a while and try to do a major contribution, if possible, in the field. Then try to learn about another master's course (looking at computational neuroscience and cognitive robotics). Also because medicine has such a wide variety of possible master routes to it and if for some reason I lose interested in a certain master's then I still have some flexibility to spring back into action and not regret taking that specific undergraduate course. Afterall, as you said before what I chose is pretty specific and if I lose interest all my work would have went to vain.
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Anonymous469
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(Original post by Ben2021)
if you are interested in being a scientist, I would say go for biomed rather than just neuroscience or genetics. You never know if you really like the these specific subjects at this age. If you are really into neuroscience, I will suggest computational sciences. There are too many wet lab neuroscientists nowadays and any biomed trained people can do this web lab work. Ones with computation background will be preferred by the labs “really” researching the brain.
Biomedicine is a course that I keep comparing to medicine all the time. I views and opinions on both keep fluctuating over and over again unfortunately I cannot foresee which will be my go-to course but I'm currently leaning towards medicine for the time being.

I am not well acquainted with the term "wet lab". If possible, may I ask for a clarification?

Thank you
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Anonymous469
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(Original post by chazwomaq)
I would be extremely surprised if any masters course in this area would not accept a med grad. Sheffield and Newcastle, for example, specifically mention medicine as acceptable. I think medicine would be fine training, and technology like computer science a good alternative.
I apologize for the late reply I was searching intensively into computational neuroscience and cognitive robotics that I forgot to check back on my forum 😅. Sorry about that. I did look into the requirements for the above master's course for UCL and University of Birmingham though it says accept Biomedicine, computer science, psychology... I cannot find medicine. Though it does say "or any other relevant course" I am not sure if I should entrust my whole bachelor's course to such vague words. I did contact both universities recently, and I am waiting for a response.
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Ben2021
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(Original post by Anonymous469)
Biomedicine is a course that I keep comparing to medicine all the time. I views and opinions on both keep fluctuating over and over again unfortunately I cannot foresee which will be my go-to course but I'm currently leaning towards medicine for the time being.

I am not well acquainted with the term "wet lab". If possible, may I ask for a clarification?

Thank you
Well, if medicine is also an option for you, I will say go for it. A physician can easily be a scientist, but it is more difficult the other way around. I am a biomed scientist and have worked in neuroscience and other fields for several years. I know now I want to go back to do medicine and be a physician-scientist, but it will take much longer time.

wet lab means all the biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, etc experiments carried out in most labs. because you will use all kinds of reagents, chemicals and solutions, we usually call them wet lab work. In contrast, there is in silico work, primarily bioinformatics, which needs lots of computation. For neuroscience, many people try to study neural circuits by computer science, together with wet lab.
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