Are teachers brainwashing young innocent kids these days?

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idontkn
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Title. As in learning about masturbation at the age of 6 now when they can barely wash by themselves, or learning about sex and everything (not what we older generation learnt about but more than sex, like graphic details) by the time they are in year 6, also teaching lgbt in schools when they don’t understand anything. Do they ask little kids what gender they want to be and then teach them to become that gender? My sister is scared of sending her son to school next year because she seems to think teachers ask kids what gender they want to be and then teach them to be that gender, so she is literally teaching him the phrase “I am a boy” just like her friends’ daughter learnt the phrase “I am a girl” so when anyone asks her what her name is she says her name is “I am a girl”
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riekeleah
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No, teachers aren't brainwashing students and 6 year olds are not taught about masturbation. That's not how the PSHE curriculum works. Source: I've been through it, and my younger brother also has, and my youngest brother is currently 7 and has not been taught any of this.

During primary school, children are taught that relationships exist, and gay people exist, in very simple terms. Say, they make up a child e.g Jeremy, and Jeremy has a mummy and daddy, and his friend Amy has two mummies etc. Nothing explicit, and certainly nothing like you're thinking.

When girls are in year 5 (so 9-10), they will be taught about periods. This is completely necessary as this is around the time some of them will be starting periods. I started mine at 9 years old and would've had no idea what to do and would've been incredibly scared if I wasn't taught at school what it was and what to do.

In year 6 (10-11), I was shown a video explaining puberty, and the very basics of sex. It is NOT a how-to sex guide! It pretty much says that sex exists, and when they reach puberty they may experience sexual drive etc. It's not dirty, it's educational.

In terms of gender, it depends on the school. But they won't brainwash your child. It seems to me your sister is scared that her son is going to be gay or trans, which is her own problem with her own prejudices. Nothing he learns at school will make him gay or trans. He just will be if he is. Just because your sister cannot accept this, does not mean there is anything wrong with the sex education in primary schools.
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idontkn
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(Original post by riekeleah)
No, teachers aren't brainwashing students and 6 year olds are not taught about masturbation. That's not how the PSHE curriculum works. Source: I've been through it, and my younger brother also has, and my youngest brother is currently 7 and has not been taught any of this.

During primary school, children are taught that relationships exist, and gay people exist, in very simple terms. Say, they make up a child e.g Jeremy, and Jeremy has a mummy and daddy, and his friend Amy has two mummies etc. Nothing explicit, and certainly nothing like you're thinking.

When girls are in year 5 (so 9-10), they will be taught about periods. This is completely necessary as this is around the time some of them will be starting periods. I started mine at 9 years old and would've had no idea what to do and would've been incredibly scared if I wasn't taught at school what it was and what to do.

In year 6 (10-11), I was shown a video explaining puberty, and the very basics of sex. It is NOT a how-to sex guide! It pretty much says that sex exists, and when they reach puberty they may experience sexual drive etc. It's not dirty, it's educational.

In terms of gender, it depends on the school. But they won't brainwash your child. It seems to me your sister is scared that her son is going to be gay or trans, which is her own problem with her own prejudices. Nothing he learns at school will make him gay or trans. He just will be if he is. Just because your sister cannot accept this, does not mean there is anything wrong with the sex education in primary schools.
https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.d...g-lessons.html

Read that. It’s a new thing that has been introduced. My sister who is 11 has been taught about sex and periods and dirty stuff like boys producing semen and ejaculation and masturbation and even learnt how to stick on a pad on a sample underwear. I think that is too much in my opinion, when I was her age I didn’t even learn about periods let alone graphic dirty things like that, I learnt at 12. I had my period at 10 years old and didn’t know anything about periods so it was obviously terrifying. My cousin (male) who is also her age learnt about girls having periods and about sex and he was so scared that he went and told his mum in fear and now he’s scared of holding hands with his own sister and doesn’t let anyone supervise him. My younger sister is going through the phase of “look the other way” in bed when someone is facing the same way in bed as her, when it’s even mum or her own siblings. I told her many times it’s not like it’s going to lead to sex.

They are now teaching kids in more detail than just sex (or the most for me was the penis entering the vagina).

My sister is not prejudiced, it’s part of our religion, you can’t be gay or trans, and even if she is, she doesn’t need to worry because my nephew is definitely a boy, and I do not want to have this religion debate.
Last edited by idontkn; 1 year ago
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username4499734
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They only teach what they’re told to teach, so this could be the Gov making ****ty changes
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XANA21
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Oh absolutely. But its a secular, broken and craphole of a country. (Cant leave. I was born here. Anyone wanna swap citizenships for 500K?)😂
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Euphoria101
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I got my period at 10. Kids learning about periods at 11 isn’t inappropriate because periods aren’t inappropriate.

I do however agree that sex ed should wait for Year 7.
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riekeleah
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(Original post by idontkn)
https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.d...g-lessons.html

Read that. It’s a new thing that has been introduced. My sister who is 11 has been taught about sex and periods and dirty stuff like boys producing semen and ejaculation and masturbation and even learnt how to stick on a pad on a sample underwear. I think that is too much in my opinion, when I was her age I didn’t even learn about periods let alone graphic dirty things like that, I learnt at 12. I had my period at 10 years old and didn’t know anything about periods so it was obviously terrifying. My cousin (male) who is also her age learnt about girls having periods and about sex and he was so scared that he went and told his mum in fear and now he’s scared of holding hands with his own sister and doesn’t let anyone supervise him. My younger sister is going through the phase of “look the other way” in bed when someone is facing the same way in bed as her, when it’s even mum or her own siblings. I told her many times it’s not like it’s going to lead to sex.

They are now teaching kids in more detail than just sex (or the most for me was the penis entering the vagina).

My sister is not prejudiced, it’s part of our religion, you can’t be gay or trans, and I do not want to have this religion debate.
Cool, it's part of your religion. Don't put that on your kids. It doesn't matter if it says in a book somewhere that you can't be gay or trans, the child may end up being gay or trans. If he's constantly being taught it's wrong, it's going to mess him up, not make him straight. As in, mental health issues.

Boys producing semen isn't dirty. It's biology. It's hard fact. She'll learn it again in year 7 biology.

Maybe the children are freaking out because you're making them. You're telling them all of these things are dirty and wrong, instead of encouraging healthy (PRIVATE) discussion of it.

You said yourself that you were terrified when you first had your period. Would it not have been helpful to be properly taught what it is and how to deal with it? Practicing putting on pads is great. It means less leakages from putting it on wrong, and being taught how often to change it etc. It's medical necessity, and avoids a lot of childhood embarrassment.
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idontkn
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(Original post by riekeleah)
Cool, it's part of your religion. Don't put that on your kids. It doesn't matter if it says in a book somewhere that you can't be gay or trans, the child may end up being gay or trans. If he's constantly being taught it's wrong, it's going to mess him up, not make him straight. As in, mental health issues.

Boys producing semen isn't dirty. It's biology. It's hard fact. She'll learn it again in year 7 biology.

Maybe the children are freaking out because you're making them. You're telling them all of these things are dirty and wrong, instead of encouraging healthy (PRIVATE) discussion of it.

You said yourself that you were terrified when you first had your period. Would it not have been helpful to be properly taught what it is and how to deal with it? Practicing putting on pads is great. It means less leakages from putting it on wrong, and being taught how often to change it etc. It's medical necessity, and avoids a lot of childhood embarrassment.
I am not teaching them anything so don’t put this on me. I am not making them terrified, my sister and my cousin are naturally terrified to even be around each other. They find it weird, I think everyone goes through that phase. When I was their age i didn’t learn about men producing semen and women lubricating and ejaculation.

Yes I do believe that learning about periods in year 5 is good, and maybe separate both genders to avoid boys and girls being awkward around each other, but sex education or at least in depth sex education (which is what kids are learning nowadays) should wait to year 7.
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Euphoria101
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(Original post by idontkn)
I am not teaching them anything so don’t put this on me. I am not making them terrified, my sister and my cousin are naturally terrified to even be around each other. They find it weird, I think everyone goes through that phase. When I was their age i didn’t learn about men producing semen and women lubricating and ejaculation.

Yes I do believe that learning about periods in year 5 is good, and maybe separate both genders to avoid boys and girls being awkward around each other, but sex education or at least in depth sex education (which is what kids are learning nowadays) should wait to year 7.
You’re contradicting yourself then. You said you thought periods were too inappropriate and now you’re saying it’s good?
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riekeleah
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(Original post by idontkn)
my sister and my cousin are naturally terrified to even be around each other
There's nothing natural about cousins being terrified to be around each other. Try explaining that nothing they've learned about sex happens between family members. That should be made clear to them. Ask them why they feel like this, and talk through it trying to be rational with them.

Obviously, this advice is aimed at the relevant parents, not you specifically.
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idontkn
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(Original post by dyingstudent101)
You’re contradicting yourself then. You said you thought periods were too inappropriate and now you’re saying it’s good?
Sorry if it came across that way. I feel like periods should only be taught to girls and not boys. It happens to girls, and girls mature faster than boys. Some boys just keep repeating the word period to try and annoy or embarrass girls and are just plain immature.
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idontkn
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(Original post by riekeleah)
There's nothing natural about cousins being terrified to be around each other. Try explaining that nothing they've learned about sex happens between family members. That should be made clear to them. Ask them why they feel like this, and talk through it trying to be rational with them.

Obviously, this advice is aimed at the relevant parents, not you specifically.
Maybe because our religion doesn’t see cousins getting married and having sex as incest and they are the opposite gender? It never will happen with my sister and cousin anyway, like never, not even if my crazy aunt (mums sister) died, my mum would definitely not allow that to happen or at least, she definitely WON’T approve of the relationship.
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Euphoria101
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(Original post by idontkn)
Sorry if it came across that way. Or even now, (finished school after year 12) and 18, I feel like periods should only be taught to girls and not boys. It happens to girls, and girls mature faster than boys. Some boys just keep repeating the word period to try and annoy or embarrass girls and are just plain immature.
That’s exactly why we should educate boys. They only mock girls because they see it as something to mock, not something natural.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by idontkn)
Title. As in learning about masturbation at the age of 6 now
You appear to have been brainwashed. Could you please tell me which schools are teaching this?
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Obolinda
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(Original post by ByEeek)
You appear to have been brainwashed. Could you please tell me which schools are teaching this?
Would it even be a bad thing if they did, lol. 1987 letter published in the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine called "Sonographic observation of in utero fetal masturbation," Dr. Israel Meizner reported seeing a fetus behaving “in a fashion resembling masturbation movements” over the course of 15 minutes. “To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a fetal 'masturbation’ in utero,” said Meizner. In 1996 two Italian doctors published a letter ("Ultrasonographic observation of a female fetus' sexual behavior in utero") in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology in which they described observing a fetus making "masturbation movements."

So, not necessarily purposeful movements to evoke pleasure in utero but it isn't odd to see young ones (accidentally?) discovering that touching their private parts brings pleasure.

I'm not aware of these sort of lessons happening and I'm not even sure whether I'd advocate it being taught to 6 year olds! But if it was safeguarding, letting them know it's normal and making sure they're safe with it, it should be done in private, etc; not a step by step guide of how to masturbate and going into detail. I wouldn't have that much of a problem with it, tbh
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Drewski
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Bore off OP, you're the problem here

:troll:
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Leviathan1611
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tell your sister to homeschool then, problem solved.
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idontkn
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(Original post by ByEeek)
You appear to have been brainwashed. Could you please tell me which schools are teaching this?
Read the article I posted above. There are many more similar articles to those. Schools may not be currently teaching this but it’s slowly being phased in
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idontkn
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Sex education could ENCOURAGE as well as educate them about sex and it may cause teenage pregnancies. If you are not taught anything about sex then you won’t know that sex exists, and you won’t want to have sex young and won’t lead to teenage pregnancies.
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idontkn
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(Original post by Drewski)
Bore off OP, you're the problem here

:troll:
I have just as much right to post as you are.
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