How do I stop procrastinating?

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allenpc
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#1
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#1
I’m not getting anything done. I need help, how do I stop procrastinating until there’s no time left and I say “I’ll do it tomorrow” and this cycle repeats?
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E3student
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#2
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#2
For me I had to have some form of motivation to keep me going. This may have been thinking about the results I wanted on results day, getting into a good sixth form or uni or even just thinking that you may be rewarded from your work.

If you don’t have a motivation to keep going, you probably will keep procrastinating.
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rhsdh
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#3
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#3
you cannot stopping procrastinating bcz in your mind,the task is too hard to do. So,what you need to do is to split your task into some small parts,finish one part every day or every half day or every two hour. liking writting ps, you can set the aim that every day you write 50 words.
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Blankyt
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#4
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#4
Use the pomodoro technique - split your revision into 25 minute chunks and a 5 min break in between. This can prevent cognitive overload and approach revision in manageable chunks.

Focus on the present. What do you need to do that is stopping you from revising? Begin with simple steps such as collecting your revision materials and progressing to the actual revision. You could use techniques such as the Feynman technique to make revision fun and teach what you learn in simple terms to non specialist friends.

Keep a to do list app (like Minimalist) on a device, and at the start of the day, write 5 concrete tasks (ie. practise papers, review a topic etc) that you need to complete by the end of the day. As you go through them, tick them off and relax. You will have been more productive than your former self.
Last edited by Blankyt; 2 years ago
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allenpc
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#5
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#5
Thanks for all the advice. If anyone new sees this thread I’d love to hear your advice too.
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theveganbookworm
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#6
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#6
I'm in Yr 11, I had this problem in Yr 10 until I created a revision timetable on getrevising.com, it's a really good way to split up your revision into manageable chunks, just make sure you don't procrastinate by spending hours creating it and editing it. I also use the app Forest, which is really useful to stop you from picking up your phone all the time, and my friends are on it too so we compete for how long we spent revising, which makes it more fun and you feel proud as you see your minutes stack up 😊.
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Ellie__99
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#7
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#7
It might sound really simple but the most effective thing for me is to write it down. Writing a list means I can see what needs to be done right in front of me and I can tick it off when it's done. I find if I don't and it's all my head I have a kind of 'what I can't see can't hurt me' attitude, meaning I just keep avoiding the tasks and forget about it quickly. If I can see it, I feel responsible for getting it done and feel a sense of fulfilment when it's done!
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PizzAzzz
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#8
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#8
Using all the tips from above, the only other thing I can give you as a serial procrastinator is to simply start it.

Just become a robot, go on autopilot, and just numb your mind and begin.

It is an exercise in willpower that you must overcome, and you'll come out stronger for it.

You may even realise the task is actually far more straightforward and less roadblock-y than it seems, if so then good! But if not, psychology states that you have a far higher chance of completing an already started task than one that hasn't begun - so quit planning and just be numb :smartass:

Also, *after you have finished your tasks* (revision/homework/whatever), then do go and research the state of flow, and what it means. Average people can usually get into a state of "flow" in tasks much easier than someone who procrastinates - that's how the average person seems to not procrastinate nearly as severely as people who call themselves procrastinators!


Spoiler:
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"Numb" is just the term I use to describe getting on with a task fully focused like a normal person would be. Because that's how it feels... you ignore all your other body sensations ringing bells for you to get back to procrastinating, and you just numb yourself until... whoops, it becomes something you're on a roll with and "in flow"!
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