Easiest method to add base 26 numbers? 🔢

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badmathkid
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How can I add the base 26 numbers?

(ABCDF) + (EFGHIJ)
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badmathkid
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anyone? 🧐
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Plücker
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(Original post by badmathkid)
How can I add the base 26 numbers?

(ABCDF) + (EFGHIJ)
Assuming you have A=10, B=11 etc then your first number is 10 x 26^4 + 11x 26^3 + etc..
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Prince Philip
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(Original post by badmathkid)
How can I add the base 26 numbers?

(ABCDF) + (EFGHIJ)
I'd write them on top of each other and use the addition algorithm you learnt in primary school.

So I'd start with F + J and to make it easier I'd just convert this to decimal which is 15 + 19 = 34 and then think about what 34 is in base 26. Well there is one 26 plus 8 more so 34 is equal to 18 in base 26.

This means that you would write 8 underneath F + J and carry a 1. Keep going like this and post your attempt if you get stuck.

EDIT: I've used the 0-9 A-P system which is not what the OP is using.
Last edited by Prince Philip; 1 year ago
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badmathkid
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(Original post by BuryMathsTutor)
Assuming you have A=10, B=11 etc then your first number is 10 x 26^4 + 11x 26^3 + etc..
I didn't thin of that. I assumed the answer had to be in terms of letters but I guess you can convert to letters at the end.
Thanks!
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badmathkid
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(Original post by Sir Cumference)
I'd write them on top of each other and use the addition algorithm you learnt in primary school.

So I'd start with F + J and to make it easier I'd just convert this to decimal which is 15 + 19 = 34 and then think about what 34 is in base 26. Well there is one 26 plus 8 more so 34 is equal to 18 in base 26.

This means that you would write 8 underneath F + J and carry a 1. Keep going like this and post your attempt if you get stuck.
Genius! Thanks a bunch! :woohoo:
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badmathkid
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(Original post by Sir Cumference)
I'd write them on top of each other and use the addition algorithm you learnt in primary school.

So I'd start with F + J and to make it easier I'd just convert this to decimal which is 15 + 19 = 34 and then think about what 34 is in base 26. Well there is one 26 plus 8 more so 34 is equal to 18 in base 26.

This means that you would write 8 underneath F + J and carry a 1. Keep going like this and post your attempt if you get stuck.
I'm slightly confused actually. You know where yo said F + J would be 15 + 19? Wouldn't it actually be 6 + 10?
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(Original post by badmathkid)
I'm slightly confused actually. You know where yo said F + J would be 15 + 19? Wouldn't it actually be 6 + 10?
0 to 9 would be as normal then A=10, B=11 etc.
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badmathkid
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(Original post by BuryMathsTutor)
0 to 9 would be as normal then A=10, B=11 etc.
Isn't that when you are dealing with base 12?
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(Original post by badmathkid)
Isn't that when you are dealing with base 12?
I've never done anything with base 26 but if you were working in hexadecimal i.e. base 16 you would have
digits 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,A,B,C,D,E,F with A=10, B=11...F=15

You should, of course, work with whatever convention your course uses.
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Prince Philip
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(Original post by badmathkid)
Isn't that when you are dealing with base 12?
Where did you get that screenshot from? The convention is to use 0-9 and then A-P but it could be that your course goes against convention!

EDIT: Actually this isn't the convention for base 26, see below.
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badmathkid
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(Original post by Sir Cumference)
Where did you get that screenshot from? The convention is to use 0-9 and then A-P but it could be that your course goes against convention!
I thought so because all the online calculators are giving me answers with numbers, i.e. F02468.
The screenshot is from a lecture slide.
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Prince Philip
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(Original post by badmathkid)
I thought so because all the online calculators are giving me answers with numbers, i.e. F02468.
The screenshot is from a lecture slide.
From Googling it seems like "base 26" commonly just contains 0 and letters. Okay so F + J = 6 + 10 = 16 and that is the 16th letter of the alphabet in this system which is P so you don't need to carry anything. Keep going from here.
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badmathkid
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(Original post by Sir Cumference)
From Googling it seems like "base 26" commonly just contains 0 and letters. Okay so F + J = 6 + 10 = 16 and that is the 16th letter of the alphabet in this system which is P so you don't need to carry anything. Keep going from here.
I see. I got "EGIKMP" as an answer but on an online calculator, apparently the answer is F02468. I understand how they got that answer (using your method which completely makes sense) but which one do I use?
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Prince Philip
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(Original post by badmathkid)
I see. I got "EGIKMP" as an answer but on an online calculator, apparently the answer is F02468. I understand how they got that answer (using your method which completely makes sense) but which one do I use?
The online calculator is using the convention used with other bases like hexadecimal. If your lectures are teaching you to use 0, A-X then definitely use this and ignore the online calculator.
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(Original post by Sir Cumference)
The online calculator is using the convention used with other bases like hexadecimal. If your lectures are teaching you to use 0, A-Z then definitely use this and ignore the online calculator.
Okay I'll do that. Thanks again!
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