Leah.J
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Report Thread starter 1 year ago
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I'm pretty sure I read that fibrous proteins have disulphide bridges which strengthen them somewhere. But aren't fibrous proteins secondary proteins ? And shouldn't disulphide bridges form between R groups ? I thought that the intermolecular forces in 2ndary proteins should be between constituents of the backbone.
One last thing, for a protein to be functional, it must be at least in the tertiary stage of folding, but with fibrous proteins, the folding is limited to secondary, what does this mean ? That the fibrous proteins aren't functional ? Does that make them structural ?
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star1812
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Fibrous proteins are quaternary proteins- all proteins are tertiary or quaternary- they are tertiary if they consist of one polypeptide chain and they are quaternary if they have more than one polypeptide (like fibrous proteins such as collagen). Fibrous don’t necessarily have disulphides bridges as bonds- only the one which have sulphur in the R groups of the amino acids
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